Animals: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$12.42
Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.95
  • Save: $1.53 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In stock on August 31, 2014.
Order it now.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Animals: A Novel Paperback – June 1, 2010


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.42
$1.06 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

Animals: A Novel + Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Prison
Price for both: $23.59

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Soft Skull Press; 1 edition (June 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593762771
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593762773
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #157,585 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

At the center of this dystopian novel lies a philosophical premise: that the line between human and animal is too unclear to justify inhumane treatment of the latter-whether pet or farm animal. In a twenty-second century America, a combination of mass extinction and economic hardship has led people to look for an alternate source of meat: disabled human beings, stripped of their humanity, who are either kept as pets or farmed, with cruel efficiency, as food. Sam is one such person, a deaf child abandoned by his mother and adopted as a pet. The "found manuscript" that tells his story, and the accompanying scholarly commentary, paint a convincing picture of moral decline and ethical inconsistency on a devastating scale. Though at times heavy-handed, Animals nonetheless has the moral clarity and narrative drive of the best of the genre. LePan's vision is extreme, and though he focuses more on the evils of factory farming than on vegan evangelism, some may find it off-putting. But even those who might disagree with his thesis will be compelled by the implications of this well-plotted and formally audacious tale.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Praise for Animals

“LePan has an astute understanding of the contradictions and weaknesses of human nature . . . [Animals] will most certainly make you look at that steak on your dinner plate a little differently.” —The Boston Globe

"A powerful piece of writing, and a disturbing call to conscience." —J.M. Coetzee

“LePan’s storytelling skills are on full display and the narrative brims with tension…. Animals is a brave and frequently fascinating novel, wrought with painful choices, harrowing journeys, and a deep passion for its subject matter.”—Montreal Review of Books

“An engaging story that asks deep and challenging questions.” —Peter Singer, author of Animal Liberation

“An engrossing, elegantly written, and timely contribution to the great tradition of dystopic fiction.” —Kathryn Shevelow, author of For the Love of Animals

“Devastating. Animals is a powerful novel, and a fully convincing one.” —P.K. Page

“Well written and engrossing. I found that the story hooked me from the start.” —Angus Taylor, University of Victoria, author of Animals and Ethics

“Provocative, original, beautifully crafted and achingly human, this is a novel that illuminates what we so called ‘higher beings’ strive to keep darkly hidden from our consciousness. No more, no more...destined to become a classic.” —Catherine Banks, author of Bone Cage

“A deeply moving narrative that can change your life—it did mine.” —Thomas Hurka, Jackman Distinguished Chair in Philosophical Studies, University of Toronto

“Immediately gripping and deeply moving, Animals imagines a future in which nonhuman animals have become extinct, and ‘defective’ once-human beings called mongrels have replaced them . . . In this powerful tale of a mongrel boy named Sam, Don LePan compels us to consider our own relationship to the fellow creatures that we love, abuse, and eat. Animals is an engrossing, elegantly written, and timely contribution to the great tradition of dystopic fiction.” —Kathryn Shevelow, Professor of English Literature, University of California, San Diego; author of For the Love of Animals

Animals is an impressive book that makes a powerful statement—I think it is the Animal Farm of these times. It’s also an accomplished work formally; a flowing narrative forms its central current, but brilliant shifts in style and narrative voice keep swirling within that current, and strong commentaries that are moral yet not homiletic keep forming eddies around it.” —Victor Ramraj, Professor of English Literature, University of Calgary, editor of Concert of Voices: An Anthology of World Writing in English

"As an analysis of the human capacity to reconcile sentiment with savagery, it's spot on: psychologically incisive, admirably disquieting . . . LePan may openly grind his axe, but what makes the book powerful is just how keenly that axe cuts through our ethical hypocrisy." —Jim Bartley, The Globe and Mail

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Balcombe on August 1, 2010
Format: Paperback
As gripping as it is important, LePan's brilliant first novel tackles the largest moral issue of our time while scarcely mentioning its victims at all. Instead, a century into the future, cognitively challenged humans called "mongrels" take the place of now-extinct factory farmed animals--grown in crowded sheds, mutilated, fattened in finishing pens then prodded into chutes for slaughter. We meet one of these unfortunates, Sam, who is loved early in life but finds himself caught up in the future of meat ("yurn") production. By creating a subhuman category, LePan blurs the line we draw between ourselves and other sentient animals. Lest anyone fail to connect this story with our appalling current treatment of animals destined for our plates, the author includes an unambiguous afterword.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Paul Keen on July 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
If you read any novel, read this! Animals is one of the most important Canadian novels to have emerged in many years. Utterly disturbing and gripping and incredibly well told, it poses difficult questions and highlights in unsettling ways our capacity for complicity in a whole range of practices that we would rather simply not know about. LePan's dystopian satire is poignant and dark and always absolutely bang on. It is set somewhere around the end of the twenty-first century. The livestock industry has collapsed as a result of increasingly barbaric practices so meat is no longer available. Worse, there has been a rapidly growing rate of children born with severe disabilities, so much so that these children have become classified as mongrels -- as creatures rather than humans. Things get worse when people realize that the answer is obvious: these mongrels could be consumed as meat. All that is needed is a name change. They come to be referred to as chattel, and their meat as yurn or fland. The story itself is extraordinarily well conceived -- it is so easy to go overboard with this kind of writing but LePan never does. Quite the opposite, a great part of its power lies in what LePan manages to avoid; the narrative is suggestive rather than graphic or confrontational. Somewhere Jonathan Swift is grinning wryly. But what can get lost in the brilliance of the satire is just how beautiful the writing is -- always at its most poetic at all the most awful moments. It was horrible and yet I couldn't stop reading as the plot moves inexorably forward. The final sections were about the saddest thing that I have read, but never in a way that seemed needless or opportunistic or excessive. This is a major addition to Canadian literature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robin L. Sewell on December 5, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
read the other reviews and decided to purchase the book. from the moment I picked it up, I could not put it down. Brilliant and disturbing, I feel compelled to give the book as gifts to a few special people. It's the kind of book that will stay with you and change the way you think about people and animals. Haunting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By R. Rastogi on August 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
Aside from "Eating Animals" by Jonathan Safran Foer, the preeminent treatise on why factorty farming is cruel, inhumane, and flat-out disgusting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Scott Shaffer on May 24, 2013
Format: Paperback
I rarely review, but I see a lot of 4- and 5-star reviews and praise for a book I couldn't even finish, something else that's rare for me. (The last book I gave up on was Anne Rice's "The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty" sometime in 2003.)

My wife picked me up a copy of this novel because she knew I enjoyed dystopias as written by Burgess, Huxley, Orwell, and to a degree Suzanne Collins. The difference between their stories and LePan's is that LePan breaks one of the first rules pounded into you in any creative writing class: Show, don't tell.

The plot reads like a case study, but then the plot is also interjected by an actual case study. Long stretches of exposition describe the rise in numbers and eventual dehumanization of the "mongrels." Though slow, I've read worse beginnings to stories, so I continued. The first sign that something was off, however, came from this:

"People used to say that it would be absurd to imagine a deaf person being mistaken for a mongrel. But I'd hazard it's no more surprising than a white person being mistaken for a black person if they have a dark complexion, or if they blacked up their skin."

What a ridiculous analogy! This was part of the case study between Parts 1 and 2, if I recall correctly. I was nearing the end of that lengthy section when I finally realized I just didn't care whatsoever about the rest of the story.

If you're looking for a fictionalized attack on the food industries in Western civilization, then this is probably a good book for you. I could see it being used in a classroom. But it's far from light/casual reading and definitely not for those who enjoy character-driven stories. I give it 2 stars for being grammatically correct (the parts I read, at least) and for being marketable to someone (probably a very specific niche), but obviously not me.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great product! Thought I was buying a used book, but it's currently the shiniest/cleanest book I've ever owned! Which is saying something cause I rarely buy used books (which I'm trying to change).

As for the read? Decent. Interesting, thought provoking, though hard to read sometimes. I have some issues with the structure, but good perspective, either way. I would recommend it to everyone except my aunt (well, okay, and anyone who's particularly sensitive and squeamish) for the perspective alone. It's worth noting that the argument is against factory farming and animal cruelty, not against consuming animal products.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?