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Anime Essentials: Every Thing a Fan Needs to Know Paperback – December 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Stone Bridge Press (December 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1880656531
  • ISBN-13: 978-1880656532
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #519,254 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Attention all otakus! Check out other great anime books from Stone Bridge Press, including Fred Schodt's classic DREAMLAND JAPAN: WRITINGS ON MODERN MANGA, Helen McCarthy's HAYAO MIYAZAKI: MASTER OF JAPANESE ANIMATION, Ryan Omega's ANIME TRIVIA QUIZBOOKS, EPISODES 1 & 2, and of course, Gilles Poitras's THE ANIME COMPANION: WHAT'S JAPANESE IN JAPANESE ANIMATION.

About the Author

Gilles Poitras is a California librarian who first discovered anime in 1977. As a fan of films he was attracted by the use of cinematic efffects in ways that he had never seen in animation. He has been interviewed in several documentaries on anime and writes a monthly column on anime for Newtype USA magazine. He is also author of Anime Essentials.

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Customer Reviews

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This book doesn't tell you everything you need to know, but it's a good place to start.
Michael K. Smith
One of the most interesting things Poitras did in the book is to break out the "generations" of American anime fans, as to when they became aware of anime.
Lesley Aeschliman
A wonderful resource for all anime fans, from seasoned otaku to people just getting interested in this wonderful artform!
Will Piersson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By James M. Stafford III on July 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
I already owned Poitras' The Anime Companion and regularly visit his Web site, so I knew Anime Essentials would be a great book. Anime Essentials has A LOT of great, useful information for those just beginning to learn about anime beyond the Sailor Moon and Pokémon crazes, covering many facets from history to distribution to making connections to merchandise. Also included are 41 recommended anime titles (films, series, and OAVs), as well as various anime resources.
As an otaku, I still found plenty of new information in this book, as well as a fresh new perspective on several anime titles. Of the 41 recommended titles, I have seen all but five, which I suppose marks my "status" as an otaku. Poitras' insights into the famous Otaku no video were especially interesting, and can teach even diehard anime otaku more about this great series.
This is a great book for parents, teachers, and anyone else who deals with children who regularly watch CardCaptors, Sailor Moon, Pokémon, and other anime what anime is really about, and this information will be especially useful as these children grow and move on to more "sophisticated" anime. (If only this book had been available when I first discovered anime.....)
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Brian Ruh on February 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
I was sincerely looking forward to this book, as any new addition to the body of literature on anime is a good one. However, the first thing I noticed is how small the book is; it barely squeaks over 125 pages. At the same time, the font used for the main text seems excessively large. What this means is that there was far less actual reading material in this book than I had originally hoped for?
And the content? I didn't find much new in this book, which was another disappointment; I was hoping to discover some great insider information and maybe a few fan secrets. Admittedly, this book isn't written for fans like me. Rather, this is a fairly painless entry into the world of Japanese animation, and with that in mind it serves its purpose very well. Still, it should have been titled "A Basic Primer" rather than "Every Thing a Fan Needs to Know."
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Michael K. Smith TOP 500 REVIEWER on March 14, 2005
Format: Paperback
I'm too old to have discovered Japanese manga and anime in my youth, but I've made up for that the past few years. Being interested in Japanese culture and literature generally, I had some understanding of why anime is the way it is, and why it's so much different from American or European graphic art, but reading this well-written book, I found there was a great deal I had missed. Poitras writes from the fan's point of view, so he knows what questions he should be addressing -- everything from the "big eye" mania, to the difference between hentai and mainstream manga, to the nervousness among the U.S. morals police about "foreign" art, to actually setting up and publicizing a fan group, plus the ins and outs of model kits, imported publications, and so on. There's also an excellent rundown of recommended anime titles and series, which I've photocopied as a checklist. This book doesn't tell you everything you need to know, but it's a good place to start.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
First viewing this book I had my doubts, but reading through it proved it was worth it cost. This book is for just about anyone who is interested in becoming an otaku, or even someone who has been an otaku for some time. It gives references to an anime entitle "Otaku no Video" throughout. Also excellent hints for starting your own anime club in your area. Fallowed by a list of anime titles, web site, etc... It gives you infomation, and alows you to come up with some of your own ideas. If you are looking to become an otaku this book will put you well on the track.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By setlib on August 4, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book was a needed resource when it was first published in 2001, but now (2011) there are newer, better guides available. This book is written at about a middle-school reading level as a very simple introduction. However a better anime overview for middle school kids would be the 2008 reference "Anime" by Hal Marcovitz. For parents and educators, a more thorough explanation of the anime phenomenon is available in the superb Understanding Manga and Anime.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
This was one of the first books I ever read on the subject of anime fandom. I found it mind-bogglingly informative! Since I first read it, I have recommended it to any number of friends also hoping to get into anime. It includes all of anime's basic points in a very friendly format. Even now (as a seasoned anime fan) I still revisit it if I need a brush-up on the essentials! ^_^
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. White on August 23, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book about the Anime genre. It describes not only the history of anime but the various styles and elements that make anime unique.

The author includes recomendations in the different anime styles and makes parental recomendations as well.

Elements of Japanese culture are woven into the descriptions making this an all around good read and reference book.

There is also a video animation called "Otaku no Video" which complements this book and has a similar cover.

If you want to learn more about anime or are a fan pick both of these titles!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Paul Chapin on December 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book is much better at talking about anime fan culture than anime itself. If you're interested in knowing more about the films, there are better resources such as "Anime Explosion", "Samurai from Outer Space" or, for the more academically inclined, "Anime from Akira to Princess Mononoke"
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