Anna Karenina (Oxford World's Classics) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $9.95
  • Save: $1.00 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Anna Karenina (Oxford Wor... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: different cover, ok book, lots of cover and edgewear. oxford ed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Anna Karenina (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – July 15, 2008


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.95
$6.20 $2.99
$8.95 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Anna Karenina (Oxford World's Classics) + War and Peace (Oxford World's Classics) + Crime and Punishment
Price for all three: $22.35

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Series: Oxford World's Classics
  • Paperback: 872 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; Reissue edition (July 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199536066
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199536061
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 1.5 x 5.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #38,567 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Some people say Anna Karenina is the single greatest novel ever written, which makes about as much sense to me as trying to determine the world's greatest color. But there is no doubt that Anna Karenina, generally considered Tolstoy's best book, is definitely one ripping great read. Anna, miserable in her loveless marriage, does the barely thinkable and succumbs to her desires for the dashing Vronsky. I don't want to give away the ending, but I will say that 19th-century Russia doesn't take well to that sort of thing. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Russian --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

The characters and the love is phenomenally written.
Jay Dog
When we consider that it is conveyed in a work of fiction that is beyond great in itself we see the true magnitude of Tolstoy's achievement.
Bill R. Moore
It would be more interesting if it followed the reading and I expect that I will go back to it after I finish the entire book.
Susan Diamond

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
'Anna Karenina' is not just a window on a vanished time, place, and society - it is a lucid reflection on our own times and a spellbinding work of art. By taking us so intimately into the passions of Anna and the internal musings of Levin (just two out of a huge, colorful cast), Tolstoy creates an unforgettable exploration of happiness and sadness, conflict and peace, morals and emotions, mind and heart. Read this book for its wonderful story, Tolstoy's magically down-to-earth language, the subtly sketched characters - and the thoughts it is sure to provoke long after the last page.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By K.A. on September 9, 2012
Format: Paperback
I bought the Pevear-Volokhonsky translation when everyone went crazy for it, but I have to say that THIS translation makes Anna Karenina immediate and timeless to me. There's a distancing, objective tone to the Pevear-Volokhonsky translation that I don't care for. I'm glad, for their sake, that readers like it so much, but THIS is the translation I turn to.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By BemisReviewsBooks on October 6, 2009
Format: Paperback
I had no idea that there were so many versions of this novel. I just finished the Oxford Classics translation. It is highly readable and easy to understand. The authors' offer detailed notes regarding Russian history, a glossary of terms, and a complete listing of all characters at the end along with a detailed forward and intro section at the beginning.

Tolstoy obviously was a master at his craft. I loved the story for so many reasons but the main one is that all elements of the human condition in all its various forms are present in the story. Yep, this book has got it all and the themes are boundless, playing out in endless ways.

Anna, the title character is so completely tragic that watching her come undone is like watcing a train wreck in slow motion. It was apparent that there was to be no deviation from her horrific course and that seemed obvious very early on. Levin could be any one of us who has ever, even once, wondered Who Am I and Why Am I Here? He is the embodiment of human condition.

Yes it is a VERY long book, a commitment really. Read slowly, there is much to absorb. If you like endless and intricate detail such as 100 or so pages on mowing a great big meadow, this book is definitely for you.

BTW, after reading this, 100 pages is no longer a big deal. A book of this length cannot help but to make you a better reader and that is a gift that keeps of giving long after you have finished the story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By H. Schneider on April 20, 2011
Format: Paperback
`Anna Karenina' is the queen of fat novels. For all who are addicted to 19th century fiction, this is top of the heap, this is Ultima Thule. Nothing better was ever written anywhere in this genre: the broad canvas of a society novel with dozens of characters. If you have never read AK, you are in the lucky position to be able to discover it. If you did, you should re-read it about every 10 years. It is perfection. The novel is named after Anna Karenina, whom I will call Anna here, to distinguish her from the novel, AK.
Many movies have been made after AK (and I have read that a version with Keyra Knightley is coming out in 2012; previous Western faces to Anna were Sophie Marceau in the 90s and Jacqueline Bisset in the 80s; much earlier Vivien Leigh, and still earlier Greta Garbo). The movies and any short plot summary will easily mislead you to consider this some kind of upper class soap opera. It isn't.

AK's front line subject is adultery and various other permutations of love life in the Russia of the 1870s. We are mainly in the centers, Moscow and St.Petersburg, but we also spend time on farms, and in European tourist places, where Russian nobility was used to go for leisure.

Part One shows us complications in relationships: Anna's brother, a rather brainless sybarite, has endangered his marriage by an affair with a former governess. His friend Lewin, an over-serious rich farmer with boorish manners, has a crush on a younger woman. His rival is Vronsky, a young rascal from St.Petersburg's jeunesse dorée, Anna's lover-to-be. Anna is the neglected young wife of a respectable ice-cold older bore of a politician, VIP Karenin. And this is just the first part, one of eight.
Read more ›
33 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 12, 1999
Format: Paperback
I can't believe that I related to the book so well! The situations he created are almost shocking today so you can imagine what it was like in pre-revolution Russia. His characters are unforgetable and each unique. The book seemed to be more about Levin and his internal struggles rather than a woman torn.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Eric Robert Juggernaut VINE VOICE on August 23, 2009
Format: Paperback
Even though she is one of the main characters and was given the title by the author, Leo Tolstoy, Anna is not the focus of this novel. The epic is really about Konstantin Levin, a character whose story is told interspersed with that of Anna's, and who represents the author during his trials of spiritual disbelief and eventual reconciliation.

It is no wonder why so many prefer to see the book as Anna's. She is much more interesting than Levin: She is rebellious, passionate, and has an affair, whereas Levin is generally straight-laced, ambivalent, and is willing to struggle through any troubles he has with his only love and wife, Kitty. Levin is a Victorian Russian; Anna seems Post-Modern American.

People love her story because it is so modern, because they can relate. But for folks like me, hearing all the Anna-saturated descriptions of the book presented it in a negative light. I don't want to read about a promiscuous, self-destructive person, and how the evil society looks down on the poor creature. I wouldn't have pity on her if I were in the Moscow society in the 1870s either. For this reason I was skeptical of reading the masterpiece.

As I began to delve into it, however, I realized that Anna was just used as a contrast to the real storyline of Levin's. He might be considered bland for his proper behavior, but he is principled (evidenced by his respect for Kitty and care of his farm), and despite some serious doubt and disbelief, he is a character that the reader can get behind and support, quite unlike Anna, who we all know is hopeless.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?