Annals of Gullibility: Why We Get Duped and How to Avoid It and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $44.95
  • Save: $4.74 (11%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Friday, April 25? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by cjbooks03
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Hardback, dust cover has shelf/edge wear. Has writing/highlighting throughout.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $16.80
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Annals of Gullibility: Why We Get Duped and How to Avoid It Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-0313362163 ISBN-10: 0313362165 Edition: 1st

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$40.21
$36.21 $30.96

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Sell Us Your Books
Get up to 80% back when you sell us your books, even if you didn't buy them at Amazon. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Praeger; 1 edition (December 30, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0313362165
  • ISBN-13: 978-0313362163
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,115,742 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Annals of Gullibility provides some interesting examples of gullibility for people looking for such anecdotes, perhaps for a lecture or colloquium. The final chapter might also be useful reading for students or others who want to increase their resistance to persuasion and would be a valuable reading assignment for classes in related topics."

-

PsycCRITIQUES

Review

"Stephen Greenspan has penned the definitive book on why people are gullible. He reveals why so many people are so gullible, the psychology that drives gullible behaviors, and most importantly what we can do about it. Annals of Gullibility belongs on the bookshelves of skeptics and scientists, not to mention politicians and policy analysts, especially before they go to war."

(

Michael Shermer
Publisher, Skeptics Magazine

)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

In short, this book is as comprehensive as it is a delight to read.
Leon F. Seltzer, PhD
I don't argue that there is more than a little foolishness in the thinking of many religious people.
Jean E. Pouliot
The rest is up to you and some will always be down to things out of your control.
Tinny

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Philip Hine on May 7, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I bought and read this book thinking I would learn about a theory to explain gullibility. Instead I got a series of descriptions of people being gullible. I can think of the many times that I've been gullible. I don't need to learn that the phenomenon exists. The solutions proposed were not exciting. I did learn to be more careful when I order books.
I did not learn why I get duped and I should have avoided buying and reading this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jim Estill on April 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Most of the book is more entertaining (great dupes throughout history) than educational, but in the last chapter Greenspan outlines several rules to limit your vulnerability. Most of this review comes from Nate Collier.

Major Points

- Don't rush a big decision. Sleep on it. Life is too important not to have the benefit of reflection on the major choices of your life.

- Avoid high-pressure sales situations: The more you are pressured, the more you should be skeptical. Yes, you might, maybe, possibly, lose out on a good deal by taking your time. But it is much more likely you will avoid being duped.

- Admit your limitations. As you have your strengths, you also have your areas of vulnerability. Know them, accept them. No one can be an expert in everything. Just because you are knowledgeable in a certain area doesn't mean that you should not seek additional help and advice in that area. Remember, the saying "the lawyer who represents himself has a fool for a client," has broad application.

- Learn how to say no and buy time. Learn a few polite, universal phases to disengage from a situation. By practicing a few verbal time-buying, distancing tactics in advance, you may be able to exit quickly, easily, and smoothly. My favorite is a simple but firm "Not today, thank you," accompanied by whatever physical action is appropriate. Turning and walking away if in person, or hanging up without waiting for acknowledgement if on the phone.

- Adopt a "prove it" attitude. It is only smart to demand objective, impartial proof. A polite but skeptical attitude makes a good companion in life.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Alan J. Taddiken on January 10, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This other Greenspan has given us a highly accessible and useful primer on how a avoid--or at least protect against, both fooling oneself and being overly prone to the latest scam in our driven market free-for-all. Greenspan tells his narrative with considerable eloquence and a disarming tone of personal experience informed by a clear and convincing scholarship: an erudite wit and gentle guide if ever there was one. His book is quickly accessible to all but the most gullible--and serves as a relief to those of us gulled (and who among us lacks that trial?)--and as a tonic to prepare against those new temptations we will surely face. Finally, we have an adviser we can trust--a true green span to better behavior. I can only say: read it soon--and reread it often!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Leon F. Seltzer, PhD on October 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Rarely can a reader find a book having so much of value to say about a vital topic be, a the same time, such a good read. Full of the most interesting, curious, and edifying facts--as well as the most compelling examples and anecdotes--this amazingly wide-ranging study illuminates its subject way beyond anything done to date. It is to me a consummate example of a work that simultaneously educates and entertains, with scores of fascinating illustrations that demonstrate the regrettable ever-presence of gullibility.

With chapters covering every imaginable aspect of deception and fraud, Greenspan explores his topic as it's revealed in literature, folklore, finance, relationships, religion, war, politics, criminal justice, science,and academia. Reading this book should increase your sophistication about the world we live in at least threefold(!). It will also help to make you more prudent, circumspect, and wary--crucial characteristics if you're going to protect yourself from all the opportunistic "operators" (or predators) who may be lying in wait to take advantage of you. Definitely worth a 5-star rating.

Finally, contrary to what at least one earlier reviewer stated, Greenspan (whether directly or by implication) discusses the many ways an individual can become more resistant to being duped. His last two chapters in particular focus on this all-important issue. In short, this book is as comprehensive as it is a delight to read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Jean E. Pouliot on February 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I had two major problems with this book. One is that its definition of gullibility is so broad that it includes plain stupidity and unwitting ignorance. The book's analyses also lack subtlety. When US Senators gave George W. Bush broad powers to go to war against Iraq in 2003 -- based on incorrect intelligence -- was this gullibility? Could it not have been a reasoned assessment of facts by those who had no opportunity to learn them on their own? Could it not have been due to political positioning by presidential hopefuls who wanted to present themselves as strong and warlike? Could it be that the cognitive powers of the Senators were not what we might wish they were? Author Greenspan also seems to have it in for religious beliefs, writing about them as though they are self-evidently false, and their adherents gullible fools. I don't argue that there is more than a little foolishness in the thinking of many religious people. But it seems utterly facile to suggest that because some or even many religious people are gullible, then the object of religious belief must be non-existent. It's like saying that because so many who bet on horses make a hash of statistics, that probability theory is unreal.

My second major issue the "Annals of Gullibility" is that it is so derivative. Stephen Greenspan basically has read lots of books, and from these he has fashioned his own book on gullibility. This is not the same as a historian who researches primary documents to present a new synthesis of ideas. It is about an author who uncritically (gullibly?) reads a number of secondary and tertiary sources about a field in which he has no firsthand knowledge, then writes a book about them. This is a book that I, a non-academic but a prolific reader, could have written.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa3b9772c)