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Anne Morrow Lindbergh: First Lady of the Air Hardcover – October 31, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-1403969323 ISBN-10: 1403969329 Edition: First Edition

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Trade; First Edition edition (October 31, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1403969329
  • ISBN-13: 978-1403969323
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 1 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,307,600 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This biography focuses on Lindbergh's flying career, which she embarked upon after her 1929 marriage to Charles Lindbergh, already a hero for his historic nonstop transatlantic flight two years earlier. Drawing on an admirable array of research, aviation historian Winters documents how Charles trained his young wife to serve as copilot, navigator and radio operator on their long pioneering flights. In their new plane, Sirius, the Lindberghs set a speed record for flying from coast to coast. Winters details their flight to China and a five-month global survey flight that would advance commercial air travel, adventures that Anne (1906–2001) wrote about in North to the Orient and Listen, the Wind. It's clear that Anne fell in love with flying as well as with her husband, a driven, demanding man. Charles insisted that she fly while pregnant and argued for greater aviation challenges as their family grew. Though this is not a comprehensive biography, Winters deals briefly with the well-known aspects of Anne's life including the kidnapping and murder of the Lindberghs' first son and Charles's flirtation with Nazism. Anne's important role in early aviation has not been treated as extensively elsewhere. B&w photos, maps. (Nov.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Although numerous books have been written about Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Winters rightfully asserts that none has addressed her aviation achievements. With the assistance of Lindbergh's family, Winters is determined to show that Anne's contribution to her husband's aviation exploits was noteworthy in its own right and wrongfully eclipsed by his greater fame. She was one of the earliest female pilots, as well as the first American female glider pilot, and a radio operator who achieved numerous accolades for her service during the couple's long-distance flights. Winters shows in great detail that Lindbergh accomplished this under the glare of an unremitting spotlight, and in the company of an often-demanding spouse. That the author is able to bring something new to the Lindbergh story is impressive, and she does it through both technical explanations of Lindbergh's accomplishments and Anne's own words about her flying exploits, marriage, and writing. In Winters' beautifully written biography, Anne Morrow Lindbergh emerges as a more complete and relatable character then ever before, and an aviator long overdue for respect. Colleen Mondor
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Customer Reviews

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The author tells this part of her story, and tells it well.
Amazon Customer
Kathleen Winters has written fascinating book of Anne Morrow Lindbergh from both a historical and a feminine point of view.
Donna M. Justen
Originally in hardback, the book is due out in paperback spring 2008.
Sarah B. Rickman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Donna M. Justen on December 17, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Kathleen Winters has written fascinating book of Anne Morrow Lindbergh from both a historical and a feminine point of view. Taking her cue from Anne's own diaries and journals, she reveals that Anne was a person in her own right. She is not merely a follower of Charles, she is his right-hand woman,fearless in a world that has yet to be conquered. Aviation was in its infancy when she and Charles undertook the mission to discover possible routes to the far corners of the earth. Traveling over the Arctic Circle with them you can almost feel the bone-chilling cold experienced in their frail craft and you can feel the excitement as they are welcomed in exotic places. The maps themselves tell the incredible story of their journeys. I felt almost as though I were experiencing the cold of the Arctic and the fear that anything could happen as they were so out of touch with those on the ground. Anne's mastery of the Morse code was an invaluable asset as they crisscrossed the Atlantic, traveling to places we consider a normal journey now. The book opened my eyes to what a daring person she was. Factual and Fascinating!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 16, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This book works on several levels. It is a character study of the young Anne Morrow as she grows into a woman, marries a man the world worships, shares his adventures, and discovers her own voice through writing.

Simultaneously it is a graphic description of her flying career. Using the Lindberghs' logs, which previous authors ignored, Winters creates a picture of how aviation forged a deep bond between them. The author, a professional pilot, draws on her knowledge to vividly portray this neglected side of Anne Morrow's life.

Anne Morrow Lindbergh may be better known as an author, and the wife of Charles, than as an adventurous pilot. Other books cover her later work in much more depth. But it is flying that gave her the subject matter to begin her professional writing, and underpinned the rest of her life. The author tells this part of her story, and tells it well.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Leon Zeug on December 29, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This biography is an enlightened and fun read about an unassuming woman who flew when civil aviation was in its infancy, with air routes nonexistent until charted by pioneers like Anne and her husband Charles Lindbergh. Flying their single-engine plane, the Lindberghs traveled across oceans to five continents during the 1930s. They understood that aviation was more than dangerous attempts at setting records, but instead could provide reliable, speedy, and safe travel--except for hazardous weather conditions. Foul weather was a demon they struggled with throughout their flights, writes Kathleen Winters. She describes a leg on their Atlantic survey: "The flight would become another battle in rain, fog, and low ceilings--lasting nearly four hours. . . . Anne, meanwhile, desperately radioed for weather conditions." Winters, a pilot herself, uses her own aviation background to bring to life the book's many flying scenes. Also depicted are the conflicts Anne endured because of long absences from her family while flying as a committed partner with Charles. Ambitious and adventurous, Anne became a bestselling author after she ended her flying career. I found this biography entertaining and a page turner, moving quickly from one chapter to the next.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. Steve Adkins on November 4, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The compelling jacket photo of Anne Morrow Lindbergh sets the stage for a book that you will find difficult to put down. An absorbing narrative describes the major contributions of this celebrity, a little known aviation pioneer who began her flying career when she married Charles Lindbergh. I enjoyed discovering the interesting family backgrounds of both Charles and Anne.

Anne had decided to be involved in aviation before meeting Charles Lindbergh. She became a competent power pilot but most people are unaware that she was the first woman and tenth American to hold a first-class glider license. Even more intriguing, she became a competent radio operator and Morse code operator. The safety and success of the many long Lindbergh flights were due in large part to her navigation skills and radio skills in addition to her co-pilot duties. Kathleen Winters' description of their harrowing adventures as they flew untested routes above the Arctic Circle, the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean causes one to wonder why they survived when so many other aviation pioneers died as a result of their efforts.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Craig Matteson HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on November 7, 2007
Format: Hardcover
There was a time when Charles Lindbergh was the most famous man on Earth. His 1927 solo flight across the Atlantic caught the world's imagination and the public couldn't get enough of him. When he decided to get married he made looking for a wife into a project. Anne Morrow was the daughter of a wealthy and prestigious family and while Anne didn't quite take to Charles at first, it wasn't long until she was caught up in his charisma and the thrill of flying, and they were soon married.

Kathleen Winters has given us a very interesting biography of Anne that necessarily includes material on Charles, but usually from Anne's perspective. The subtitle of the book is "first lady of the air" and most of the book is about Anne's achievements as a pioneering woman in powered flight and gliding. The majority of the book focuses on two major expeditions Charles and Anne made to Asia in 1931 and all around the North and South Atlantic in 1933. Anne was not just along for the ride on these long and dangerous trips to open flying routes around the globe. As Charles noted when asked about taking his wife along on these hazardous flights, "she is crew". Anne operated the radio, used Morse code, and much more. The radio in those days was much more art than the standard technology it has become.

Winters provides great maps of these great journeys along with some terrific photographs. The revolutionary nature of these flights is made clear by the medal Anne was given by the National Geographic Society for her part in opening air routes around the globe.
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