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The New Oxford Annotated Bible, New Revised Standard Version with the Apocrypha, Third Edition (Hardcover 9700A) Hardcover – January 25, 2001


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 2180 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 3 Sub edition (January 25, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 019528478X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195284782
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.9 x 2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (86 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #36,998 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


From reviews of the previous edition:


"The New Oxford Annotated Bible with its excellent footnotes and concise introductory materials has a thoroughness and clarity that should prove invaluable to the lay reader and scholar alike."--Frederick Buechner


"I know of no other annotated Bible that is as rich as The New Oxford in both the precision of its textual notes and the clarity and helpfulness of its introductions. It will be and extraordinarily useful edition to have on one's library shelf."--Andrew M. Greeley


About the Author

Michael Coogan is Professor of Religious Studies at Stonehill College in Easton, Massachusetts, and director of publications for the Harvard Semitic Museum. Carol Newsom is at Candler School of Theology, Atlanta, Georgia.

Customer Reviews

Ther book itself is better looking than the 1994 edition.
collectivité
The Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocrypha is an excellent vehicle to read and understand God's word.
"ccbutcher@aol.com"
It has made reading the bible a totally different experience for me.
E. Pritchard

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

318 of 334 people found the following review helpful By George L. Beiler on February 25, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Oxford has greatly improved its New Annotated Study Bible. The notes are far more extensive than in previous editions. In addition to including the complete text of the NRSV in an easy-to-read typeface, this new edition contains notes pointing out information and meanings which are not obvious from just reading the text and, in places, indicating meanings from the underlying Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek texts which are not evident in the NRSV translation.
The notes are entirely scholarly and do not attempt to teach any religious doctrine.
In places, the NOAB Third Edition is less thorough in its notes than the competing HarperCollins Study Bible, but the notes are better written and far less tedious to read.
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458 of 484 people found the following review helpful By Eric Krupin on July 8, 2003
Format: Hardcover
When the Oxford University Press labels this an "ecumenical" study bible, it's not kidding. The Apocrypha are included, naturally. (You don't have to read them, of course, but you will have to pay for them.) But the Old Testament is also respectfully referred to as "The Hebrew Bible". And all dates are given as BCE/CE rather than BC/AD. The annotations are just as scrupulously free of denominational bias. Of course, the only way it can manage that is by avoiding religious interpretation altogether. This makes the book less useful to those looking for an in-depth treatment of their particular faith, I suppose. But that's also what makes it invaluable to those of who are still "waiting in the hall" - as C.S. Lewis put it. That, combined with the title's decades of acceptance by men far more learned in the subject than I (and just the general classiness of the OUP), means I *trust* this Bible as I do no other I've seen on the market - as one can only trust someone who isn't trying to sell you anything. And, without wading too far into the muddy and turbulent waters of the translation issue, let me register my opinion that the New Revised Standard Version used here strikes me as the most literal translation that can still be considered good English. (It doesn't read with the absolute clarity of a good thought-for-thought version like the Good News Translation, but it far excels the New American Standard Bible - generally considered the single most literal English version - and the mega-popular but lamentable New International Version, which doesn't even have all-out-literalism as an excuse.)
Furthermore, as a specimen of book manufacture, the New Oxford Annotated Bible is a giant among dwarves. The uncluttered double columns of text [11-pt.
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81 of 86 people found the following review helpful By LKN on November 15, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I've read a couple of Bible translations now, and with most of them, they're written for religon. Which makes sense. That was never why I was reading them, however; I've always looked at the Bible in a more literary or philosophical way.
This particular version marked the end of my search for a Bible. I bought it for a class this semester, but found myself reading up on the Apocrypha and the neglected books in my precious spare time. The translation is fully detailed in the copious footnotes and introductions at the beginning of each book. Nuances in language, shifts in dialouge, it's all explained nicely, so you don't need to speak Greek and Hebrew to get it all.
Whether you're doing what I did, and studying the Bible, or if you're looking for a religious text, or both, this is definitely the way to go.
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54 of 57 people found the following review helpful By PaladinValer on October 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The NOAB 3rd Edition with the Apocrypha (NRSV text) ranks right up there with my HarperCollins Study Bible (also NRSV with the Deuterocanon).

The NRSV is perhaps the best translation available, even after 15 years from its print in 1989. Its combination of the formal equivalence translation method coupled with "idiomatic-correctness" in areas such as gender neutrality make it such an accurate translation. The fact that the Study Bible comes with the Deuterocanon of both the Western (ie: Vatican Catholic) and Eastern (ie: Eastern Orthodox) Churches makes it truly, as it professes, an "ecumenical study bible." Any person from these or any other liturgical church, from my Anglicanism to Oriental Orthodoxy, can really benefit from this.

The notes and introductions are spectacular; well-written, well argued, and well professed. I particularly enjoyed the nearly 100 pages of additional essays in the back, which makes up for its lack of "titles" between chief sections within the text (for example, "Creation" followed by "Another Account of Creation" or anything to that effect). Its maps, tables, and graphs are quite useful, and its nice to finally have a small concordance in the back of one of my Study Bibles.

Many argue that the annotations are "ungodly;" I must disagree completely and believe those who say such are only upset because they want everything in them to agree with what they think. I even don't always agree with the annotations, but then again, they aren't the Scriptures but aides to help one understand the Scriptures better. And to the most part, they are refreshing, well-documented in the social sciences as fact, and of tremendous help.

I would recommend this Study Bible to any seriously wishing to know the Bible better. I have absolutely no regrets for purchasing this most amazing Study Bible and have told many of my friends to get one ASAP!
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