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Another Fine Math You've Got Me Into-- Paperback – July 1, 1992


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 269 pages
  • Publisher: W.H. Freeman & Company; First Edition edition (July 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0716723417
  • ISBN-13: 978-0716723417
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,504,423 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Charles Ashbacher HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 14, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The author is the comedic equal of the team associated with the title. Puns fly fast and furious, and the slow of wit will not catch them all. A master of the verbal slapstick, his wit makes you simultaneously grin and groan. The worthy successor to Martin Gardner in writing a regular mathematics column for `Scientific American', he is the clown prince of mathematics.
Some of the catchy titles and subjects are:

1. Tile and error, tiling a rectangular surface.
2. Knights of the flat torus, about knight tours of a chessboard.
3. Another vine math you've got me into, a combinatorial problem of planting several varieties of grapes in plots so that all pairs are together in one and only one plot, etc.
4. Sofa, so good, on moving a sofa through tight places.

All subjects are presented with clarity and thoroughly resolved by the end of the chapter.
This work is the rarest of mathematical books. It presents solid, sophisticated mathematics in a manner that people could read just for the jokes. A vine piece of work.

Published in Journal of Recreational Mathematics, reprinted with permission.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Duwayne Anderson on March 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
Thirty five years ago my high school (Thomas Jefferson, in Federal Way, Washington) held annual competitions in mathematics. They did it in the form of a test that came bound in a small white booklet, just was a few pages long. There weren't many questions, perhaps a dozen or two (usually in the form of story problems), but they required deep thought and concentration (at least for me). I still remember the feeling of excitement and trepidation as I took the "white book" and opened it to the first problem. Several hours later I'd consider myself accomplished if I'd managed to completely answer more than half the questions.

Ian Stewart's book reminds me of those tests. Here's a sampling of what's inside:

1)Mrs. Anne-Lida Worm decides she wants a new couch, and tells Mr. Worm to get it for her, while she goes shopping for a new tight for baby Wermintrude. But Anne-Lina doesn't want just any couch. She wants the biggest possible couch that can be carried down the hall in their house, and around the 90-degree hall at the end. What shape does the couch have, and how big is it? This is a truly riveting story. Will Mr. Worm solve the couch problem in time?

2)Alberto wants to conduct tests on grapes, evaluating the influence of different soils. He wants to conduct experiments to see how different soils and exposure to the sun affects the quality of wine. His land is on a hillside, though, which is narrow, so he can plant only three varieties of grape on each plot of land. How can he arrange things so that he tests all seven varieties of grapes when they are arranged so that each plot contains exactly three different species, where any two plots have exactly one variety in common, and any two varieties lie in exactly one common plot?
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By NancyMiller on June 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is one of the best recreational math books I have ever read. The humorous real life scenarios lead to deep mathematical concepts. I use this book in a class for future mathematics teachers. Hopefully, it will inspire them to make math fun for their students.
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