Another Self Portrait (1969-1971): The Bootleg Series, Vol. 10

August 27, 2013 | Format: MP3

$18.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:00
30
2
2:02
30
3
2:16
30
4
2:37
30
5
3:51
30
6
2:22
30
7
2:18
30
8
3:25
30
9
1:39
30
10
2:25
30
11
2:44
30
12
4:06
30
13
4:49
30
14
3:43
30
15
2:26
30
16
5:59
30
17
1:15
Disc 2
30
1
2:29
30
2
2:18
30
3
3:10
30
4
5:13
30
5
3:43
30
6
1:27
30
7
3:31
30
8
3:39
30
9
3:35
30
10
3:58
30
11
3:51
30
12
3:49
30
13
4:10
30
14
4:04
30
15
3:33
30
16
2:35
30
17
3:02
30
18
3:53

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: August 23, 2013
  • Release Date: August 23, 2013
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:52:57
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00EP2GHMO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #40,200 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

I have seen Dylan twice and he is always good.
Brian Pernick
Bottom line, I give this one 2 stars---4 stars for the Isle of Wight concert, 1 star each for the other 2 discs, an average of 2 stars per disc.
Norman "Chuck" Zimmerman
Some of the songs you probably have never heard of, but just to hear the young voice makes them worthwhile.
Michael E. Salter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Steve Dossey on August 27, 2013
Format: MP3 Music
First Dylan's piano/keyboard playing is outstanding. Almost all the vocals are moving, heartfelt and free of pretense. With the exception of If Not For You and Sign on the Window, I prefer the New Morning original album cuts. If Not for You (stellar version/great piano,) Spanish is a Loving Tongue, Copper Kettle and These Hands are truly amazing....Working on a Guru w/ Harrison is a treat...There are four cuts I would have not put on this collection: Time Passes Slowly #2, New Morning with horn section, In Search for Little Sadie, Highway 61: they are nothing special.....Also would have liked to have added some outtakes from the Dylan/Cash Nashville Skyline sessions.....all in all, however a big refreshing surprise....
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18 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Mark D. Burgh on August 27, 2013
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
Dare I say this: had this version of Self-Portait come out in 1970, the world would have been changed. The centrality of Dylan to the ethos of the 1960's was such that whatever he said, did, or sang defined the era, became not only the topic of major discussion but a force of musical influence. In 1966, Dylan probably faked a motorcycle accident to get out of the overwhelming touring and cultural responsibilities he found himself enmeshed in. While the musical world moved on, Dylan rusticated, returning to his folky roots for two quiet albums: John Wesley Hardin and Nashville Skyline. The original Self-Portrait came out to legendary disapprobation and profound dismay. Indeed, what was one to make of the mess that the album was? Some strong material, some weak, some strange, but mostly lacking any form of unity. The crash of the utopian dream of 1960's came soon after.

Now, after the smoke has cleared, Dylan's bootleg series releases what amounts to Self-Portrait Naked (like Let it Be Naked), stripped of background singers, horns, and other disruptive elements, what is left is an album that now has that elusive unity the original missed. Now we have a powerful document of Dylan's America, a statement of simplicity, of passion, and of Dylan's eternal questioning and comedy. Mostly in an atmosphere of pre-modern America, the songs look back to a history that never was as idyllic as some might say, a history that American folk music has always known, but that most mainstream culture homogenizes. The urgency of this music recalls the best of early Dylan while showing his steady maturation. No longer so obscure as on Highway 61 and Blonde on Blonde, his lyrics replace bravura poetry with intense conversation.

Dylan listeners, of whom there were legion, would have been relieved to buy this album in 1970, yet another Talmud to guide a generation searching for something, rather than the original, which was merely a puzzle with no answers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bring_back_the_60s on September 22, 2013
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
When I put in CD 1 into the player I was immediantly impressed with the beautiful demo Went To See The Gypsy. This demo is far greater than anything that was on the original Self Portrait and this is only the 1st track !
CD 1 continues with many brilliant tracks with a more acoustic guitar and bass/organ mix and less overblown extra's the original album had. This is a revelation for me as I prefer Dylan's albums such as Blood On The Tracks and my favourite The Billy The Kid Soundtrack.
This set of songs is a treasure trove of Dylan that has pleasantly surprised many fans with the more simpler mixes that bring out Bob Dylan's songwriting and his voice has never sounded better.
I am very impressed with the vocals, the great guitar playing and beautiful melodies.
CD 2 contains more tracks of tracks from Self Portrait in remixed form. Even a few tracks from Isle Of Wight 1969 that were previously unreleased.
This is a great collection of hidden gems from the master.
On the downside the booklet is a disappointment with poorly written notes by someone who had originally hated Self Portrait. I would have liked to have read some notes by someone who actually gives a damn.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Marley on September 11, 2013
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
It's taken more than 40 years but finally we can realize the promise of the Great White Wonder. Well Here it is in all its splendor. No, All The White Horses no longer sound like some cheep western movie intro. Rejoice this is not your fathers old..."My God he sounds like Jim Neighbors" recording. Here we are a fly on the wall in a studio up in West Saugerties, NY treated to an early take on just about anything Bob was doing between '69-'71. Listen, relive this glorious stuff from the golden age.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael E. Salter on September 4, 2013
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Interesting accumulation of outtakes, different versions, sometimes different lyrics, of our beloved "Song and Dance" man.
Some of the songs you probably have never heard of, but just to hear the young voice makes them worthwhile.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Joey Bee on August 28, 2013
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
OK, do you know "Wigwam", on Self-Portrait? It's bizarre, it's Dylan singinging "lala's" over a track with some guitar and piano, but what mostly grabs you is the over the top orchestration. Seriously, it's so weird, so out there, that it's no more than a novelty song.

Ah, but then we have "Wigwam" on "Another Self-Portrait" - the orchestration is gone, and the song now comes across as something you'd sing at a campfire, very sweet, stripped down and charming. And that's the way it is with much of this album - songs like "Belle Isle" lose the orchestra and come across as very tender and moving, which is perhaps what Dylan intended originally.

There's a lot of other interesting music here as well, and you get a window into what "New Morning" might have been like had the reaction to Self-Portrait been different. The overdubs on songs like "New Morning" and "Sign on the Window" give us different looks at them, and a version of "Time Passes Slowly" that sounds a lot like Joe Cocker's "A Little Help from my Friends" is a hoot.

It's amazing how Dylan is able to give us gems even 40 years after they were stored away and perhaps written off. "Tell Tale Signs", which covered his more recent rarities and outtakes showed that gems come from even the most unexpecting places. Dylan has rehabilitated this era; are the Gospel years next?
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