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Another Space in Time Paperback – March 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 150 pages
  • Publisher: Richard Bunning (March 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0956293735
  • ISBN-13: 978-0956293732
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,304,620 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Author

This is the first of a "couplet" of books that tell the story of Rodwell Richards time on the planet Axa-Goranas. Both can be read and enjoyed independently of the other. The books are first and foremost  near future and parallel time adventure fiction, which also dabble in every-man "meaning of life philosophy, the psychology of estrangement, moral degradation, and religious reappraisal resulting from fundamental change of circumstance. The second book is scheduled for publishing in the winter of 2011-2012. 
The Earth Trash Terminators look to have such a strong grip on the State of Albion that they are sure to destroy Rodwell. Will he survive into the chapters of "Another Space in Time, Returns"? We shall see.

From the Back Cover

The story of Rodwell Richard's death and "rebirth" into a parallel dimension, opened my mind to questions about humanity's place in the multiverse of space. This story's author has faithfully recorded for me many of the vivid memories I "inherited", along with Rodwell's donated heart. My eyes have long failed me, but Rodwell's story never dims. As my time here draws to a close, I feel that I owe it to this world to leave a record of Rodwell's adventure for all to read. One won't get a glimpse of Heaven, nor thankfully Hell, though one might gain some hope of a long road yet to be travelled when faithful hearts stop beating. Of course humans are just humans, even with the gift of "rebirth": imperfect souls one and all. We see into a world as corrupted and divided as our own, as we share Rodwell's struggle to overome terrorists, and police who have him labelled with murder. The struggles of a migrant across space and time, have a resonance with the fears of any new citizen immersed in an unfamiliar culture. 
Enjoy this story as a fairy-tale, speculative fiction, or whatever you choose. As is yours, my mind is my only truth. 
Arthur Fieldman, Carlton Heath, Nethertown, Lincolnshire.

More About the Author

I don't know what is really needed here. The important stuff for readers is that for now I'm writing speculative science fiction, and short mixed genre flash fiction. I have done some adaptations of neoclassical plays in the past. All the rest is fairly big headed stuff. You are welcome to read on, but you must note that you have been forewarned. I am currently very fortunate to live in one of the most fortunate places on Earth- Switzerland. Well until retirement age, then I will be in peril of being slung out. The audacious belief that I could make my way in life as an author began in earnest in the winter of 1965, when I turned nine. This passion lasted at least until the freedom of the summer holidays. Of course I dreamed of being the action-hero as well, but the rotten luck of being born rather later than Biggles, and of being too myopic and astigmatic to pass the eyesight tests required of military pilots, ruled out any such heroic future. The honour of flying with James Bigglesworth fell, in my young mind, to the very real figure of my paternal grandfather, Flying Officer Jim Bunning of the RFC. I meanwhile countered my misfortune with the idea that I could at least be the recorder of the adventures by becoming the natural successor to the writing of Captain W.E. Johns. Early interest in adventure books and tall-stories was tempered by the requirement to reorganise my dyslexic mind. A style of education borrowed directly from Tom Brown's 1830s schooling, applied with vigour to my shortcomings, did eventually result in this maladroit malefactor being fitted with a proper education. I was rounded off in rather more sympathetic fashion in the then still-used Nissan huts of the blossoming University of Keele. Thirty years on and the micro-chipped world of today facilitates the almost complete submergence of any remaining linguistic chaos, and so allows me in middle age to chase the essence of a long submerged dream. If I must write, and I must, shouldn't I be penning violent adventure stories? They are hopefully still in me to emerge in the very peak of my new career. Should I be playing with the works of lyrical Racine, or are they a challenge too far? Perhaps I have plunged a little deep into linguistic art, but there is at least logic in looking to the best from which to learn the craft of the wordsmith.
In practice I have left my attacks on classic works behind me and plunged deep into the future. I am currently a writer of speculative science fiction, with two titles running- "Another Space in Time" and "Another Space in Time, Returns". My third Spiderworld may appear as early as the middle of 2013, time will tell. If you have read this far I feel very flattered. Thank you.

Customer Reviews

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A wonderful read, with wonderful discussions and thought-provoking ideas from its brilliant author.
Louis Tyrrell
There are characters you care about, tension in the narrative as the story unfolds, and intelligent believable dialogue.
CamAL
I recommend this book to fans of `50s pulp sci-fi and readers who enjoy a literary edge to their science fiction.
Lisa Lane

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jeannie Walker (Award-Winning Author) on November 29, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I highly recommend this novel to anyone who likes to question philosophical concepts. The author is an intelligent gentleman who knows how to give us food for thought in many ways. I love the details he weaves of a planet that may just exist between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, but is probably in a different dimension where the sun just switches off at night. I also liked the love story that was intertwined in the writing that is without any blemishes or imperfections. The author makes us wonder about life after death. Another Space in Time is a very refreshing and interesting science fiction novel. I hope you read it when you get a chance and learn about the main character's rebirth.

Jeannie Walker - Award Winning Author of "Fighting the Devil" - A True Story of Consuming Passion, Deadly Poison, and Murder
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tui Allen on January 5, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was so different to any other SF I've read, and it gripped me from the start. The main character's utter confusion at finding himself naked in a different world was believable and I felt empathy.
The world itself was fascinating with plants, creatures and environments, like but unlike the ones we know on Earth. As a New Zealander, I was personally delighted to meet live moas "with attitude" on Goranas. Moas are huge flightless birds unique to my country, but now sadly extinct, (except on Goranas.) Goranas's giant constrictor snakes were interesting, specially when you can step over one while mistaking it for a log.

The astronomical arrangements between Goranas and its pulsar star were about as different from Earth's as you could imagine and yet producing similar conditions for life to thrive in. This sun did not set; it simply went out for the night. I'd heard of pulsar stars but it takes a clever fiction writer like Richard Bunning to contrive a plausible way for it to work out as a "home" star suitable for human life.
I easily identified with the character Rodwell and enjoyed seeing him develop gradually through the story from a confused and vulnerable naked new "arrival" to a dangerous force to be reckoned with towards the end. I grew to like him and felt sure he would later honour his debts to those who freely helped him when he was in dire straits.
Bunning handled the religious aspects of the story well, in a way that encouraged faith while discouraging fear and religious discord. It got you thinking about life after death and wondering what kind of world might be waiting for each of us somewhere out there in the universe.
The story's voice was unusual in its formal style.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. Johnson C. Eng on November 25, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
`Another Space In Time' by Richard Bunning is an odd book to begin with, written in a very stilted, formal style that I found difficulty with until I remembered those excellent 50's sci-fi paperbacks and their outlandish ideas slipped in under the veneer of their own period's restrained prose. When I looked again at the cover, though, it all made sense. Yes, it is, intentional or otherwise, a clever evocation of that period's often refreshingly new and provocative thoughts delivered in an honest if somewhat dry manner - imagine Clement Attlee putting his pipe down and then telling you about a time he visited another planet!

Delivered in the first person it leaves a lot for the reader to do to find empathy with the main character, Rodwell, something I never really managed myself. I also found problems making the other characters really come alive in my own mind but this really isn't an issue because the main strength of the work is in the ideas the story carries, and here I was roundly rewarded.

An apparently classic `journey to another world' tale, although on this occasion after Rodwell's own death by assassination, it forms framework for a number of intriguing ideas, the strongest and most novel, in my experience, the justification of God - nice twist that one and well worked out. Richard also expounds extensively on what he sees as inviolable tenets and principles applicable to both worlds and puts a nice `otherworld' slant on them but I found he tended to labour some of the ideas. It was sometimes a shame really for I felt brevity would have given his arguments the sharper edge they deserved.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Lane on September 26, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Heart transplant recipient Arthur Feldman serves as a frame narrator, sharing an otherworldly story he maintains was experienced by his organ donor, Rodwell Richards. The story begins with Rodwell's shooting, then shifts to a surreal alternate reality as Rodwell's consciousness leaves his body. Instead of going to Heaven, Purgatory, or Hell, Rodwell finds himself in a strange world--reborn, as it were, into a new life in a universe enigmatically connected to Earth. His experiences are interrupted by intermittent breaks back into "reality" in the form of nightmares--visions and sensations of being in a hospital room, barely clinging to life, the voice of his wife desperately trying to come to terms with his comatose condition. Over time, Rodwell becomes increasingly involved and connected with this new world, until the new life replaces the old, suggesting that there is no afterlife, but rather jumps from one universe to the next.

Another Space in Time is a refreshing and provocative look at our world and the world beyond, speculating existence, purpose, and God in thoughtful and meaningful ways. At times, Bunning's style seemed similar to that of Olaf Stapledon, one of my favorite speculative fiction authors. I recommend this book to fans of `50s pulp sci-fi and readers who enjoy a literary edge to their science fiction.
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