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Ant and Grasshopper Hardcover – March 8, 2011


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 2
  • Lexile Measure: 610L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry Books (March 8, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416951407
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416951407
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #742,562 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Amazon Best Books of the Month, March 2011: Ant and Grasshopper picks up Aesop’s well-worn fable, The Ant and the Grasshopper, and gives it an added twist. Day in and day out, Ant meticulously counts the beans, raisins, and other goodies he's been saving for the winter, while outside Grasshopper plays his fiddle, sings his songs, and extols Ant to come enjoy the summer sunshine. As in Aesop's, when the cruel winter comes Grasshopper begs Ant to save him for he has not prepared food or shelter. This is where the stories diverge. In Luli Gray’s version, after shutting the door on Grasshopper, Ant has a dream that awakens an appreciation for Grasshopper's musical bounty and he rushes to Grasshopper's rescue. While the original moral message about working hard and planning ahead still comes across, Ant and Grasshopper also reminds readers that valuing others' talents and showing compassion brings the greatest reward of all--friendship.--Seira Wilson

From School Library Journal

K-Gr 2-Industrious Ant and pesty, music-loving Grasshopper move beyond Aesop's pointed lesson on negligence to a quite different moral as Gray further develops their relationship in this engaging, extended story. The plot unfolds in familiar fashion but with considerably more dialogue and character development. Ant is a rich, hardworking, bean-counting fellow. Grasshopper is a bothersome distraction. "It's June, Ant! The sun is warm; the sky is blue. Come out and dance...." Ferri expands the funin fulsome watercolor scenes of Ant's glowing home and the changing seasons beyond his door and windows. The sturdy comic insects, Grasshopper in a jaunty cap and Ant in visor and spectacles on a chain, have expressive eyes and body language. The traditional dichotomy begins to shift as the changing seasons bring quieter times. Ant finds himself distracted in his counting as "fragments of rhyme and wisps of music jangled about in his head." Grasshopper is turned away with a slammed door when he first turns up cold and hungry. "Hah!... I warned you. You danced and sang all summer, while respectable folk worked hard for a living, and it serves you right." Ah, but Ant has more to him than a hard heart, and his mood and his sleep are now disturbed. The old tale has a new implied moral about empathy and friendship as the two unlikely fellows learn to care for each other when Grasshopper nearly perishes in the snow. The humorous, fluent telling and pictures would pair well with terse Aesop versions and stand on their own, offering especially nice read-aloud fare.-Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Robert W. on June 1, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you buy this book to teach your child the importance of hard work and planning ahead you are in for a big disappointment! Instead of the Grasshopper learning the virtues of hard work and planning ahead, the ant is presented as greedy, lacking an appreciation of the arts and needing to learn how to share. That's right the hard-working ant, the hero of the original, NEEDS TO LEARN HOW TO SHARE?!?!?!
With subversions like this, how can we hope to teach our children the importance of working hard to build a life for themselves and their families?
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By John D. Cochran on March 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I find it incredulous that the political philosophy of entitlement, "fair share", and socialist political ideology is packaged into a colorful and enticing children's book. The Orwellian characters Napoleon and Squealer would be most proud of Luli Gray's corruption of the philosophic works of Aesop; trading the thought that hard work pays off in life and necessitating that the "haves" should pay for the "have nots" for the betterment of society. I find it reprehensible that this hardline political stance is being targeted to such a young audience (ages 4 and up). If we are to follow this train of thought then we must also accept that Pied Piper of Hamlin (also a musician who worked hard to hone his skills) should have volunteered his services as opposed to demanding payment for work or the boy who cried wolf was the victim of a self-absorbed parents and was crying out for needed attention. In an interview with Ms. Gray she talks about hating Aesop's original fable which was her father's favorite. I think that this is an attempt to not only lash out at a parent wanting to instill values but an attempt to save other children from similar fates. If you are going to buy this book, buy it as an example that Orwell's Animal Farm is more than a colorful allegory, it is real and occurring every day.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Really?! on March 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover
For those wishing to read this book, please do. Those wishing to add it to their collection for their children, I encourage you to first read the original Ant and Grasshopper story. Gray's story is an not merely different from the original story, but conveys an entirely opposite lesson to be learned. In Gray's version the hard working ant is instead a miserly fellow who is obcessed with his preparations (wealth). While the formerly lazy grasshopper, is just merely living a free life. When the harsh winter hits, the grasshopper is unprepared and it is the ant's fault because he will not share his wealth. The story ends with the ant learning how to live the free life from the grasshopper, while the grasshopper learns.... yep that's right, he learns nothing. The point of the book is that the ant is wrong and grasshopper is right. I can't possibly think of a more worse lesson for our children to learn about responsibility than this book. Just imagine every hollywood movie where the uptight, do-gooder learns to smoke pot from the slacker and discovers himself in a new context, and you got it.
Now the critics. Yes, it's a kids book. But this is a kids book based on a very well known tale that is meant to teach a very specific lesson. Imagine re-writing the three little pigs, with the lesson being that the pig with the stone house was the bad guy and the wolf, just down on his luck. Or the tortoise and the hare, where the Hare was the hero. My absolute disappointment here is that overwhelmingly this book tries to re-program the fundamental purpose of the fable. Pretty sad.
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32 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Jane Parks on March 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover
A beautifully written and illustrated version of the fable 'The Grasshopper and The Ant' with a personal twist. The well crafted use of language in combination with the beautiful and expressive pictures is what makes this book come alive. Many parents will identify with the theme of the story and it may set the stage for some meaningful discussions with children anywhere between 3 and 10. It might even help adults to think outside the box for a few minutes! I especially loved the last line! Read it out loud. You won't be disappointed!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Paul J. Beaumont Macaione on April 5, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It is a sign of the times when a book can be titled "the Grass Hopper and the Ant" a story well known for teaching the rewards of the principled hard work and in fact tell a story of a miserly rich unhappy ant that learns to sing and dance from an undisciplined homeless by choice grass hopper. And then be marketed and sold at a reputable book retailer like Amazon.
The lesson I got was next time I purchase a classic children's book from Amazon with a familiar title like say "Beauty and the Beast". I will do the work of making sure that the tile is what's in it. So when I share it with my family I am not embarrassed by the fraudulent content and expose them to something quite different then represented by the tile. =)
Revisionist Crap Save Your Money
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Rich Ahlgrim on November 18, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is Garbage! What does this teach our children? That they can play all day and expect some one else to provide for them?!
Lieberalism is a sickness!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By NoMoSTi on February 6, 2014
Format: Hardcover
If you enjoy indoctrinate you child with the lovable tales of Karl Marx, then you love the new and improved twist to this 500 year old classic. Gone are the days of teaching children that you should always be prepared for the future. Now we learn that we should just sing and dance. It's ok...the guberment will take care of use. At least I have something to start my next fire with...
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