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32 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars not vol.1,but still great
I agree the first volume had some stronger stuff,(try matching "Loan me a Dime"anywhere),but it is a bit overkill on lots of stuff I already had.If you're a fan,you already own the Allman Bros.tracks and "Layla"etc.This volume has more rarities and unreleased songs.Worth owning for Johnny Jenkins"Walk On Guilded Splinters"and Herbie Manns"Push Push".More guitar brilliance...
Published on February 1, 2006 by R. McSpadden

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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Milking His Legacy Dry
For some reason, I missed An Anthology, Vol. 2 when it was first issued. I wasn't even aware that it existed until it popped up in my recommendations one day after I reviewed some other 1960s blues-rock. I liked Vol. 1 well enough in its day, so I decided to take the plunge and order this. Well, like another reviewer opined, I should have stuck with An Anthology, Vol. 1...
Published on November 12, 2008 by Kurt Harding


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32 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars not vol.1,but still great, February 1, 2006
By 
R. McSpadden "Bobby McSpadden" (Elm Springs, Arkansas United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Anthology 2 (Audio CD)
I agree the first volume had some stronger stuff,(try matching "Loan me a Dime"anywhere),but it is a bit overkill on lots of stuff I already had.If you're a fan,you already own the Allman Bros.tracks and "Layla"etc.This volume has more rarities and unreleased songs.Worth owning for Johnny Jenkins"Walk On Guilded Splinters"and Herbie Manns"Push Push".More guitar brilliance from the late,great Skydog.Cant beat it!
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How is this possible?, November 5, 2005
By 
This review is from: Anthology 2 (Audio CD)
How is it possible that a man who was only around for a few years and only made music professionaly for fewer years could have two carear spanning anthologies? This is something I would expect to be made for Jimmy Page but the fact that two, two disc anthologies are made for this man not only astounds me but makes me happy. Duane was original and still to this day is one of the greatest guitar players ever, easily the best as far as slide goes.

With both anthologies in my collection its easy to see, this the second far better. This goes deeper into the mans music showing his skills not only as a songwriter ('Happily Married Man') and as a musician. As soon as the very first Allman Brothers record was released Duane became themost wanted studio musician at the time. This is what we mostly see here, with great Allman Brothers songs as well as rare studio cuts and work with other artist.

Songs like 'Matchbox' 'Dimples' and 'Waiting For The Train' show why Duane is such a legend. other incomplete tracks like the opener 'Happily Married Man' evoke thoughts of wonder. Every time I listen to something with Duane on it I cant help but think, what could have been? At least we have the music forever.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Impressive, February 1, 2007
By 
T. Kim (Nashville, TN) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Anthology 2 (Audio CD)
Not as good as volume #1 but still amazing guitar playing and a great collaboration of other amazing musicians.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars JAPAN REMASTERS OF BOTH ANTHOLOGY ALBUMS NOW AVAILABLE, July 10, 2008
By 
BOB (LOS ANGELES, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Anthology 2 (Audio CD)
Universal Japan has issued new '08 remasters of both Anthology and Anthology II, both in LP-replica mini-sleeves of the original album covers, and both complete with replicas of the original booklets.

It's great to finally have improved-audio versions of both of these fabulous compilations, but what just knocked my socks off was the remastered "Loan Me A Dime". This track now sounds better than any other CD ever released, including the '97 Scaggs Anthology. I've always loved that song, and now it sounds like you're standing in the room when they recorded it; you won't believe the increased clarity of the drums, or the awesome bass-drum kick on this version.

The price of both of these sets will probably take your breath away, but you can find them direct from Tokyo retailers, or eBay, for nearly half the price Amazon is charging for them. Just don't delay in buying them, as all mini-sleeves are limited edition.

WHAT IS A JAPAN "MINI-LP-SLEEVE" CD?

Have you ever lamented the loss of one of the 20th Century's great art forms, the 12" vinyl LP jacket? Then "mini-LP-sleeve" CD's may be for you.

Mini-sleeve CDs are manufactured in Japan under license. The disc is packaged inside a 135MM X 135MM cardboard precision-miniature replica of the original classic vinyl-LP album. Also, anything contained in the original LP, such as gatefolds, booklets, lyric sheets, posters, printed LP sleeves, stickers, embosses, special LP cover paper/inks/textures and/or die cuts, are precisely replicated and included. An English-language lyric sheet is always included, even if the original LP did not have printed lyrics.

Then, there's the sonic quality: Often (but not always), mini-sleeves have dedicated remastering (20-Bit, 24-Bit, DSD, K2/K2HD, and/or HDCD), and can often (but not always) be superior to the audio on the same title anywhere else in the world. There also may be bonus tracks unavailable elsewhere.

Each Japan mini-sleeve has an "obi" ("oh-bee"), a removable Japan-language promotional strip. The obi lists the Japan street date of that particular release, the catalog number, the mastering info, and often the original album's release date. Bonus tracks are only listed on the obi, maintaining the integrity of the original LP artwork. The obi's are collectable, and should not be discarded.

All mini-sleeve releases are limited edition, but re-pressings/re-issues are becoming more common (again, not always). The enthusiasm of mini-sleeve collecting must be tempered, however, with avoiding fake mini-sleeves manufactured in Russia and distributed throughout the world, primarily on eBay. They are inferior in quality, worthless in collectable value, a total waste of money, and should be avoided at all costs.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Milking His Legacy Dry, November 12, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Anthology 2 (Audio CD)
For some reason, I missed An Anthology, Vol. 2 when it was first issued. I wasn't even aware that it existed until it popped up in my recommendations one day after I reviewed some other 1960s blues-rock. I liked Vol. 1 well enough in its day, so I decided to take the plunge and order this. Well, like another reviewer opined, I should have stuck with An Anthology, Vol. 1 and the Allman Brothers Live at the Fillmore East album if I wanted to hear Duane Allman at his best. That's not to say there is nothing memorable, but the best on Vol. 2 would easily fill no more than an EP.
On Disc one, my favorites are Otis Rush's You Reap What You Sow, Ronnie Hawkins' rollicking Matchbox and Herbie Mann's classic Push Push, though that last is woefully short on Duane Allman. On Disc two, I like Sam Samudio's blues shuffle Goin' Upstairs, and three Allman Brothers cuts: Dimples, Done Somebody Wrong, and Leave My Blues At Home.
Among the others there are a few humorous cuts like Happily Married Man and the pimpmobile song No Money Down which are nevertheless musically lacking. To me, it is clear that the record company has milked Duane Allman's legacy dry in an understandable attempt to capitalize on the success of the first volume. There are far too many second rate jivey songs and a few covers like Wilson Pickett's Born to Be Wild and The Duck and the Bear's cover of Goin' Up the Country that are just execrable.
This edition of the CD comes housed in one of those clunky triple-wide CD cases commonly used on double CDs twenty years ago and a thin booklet that features information about who played what on which song. I won't be listening to this nearly as much as I will listen to other Duane Allman recordings. It just doesn't measure up. But if you just have to own it, I strongly suggest waiting until it has been remastered, repackaged, and hopefully graced with bonus tracks.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One for the Ages, August 26, 2008
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This review is from: Anthology 2 (Audio CD)
The Duane Allman Anthology Volume 2 brings together an eclectic mix of musicians and Allman's superior guitar skills. The range of music on this two-disc set displays Allman's versatility. Blues, Motown, southern rock, straight rock 'n roll, funky jazz, Creole rock - all manner of R&B - you find it all here.

In addition to his work with the Allmans Brothers Band, Allman was a session musician. Most of the songs here feature someone other than Allman such as King Curtis, Aretha Franklin, Herbie Mann, Otis Rush, Dr. John Creaux, Wilson Pickett, Lulu, Boz Scaggs, Delaney & Bonnie, and Ronnie Hawkins.

(Pickett's 'Born to be Wild' was one of the anthems of a generation - looking back from middle-aged parenthood I can only imagine how thrilled my parents were to hear that song blaring!)

The album goes from one triumph to another. 'Walk on Gilded Splinters' featuring Dr. John is worth the purchase price all by itself. Likewise, 'The Weight' by King Curtis and 'Push Push' by Herbie Mann.

There's also plenty to satisfy Allman Brothers Band aficionados. 'Done Somebody Wrong' and 'Midnight Rider' (live from the Fillmore East) as well as 'Leave My Blues at Home' all feature the full band.

Allman's carefree nature is on display in 'The Happily Married Man' (refrain: I ain't seen my wife in 2 or 3 years, I'm a happily married man) and 'No Money Down', a Chuck Berry song about trading in his 'broke-down raggedy Ford' for a Cadillac with a nuclear reactor, railroad air horn, and psychedelic strobe spot.

Blistering good music. Highest recommendation.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ESSENTIAL COMPANION TO VOL. 1, BUT NOT EQUAL TO IT.., August 23, 2006
By 
ol' nuff n' den sum (the Virginia coast, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Anthology 2 (Audio CD)
This volume doesn't reach the heights that the first one does, but it includes some very strong selections. Actually, I'm surprised that both volumes didn't have more songs from the historic "Layla" sessions. Gregg Allman once said that it was Duane's favorite recording session. "Born to be Wild" doesn't feature any significant guitar (Wilson Pickett shines here) and could have been left off in favor of one of the blistering lead guitar duels between Duane and Eric Clapton. The two songs from Duane's own aborted solo album sound great, and are a lot of fun. This volume digs deeper into the session work and, of course, there is plenty of outstanding acoustic and electric slide guitar on this volume as well, served up the way only Duane could do it.
Definitely Recommended as a companion to Volume 1.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Allman working his magic, April 14, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Anthology 2 (Audio CD)
This CD has got some cool tracks. It's got some more of his solo work w/ Berry & Jamoie. It has a spectacular instrumental version of The Weight w/ King Curtis. Duane's slide work on this track will confirm is masterful touch. To end the CD is a rare live version of Midnight Rider from the Fillmore '71 shows.The interplay between Dickey and Duane is magical. There are too many highlights on this CD to mention here.If you are a Duane fan this CD is an essential.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Of course it's a 5!, November 1, 2003
This review is from: Anthology 2 (Audio CD)
There will always be songs on here you like less than the others, or less than on =An Anthology= [vol. I], but this cannot =not= be a 5. C'mon, man! You have Duane singing "Dimples" live with the Brothers in 1970.04 (also on =Ludlow Garage=); what a tight performance, and such aggressive guitars. This is one of Duane's smokingest short solos (not even two minutes) ever--it just cuts and pushes until hits a searing, one-of-a-kind peak. Duane doesn't just let it all hang out--his soul is blasting forth out of him.
Plus, you gotta love the history splayed out here (though not in chronological order). For example, you have Duane singing on a couple lighthearted cuts from his 1969.02 sessions with Berry Oakley at Muscle Shoals, a month before the Allman Brothers Band was born. I say "lighthearted," but at one point in "Happily Married Man," Duane seems to about to choke on what perhaps is the true tragedy of the situation, before getting the wind back in his sails, so to speak--or carefree bluster, rather--and rollicking out. It must be admitted, though, that this one never got its guitar solo overdubbed in the middle!
This album shows well the wide range of Duane's talents as a session man, from the Delta blues of "Come On in My Kitchen" with Delaney and Bonnie to the funky soul jazz of "Push Push" with Herbie Mann--and a ton of R&B in between. I'm not convinced that all that guitar on Otis Rush's "You Reap What You Sow" isn't Otis, though--I've found the Otis tape, and all the soloing is Otis (97% sure).
Would this be the number one Duane album--to take to Mt. Desert Island, Maine, or to give to an Allman Brothers neophyte, or to give instead of chocolates next Valentine's Day--before =At Fillmore East= or, say, =An Anthology=? Or =Layla=?! Probably not, but you gotta have it, and so do they.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars better than the first, October 28, 2005
This review is from: Anthology 2 (Audio CD)
Even now listening to the two anthologies, it's hard to believe the second is stronger than the first. The session work digs deeper into obscurity, and finds more unique cuts and the ABB material is less obvious.

The set opens with one of two self penned DA songs that I am aware of (Little Martha being the other). Obviously an incomplete track waiting for Brother Duane to come back and cut the guitar solo, it is outrageously funny with a solid kick musically. Again, session work with King Curtis and the Queen of Soul are included as well as a romp with Ronnie Hawkins through matchbox. The call and resonse between DA's guitar and King Biscuit Boy on harp (not to mention the incomparable Eddie Hinton on guitar) is a thing of beauty.

Other highlights include excellent slide on Dr. John's Walk on Gilded Splinters and Come on Into My Kitchen with Delaney and Bonnie, and a stretch into Jazz on Herbie Mann's Push Push, Also included is a really sweet Hourglass outtake, Been Gone Too Long that shows that Gregg was a great soul singer as a teenager and Duane knew just where to put the fill. The ABB songs are led by a version of Dimples from Ludlow Garage. (This was the first time many of us realized there was the possibility of significant archival material of high quaility)

Essential listening for the best of the best of the guitar players
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Anthology 2
Anthology 2 by Duane Allman (Audio CD - 1990)
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