Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$12.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Remainder mark on top edge. Moderate cover wear. Interior, like brand new. Crisp pages with no notations, highlights, marks, or tears. Clean cover. Tight binding. Hand inspected. Comes in a protective poly bag. Eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy. Satisfaction guaranteed! Tracking number provided in your Amazon account.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Anthology of Rap Hardcover – November 9, 2010

4.1 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$44.78 $3.10
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$14.99

The Secret Healer
In the fourteenth century, opportunities for women are limited. But spirited young Madlen can't resist her gift for healing, even if it puts her life in danger. Learn More

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

English professors Bradley and DuBois make history in this rock-solid collection of hundreds of thoughtfully selected lyrics of recorded rap music produced between the late 1970s and now. For fans, this is an obvious treasure. For skeptical listeners and readers, this mega-anthology strips away rap’s performance elements and allows the language itself to pulse, break, spin, and strut in poems of audacity, outrage, insight, sweetness, and nastiness. Here is meter and rhyme, distillation, metaphor, misdirection, leaps of imagination, appropriation, improvisation, and a “vivid vocabulary” that can be explicit, offensive, funny, dumb, and transcendent. In their thorough and energetic introduction, Bradley and DuBois offer a concise history of rap and a keen discussion of its aesthetics, with an emphasis on written lyrics. Proceeding chronologically, from “The Old School,” 1978–84, to “The Golden Age,” 1985–92; “Rap Goes Mainstream,” 1993–99; and “New Millennium Rap,” they analyze each movement and profile each artist or group, from Kurtis Blow to Grandmaster Flash, Sugarhill Gang, LL Cool J, Public Enemy, NWA, Queen Latifah, Common, Lil’ Kim, Outkast, 2Pac, the Wu-Tang Clan, Eve, and legions more. Electrifying. --Donna Seaman

Review

“An essential contribution to our living literary tradition. . . . This groundbreaking anthology masterfully assembles part of a new vanguard of American poetry.”—from the Foreword by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
(Henry Louis Gates, Jr.)

"What you hold in your hands is more than a book. This is a culture. This is hip-hop. . . . This book offers a view of rap in full, from the root to the fruit."—from the Afterword by Common
(Common)

"This landmark work chronicles an earth-shattering movement with deep roots."—The New York Times Book Review
(The New York Times Book Review)

"A complete encyclopedia of the history, personalities, beats, rhythm and rhymes of the musical genre from the old school of Grand Master Flash & The Furious Five to hip-hop and Kanye West."—Los Angeles Times
(Los Angeles Times)

"The Anthology of Rap is among the best books of its kind ever published."—Dan Chiasson, The New York Review of Books
(Dan Chiasson The New York Review of Books)

"What could have been an insufferable rap-snob collectible ended up being one of the first truly encyclopedic, essential anthologies on the form. . . . It's an Ivy League master class in the language of hip-hop. Register today."—Foster Kamer, The Village Voice (Best Books of 2010)

(Foster Kamer The Village Voice)

"An awesome compilation: 920 pages of some of the baddest, phattest, flyist tracks ever dropped."—Mother Jones (Mother Jones)

"Every great literature deserves a great anthology. Rap finally has its own."—from the Afterword by Chuck D
(Chuck D)

“From the Sing Song cadence of the slave preachers to the emotional bravery of Tupac Shakur to the clarity of Queen Latifah…for all the hearts and heads and voices who have still to be heard: We Now Have an Encyclopedia. Good for us. Much needed. Much needed.”—Nikki Giovanni
(Nikki Giovanni)

"The Anthology of Rap is an instant classic. It brings together the lyric poetry of some of the greatest artists of our time. Hip Hop is here to stay and rap lives forever—on the stage and now on the page!"—Cornel West

(Cornel West)

"These Rappers' lyrics love. Cut. Curse. Fight. Teach. Play. Pray. Testify. They bring us the pace of sound. The swiftness of sound. The discordant way of looking at the world of sound. The Blackness of sound. The new bebopic beat of sound. These are word sorcerers who love language and hablar sin bastón (speak without a crutch)."—Sonia Sanchez
(Sonia Sanchez)

"This monumental encyclopedia of rhymes is great for hip-hop newbies or longtime fans, lyric lovers and poetry devotees. It's an invaluable reference on hip-hop history spanning from Afrika Bambaataa to Kanye West."—Touré
(Touré)

“Some readers of poetry still wonder where the rhymes went. One answer is they left the ends of the lines and went inside the poem. But rhyme also strongly re-emerges in rap. Whatever the stakes or the messages contained in this monumental volume, the like-sounds that used to be the engine of English poetry drive and power these energetic lyrics.”—Billy Collins
(Billy Collins)

"As ambitious and intelligent as anyone might want, and more enjoyable than anyone might think. . . . If you want to hear how the latter part of the twentieth century sounded, you can't do better than this book."—Kevin Young, Bookforum
(Kevin Young Bookforum)

"Listen along on YouTube and it's a self-taught class on the genre's history."—New York Magazine
(New York Magazine)

"An English major's hip-hop bible, an impossible fusion of street cred and book learning. . . . Reading [it] was the most fun I've had with a book in many months."—Sam Anderson, New York Magazine
(Sam Anderson New York Magazine)

"The Anthology of Rap reaffirms the enduring force of the written word—or at least the immaculately constructed freestyle."—LA Weekly
(LA Weekly)

"The eye-opening essay by [Henry Louis] Gates. . . provides deep historical context for rap; it alone makes the book worth owning."—Slate (Slate)

"A great, necessary addition to the book collection of any contemporary music aficionado."—Creative Loafing (Creative Loafing)

"Reading The Anthology of Rap, which covers everything from Afrika Bambaataa to Young Jeezy, it's hard not to appreciate rap's astounding love of words, of the way they fit together and play off each other, and of how meaning can be layered upon meaning to get at a deeper truth. Which sounds an awful lot like poetry."—Joshua Ostroff, The Globe and Mail
(Joshua Ostroff The Globe and Mail)

"[The Anthology of Rap] makes the case for the immediate and enduring relevance of [rap's] poetic tradition."—Barnes and Noble Review
(Barnes and Noble Review)

"[The] editors of The Anthology of Rap supply a much needed injection of energy and enthusiasm into our analysis of hip-hop's lyricism."—Quentin B. Huff, PopMatters
(Quentin B. Huff PopMatters)

"[The] anthology offers the good, the bad, and the offensive--and plenty of food for intelligent discussion."—Minneapolis Star Tribune
(Minneapolis Star Tribune)

"This thrilling (but controversial) textual monument to a thrilling (but controversial) oral tradition wrestles the genre's greatest lyricists out of the airwaves and into cold print. . . . [It] enables something wonderful: the ability to sit in perfect silence and roll around in, for example, the lust Keatsian soundplay of Jay-Z."—Sam Anderson, New York Magazine, "The Year in Books"
(Sam Anderson New York Magazine 2010-12-05)

"The authors have built a poignant collection of rhythm and rhyme. . . . For hard-core hip-hop heads, this book confirms what we have always known: that some of the most innovative writing hails from the imagination of the rapper."—Idris Goodwin, The Boston Globe (Idris Goodwin The Boston Globe)

"An exquisite display of the artistic talent seen with rap music."—Boston Music Spotlight
(Boston Music Spotlight)

"Intelligent and authentic. . . written for both the hip-hop head and the uninitiated."—James Johnson, Philadelphia Inquirer (James Johnson Philadelphia Inquirer)

Honorable mention in the Compilations/Anthologies category of the 2010 New England Book Festival, given by the JM Northern Media family of festivals
(New England Book Festival Compilation/Anthologies Category New England Book Festival 2011-01-04)

"The editors have been bold and often brilliant. . . . The Anthology of Rap is as ambitious and intelligent as anyone might want, and more enjoyable than anyone might think. . . . If you want to hear how the latter part of the twentieth century sounded, you can't do better than this book."—Kevin Young, Bookforum
(Kevin Young Bookforum)
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Interested in the Audiobook Edition?
If you’re the author, publisher, or rights holder of this book, let ACX help you produce the audiobook.Learn more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 920 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (November 9, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300141904
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300141900
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #279,299 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Related Media

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I applaud the work of Bradley and DuBois in bringing this anthology to life - it was needed! I'm fascinated by its polarizing nature - people absolutely love it or hate it.

Most of the criticism is focused on accuracy of transcriptions, which the editors address in the anthology. The text is not perfect, nor should we expect it to be if we recognize the breadth of this work. This should not be seen as a final statement of fact, but an evolving window into an under-appreciated culture.

When you move beyond the letter and fully grasp the spirit of the anthology, you see an accessible toolkit for understanding rap. Importantly, it pays homage to many rappers that have faded from consciousness. Indeed, I would say that some of the rappers whose lyrics have been debated over accuracy have benefited greatly. At its core, this anthology is homage. Similarly, those artists that have not been included have been the focus of renewed interest.

I'm grateful for this collection - it's been a wonderful trip down memory lane, giddily recalling when I first heard many of the records.

And for those that didn't grow up with this poetry, I'm happy to see the interest in rap the anthology is generating.
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I'm shocked at how many people have ganged up against this book, far beyond any realistic or even rational criticism. I'm guessing the book review in Slate magazine started a particularly nasty argument in the Fray which has since spilled over onto Amazon. I can only guess a large enough portion of people who read that review and participated in that flame war didn't let off enough steam, so they came over to Amazon to do a "hatchet job" on the book's rating.

Nearly all of the criticisms levelled at this book are accusing it of being "rife with errors". Allow me to put things in a bit more realistic of a perspective: There are 26 well-documented errors out of almost a thousand entries. I don't know about you, but my definition of "rife with errors" requires a little more than that.

But I digress. Let's talk about the book.

Bradley and DuBois have gone to great lengths to frame rap itself in a literary and historical context within American culture. Through hundreds of examples, they have managed to effectively create a chronological history of the evolution of rap as a lyrical medium since the very first rappers started rhyming over disco beats.

It's telling that all of the negative reviews of this book come down to nitpicking over transcription of lyrics. I can only take this as proof that hip hop culture has aged enough to where people can become so emotionally involved over the slightest variation in words. I would argue that this makes the case that much stronger for a need to give rap the thorough historical documentation and academic study it deserves. In that way, I doubt you'll find anywhere a more thorough and insightful book on rap lyrics that this.
Comment 35 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By trotsky on December 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover
RAP is not just for specialists, for the quickdraw pedants of pop culture who are every bit as self-seeking and in the end corrupt as their academic counterparts. RAP is for the mass of Americans trapped in the profound inanities of conventional thinking, middle-class cowardice, and fake feeling brought about by the conditioning of too much liberal or conservative slobber. This book isn't about mistakes of transcription, as minimal as they really are. It's about an art dedicated to breaking barriers of language and thinking. And this book delivers what it should deliver: the goods of a true American art form in a way that all Americans can take in and come to comprehend. Buy this book, read it deeply, break out of your own shell of expectations and limited knowledge. Confront yourself and your cherished ideas about the things you think are sacred. Do it. Let RAP help you. Then ask yourself if the pecksniff critics of exactitude have any real place in the discussion of what is important either in art or life.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I purchased this book to prep for a Rap as Poetry course at Wayne State. It's invaluable, and lets folks trace various hooks and lines throughout rap's short and lively history. Indispensable.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
It's been said before that the lyrics came directly from ohhla.com and this was something I didnt notice, as I havent analyzed most of the lyrics while listening to the music. However, I did notice that there was no mention of many noteworthy artists such as Killah Priest, Hell Razah, or anyone from the DuckDown label. These artists have withstood the test of time and still release new and more importantly, good material. All of these MCs I felt deserved a spot above artists who were included such as MIA and Drake. Their bodies of work are much deeper than club hits released in the past 3 years. Having said that, I was pleasantly surprised to find Jay Electronica in the "lyrics for further study" chapter as he is far underrated and still practically unknown. I like the idea of the book, but like its already been said, there need to be revisions. Peace!
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
1st off, all of you dissing this book should probably read the book first. reading a Slate review without reading the book is a terrible way to judge it and then to post negative things about it. Try reading what Chuck D has to say about it or the New York TImes or LA Times.

as a longtime lover and historian of rap, i found this to be the best book ever written on the subject. they were able to elevate rap to a serious academic artform with the publication of this book. Most of the rappers support this work and claim it is spot on. The Slate editor just seems a little jealous. I'm gonna trust the New York Times book review and Chuck D. over some nobody writing in Slate.

I read this book and think its awesome.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews