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So You Think You Know Antietam?, The Stories Behind America's Bloodiest Day Paperback – August 17, 2012


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So You Think You Know Antietam?, The Stories Behind America's Bloodiest Day + So You Think You Know Gettysburg? The Stories behind the Monuments and the Men Who Fought One of America's Most Epic Battles + So You Think You Know Gettysburg? Volume Two
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: John F. Blair, Publisher (August 17, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0895875799
  • ISBN-13: 978-0895875792
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 8 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #753,157 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

James and Suzanne Gindlesperger are the authors of So You Think You Know Gettysburg?, which was the bronze winner for ForeWord Reviews' Book of the Year Award in 2010. James is a "Friend of the Field" at Gettysburg and the author of three books about the Civil War: Escape from Libby Prison, Seed Corn of the Confederacy, and Fire on the Water. Suzanne is the cofounder of Pennwriters, a professional organization of published and aspiring authors. The couple lives in Johnstown, Pennsylvania.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert Redd VINE VOICE on November 4, 2012
Format: Paperback
Coming off the success of their prior book with a similar name except dealing with Gettysburg (see my review here on Amazon) it was only natural for husband and wife authors James and Suzanne Gindlesperger to create another highly readable and visually appealing book dealing with another great Civil War battle.

This time around they have chosen to tackle Antietam. On that September day in 1862 approximately 23,000 men were casualties with over 3,500 paying the ultimate price. Now the well preserved battlefield stands as a monument to these men no matter which side they were fighting for or what their reason for fighting was.

Part history, part travel log, part pictorial reference this is a book that should be on the library shelves of anybody interested in the battle of Antietam or any student of Civil War memory. While not a good introduction to the battle itself this is a great book for anybody travelling the main park service roads.

While this book can certainly be read on it's own (that's what I did) it's value would be on the battlefield and for those interested in the dozens of monuments that commemorate various people, places, brigades, and more.

The book is broken into ten chapters each covering a section of the battlefield. Each chapter begins with a brief outline and includes a Mapquest map helping travellers keep their bearings. For each battlefield marker included there is a photo as well as GPS coordinates. Modern photos are sometimes supplemented by historical photos and artwork. The text accompanying each stop on the tour describes the significance of the subject and often times points out information about the physical monument including dedication dates and artist information. The four appendices cover Robert E.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By victor vignola on June 30, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Short and sweet descriptions about the monuments on the field is most useful. Each monument is accompanied by a picture and a brief summary of when it was dedicated and also a brief account as to what the monument portrays.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By civilwarlibrarian on September 16, 2012
Format: Paperback
So You Think You Know Antietam? The Stories Behind America's Bloodiest Day offers descriptions and photographs of 129 monuments and sites on the Antietam/Sharpsburg battlefield. GPS coordinates are given for every site. Much of the photography is in color with several black and white wartime images, including portraits of officers. Included are the Lincoln-McClellan Meeting site, the farms, special topographic features such as the Rock Ledge in the West Woods, the Antietam train station, Lee's headquarters, Sharpsburg's Slave Block, and the National Cemetery. War Department markers, wayside markers, artillery pieces, hospitals, fences, and reenactors are briefly described in the final chapter. The appendices includes the full text of Lee's Special Orders 191, the Federal and Confederate Orders of Battle, and the U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor winners.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rea Andrew Redd on October 31, 2012
Format: Paperback
So You Think You Know Antietam? The Stories Behind America's Bloodiest Day offers descriptions and photographs of 129 monuments and sites on the Antietam/Sharpsburg battlefield. GPS coordinates are given for every site. Much of the photography is in color with several black and white wartime images, including portraits of officers. Included are the Lincoln-McClellan Meeting site, the farms, special topographic features such as the Rock Ledge in the West Woods, the Antietam train station, Lee's headquarters, Sharpsburg's Slave Block, and the National Cemetery. War Department markers, wayside markers, artillery pieces, hospitals, fences, and reenactors are briefly described in the final chapter. The appendices includes the full text of Lee's Special Orders 191, the Federal and Confederate Orders of Battle, and the U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor winners. Comment | Permalink
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. P. Anderson on January 3, 2013
Format: Paperback
As a kid, I grew up very near the Antietam battlefield. I traipsed all over it, and read as much as I could about the battle, both then and as an adult.

How exciting to come across a book that would possibly tell me some things that I didn't already know. How disappointing it was, however, to find out this is really just a guidebook to the battlefield - and mostly just to the monuments at that.

Further, the description of the monuments are a tad on the boring side. They usually describe the action the regiment engaged in during the battle (and most monuments are at the regimental level), then a little something about who the monument was made by and when it was dedicated. It just reminded me of a really long list, with particular items the authors needed to check off.

Oh, almost forgot ... The maps are atrocious.

That said, it's definitely not that bad as a guidebook. I would definitely not recommend reading it on its own, however - unless you're a real die-hard Antietam fanatic.
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