Anton Chekhov's The Duel 2010 NR

Amazon Instant Video

(11) IMDb 6.3/10
Available in HD

In ANTON CHEKHOV'S THE DUEL, escalating animosity between two men with opposing philosophies of life is played out against the backdrop of a decaying seaside resort along the Black Sea coast. Laevsky is a dissipated romantic given to gambling and flirtation. He has run off to the sea with beautiful, emotionally empty, Nadya, another man's wife. Laevsky has now grown tired of her, but two obstacles block his route to escape: he is broke, and he faces the absolute enmity of Von Koren, an arrogant zoologist and former friend who can no longer tolerate Laevsky's irresponsibility. Soon Laevsky confronts Von Koren, accusing him of meddling in his affairs, but Von Koren maneuvers a criticism Laevsky makes of their mutual friend, Dr. Samoylenko, into a challenge to a duel. Utterly discombobulated and honor bound, Laevsky agrees to this absurdity -- a duel it shall be! A duel as comically inadvertent as it is inevitable.

Starring:
Andrew Scott, Fiona Glascott
Runtime:
1 hour 35 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Anton Chekhov's The Duel

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Dover Koshashvili
Starring Andrew Scott, Fiona Glascott
Supporting actors Tobias Menzies, Niall Buggy, Nicholas Rowe, Michelle Fairley, Simon Trinder, Debbie Chazen, Graham Turner, Jeremy Swift, Alister Cameron, Mislav Cavajda, Franka Gulin, Neven Jercel, Rik Makarem, Tea Matanovic, Juliana Overmeer, Ilya Sarossy, Goran Kostic
Studio Music Box Films
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

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See all 11 customer reviews
It was a real treat.
Natashainmelbourne
"Anton Chekhov's The Duel" is an excellent well acted film with fabulous scenery and period dress.
James C. Lindsay
This is supposed to be one of Chekhov's better short stories.
Michael

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Russell Fanelli VINE VOICE on January 27, 2012
Format: DVD
Sadly for me, The Duel is a film which looks good on the screen, but unfortunately is a badly directed adaptation of Anton Chekov's fine novella of the same name. The director, Dover Koshashvili, portrays Laevsky, the central character in the novella, as a nasty, brutish lout whose bizarre behavior is as unaccountable to the other characters in the film as it is to the viewer. He has left St. Petersburg for a small town on the Black Sea with another man's wife. He discovers that he does not love this woman, Nadya, and wants to leave her and return to St. Petersburg. He tries to borrow money from a local doctor, who in turn asks a zoologist, Van Koren, for the rubles. Van Koren hates Laevsky and tries to persuade the doctor to convince Laevsky to take Nadya with him when he leaves. When Laevsky comes to ask for the money, he insults the doctor and Van Koren uses this provocation to challenge Laevsky to fight a duel. Those that wish to see this film can discover the outcome of the duel for themselves.

As noted, director Koshashvili's mishandling and misunderstanding of the main character make it difficult for the viewer to make much sense of the story. All the other characters in the film have the same problem as the viewer; they watch Laevsky's antics with some astonishment, not knowing what to make of his behavior, and yet they tolerate him. Almost as confusing and equally unsatisfying is the treatment of Nadya, the woman who has left her husband for Laevsky. The director has little understanding of what motivates her as she interacts with Laevsky and the other characters in the film. In Chekov's novella, Nadya plays a small, but important role. In Koshasvili's film she is a central character and has many scenes unnecessary to the development of the story.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Professor Goatboy on December 31, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
"The Duel" is one of the most complex and interesting short stories in Western literature: it takes on class, ethnicity, sexuality, Darwinism, Christianity, and subtle interpersonal topics like "generosity" and "self-interest" in the quietest and most subtle way. I read the story every year: second- best is seeing this film, which gets everything right and even adds just the right visuals to make its point. The acting, direction, and costumes are impeccable -- you will think yourself in late 19th-century Russia for days afterward. My only reservation is with the last 3 minutes, which obscure Chekhov's conclusions. See it now.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By New Yorker on September 22, 2013
Format: DVD
Great acting and direction, wonderful script, beautiful cinematography.
It's basically about two men, one of whom you admire and the other of whom
you dislike intensely. But could they change positions over time? There's
a lot of action, despite the source material; "Chekhov" so often signifies
something like "Nothing happens," but not here. And despite the English accents,
the film has a Russian feeling, perhaps because the director is from Georgia
(the Eastern European one, not the American). And Fiona Glascott has to be one
of the most beautiful women I've ever seen in a movie. A very rich experience.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A. Anderson on May 25, 2012
Format: DVD
Any adaptation from a much-loved work of literature is bound to disappoint, or puzzle, on certain levels. Some succeed and some fail miserably. This "interpretation" of Chekhov's novella is faithful, esthetic, respectful - perhaps almost too respectful to work as a film on its own, if the viewer has no prior knowledge of Chekhov's often strange and certainly vanished world. I do think this is a successful interpretation of Chekhov's intent, however; it is well-written, well-acted, and immaculately produced, with gorgeous scenery and music, and it renders well the atmosphere of the original. Not a film for anyone expecting "action" from the duel of the title, but certainly rewarding for those who are still looking for a visual poetry from the cinema, or a questioning of the human heart.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Natashainmelbourne on June 12, 2012
Format: DVD
It is a wonderful interpretation of the famous Chekhov's novel with a new approach and deep examination of the novel's main characters. The direction of the film and the photography are second to none. Considering none of the actors were of Russian background their ability to study and recreate that "Russian" soul is really commendable. It felt authentic Russian through and through. It was a real treat. My mother-in-law, an old English lady fell in love with the film. I felt so proud! Definitely recommend buying it and keep on your library shelf for returning back to it again and again and then passing on to your kids. It is worth it.
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Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Chekhov's marvelous novella, "The Duel," is a compelling story about the foibles
of men and women who love too much or not enough. The only generous character,
the doctor, tries to offer help to the despairing and anxiety-ridden anti-hero, but the latter's
self-absorption is so intense that not even a doctor can keep the lover from entrapping
himself at every turn. The duel in the end is the epitome of arrogance, the natural
outcome of a life of decadence, and a clever symbol of the lover's inability to free
himself from the duel with his own demons.
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