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Anywhere: How Global Connectivity is Revolutionizing the Way We Do Business Hardcover – January 4, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (January 4, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071635149
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071635141
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,697,735 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Emily Nagle Green is president and CEO of Yankee Group, a leading firm in researching global connectivity change. Yankee Group supports businesses worldwide that use, operate, or help build networks with powerful ideas, forecasts, conferences, and strategy consulting. Green is also vice-chair of MITX, the largest association for digital marketing and media technology in the United States. She lives in Boston, Massachusetts.

More About the Author

Emily Nagle Green is president and chief executive officer of Yankee Group, a global technology research company.

Throughout her varied career as a technology engineer, marketer and researcher, and through her published work and speaking engagements, Emily has become a widely respected thought leader on the impact of connectivity on networks, enterprises and consumers.

Emily earned a B.S.L. cum laude in linguistics from Georgetown University and an M.S.E. in artificial intelligence and computer graphics from University of Pennsylvania's Moore School of Engineering.

She currently serves as vice-chair of Massachusetts Innovation & Technology Exchange (MITX), the U.S.'s largest Internet advocacy council.

Customer Reviews

If you want to be prepared for the new world of working without walls, "Anywhere" will do the job.
Rod Collins
I recommend Anywhere to anyone who wants a summary of where the digital revolution is currently, where it's going, and how you can profit from it.
Keith E. Webb
In Anywhere, Emily Nagle Green builds a compelling case for how quickly the change will occur and the challenges and opportunities it presents.
James L. Freeze

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Keith E. Webb VINE VOICE on January 29, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Anywhere describes a revolution in global connectivity that enables all people and the things they care about to be connected at all times. Written by the President of a four-decade-old technology research and consulting firm, Anywhere, gives a compelling look at the current and future state of connectivity and what it means for you as a consumer and how to make profit from it as an enterprise.

What's the Anywhere Revolution? The author summarizes it like this:
1. A transformation taking place due to common digital network, increased broadband capacity, and wireless economics. (Think: iTunes and WiFi)
2. Which is producing huge shifts in power, behavior, and money all over the world. (Think: call centers in India)
3. This gives rise to new forms of goods and services that depend on connectivity. (Think: what you can do with your iPhone)
4. The rate of connectivity isn't equally advancing around the globe. (Think: China vs Africa)

As a result, there is tremendous opportunity for those who get connected and operate in connected ways.

Anywhere means: Our customers are anywhere, ordering from a smartphone as well as a PC. Our workers are anywhere, IBM saves $110m because a third of their staff work from home. Our products are available anywhere, replacing physical with digital or using digital to track physical.

For those who are regular readers of Fast Company or Wired Magazine you won't be surprised by what you read in Anywhere. As a coach and trainer I was challenged by how the new realities of Anywhere could apply to my work. I'm a big thinker, but Anywhere helped me think even bigger - to an Anywhere audience, in Anywhere ways.

I recommend Anywhere to anyone who wants a summary of where the digital revolution is currently, where it's going, and how you can profit from it.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By M. L Lamendola VINE VOICE on April 13, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This book hits the pluses and provides an optimistic view of emerging connectivity, but it's weak on addressing the downsides and reality of it. So, I'll begin by pointing out a few things this book overlooks. Then I'll sum up what it addresses.

What the author doesn't tell you
First, there's the productivity cost. It's huge. I used to carry a cell phone everywhere. Now, I don't use one. In fact, I rarely answer my regular telephone. Sometimes, I unplug it for hours at a time.

I don't like being interrupted, especially when I'm trying to do something productive. A business that inflicts constant connectivity on its employees has a highly distracted workforce. Ms. Green makes it sound as though the Twitter-averse among us are like the e-mail-averse of times past. But this is an apples to oranges comparison.

Second, there's the attention cost. E-mail is asynchronous. Texting and tweeting are "immediate response" activities. Can anyone who's chained to a frequently-interrupting device really pay attention to any worthwhile activity? Any technology that interrupts you simply because it can is just too costly, unless you aren't the kind of person who does anything that matters.

Third, there's the subscription cost. If you have a mobile data plan, ask yourself what you are really getting for all that money. If it's just interruptions and the ability to send/receive throwaway photos, then it might not be all that good. For a business, a mobile data plan may be essential. But how many people are paying $99 a month or more for something that they probably would not miss if they stopped using it? If you have one of these plans, is it making your life better or is it an addiction?

A fourth problem is the devices are insanely small.
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tony Deblauwe on June 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Imagine a pill bottle that can track when medicine has been taken, or a vending machine that automatically sends a message to corporate only when it needs replenishing. These are just some examples that exist today in the evolving global technology world that connects us. Anywhere provides a glimpse into the near future where people and technology converge on a scale we've not seen before.

In fact, Nagle refers to it more as a revolution. Based on her years of research on several technologies including broadband and internet as CEO of the Yankee Group, she is an authority on the changing connectivity landscape and what it means to individuals and businesses. In fact, Nagle estimates the "Anywhere Network Economy" will generate $1 trillion in global revenues by 2012. This is the heart of what Nagle refers to as "ubiquitous connectivity" that connects us and the things we care about.

Nagle separates these changes into the key components of a common digital network, broadband demand, and wireless ubiquity. Each of these areas represent key puzzle pieces that allow the sharing of intelligent content instantly and rapid response as the norm. Her analysis and examples of how the process is already changing every facet of our lives is amazing. Every second breakthroughs propel people and systems forward in the evolving digital era. If you're looking for a unique overview of how the technology you use today will impact you're your everyday life, Always is a must read.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Hardt on January 30, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Anywhere examines recent technological trends: cloud computing and the flat world and its long tail and wikis and wireless and atoms and bits. Then Anywhere ties them together into a vision of what life will look like when all people and devices are inevitably connected, all the time.

The useful bit is that Anywhere goes beyond describing current trends and predicting the future. It offers concrete metrics to quantify how prepared I and my company are for this world. Thought exercises and quizzes helped me identify the specifics of what an Anywhere world means to our business.

"It's got Cosmo quizzes?!" scoffed my cynical colleague. Well, yes, sort of. But even if the quiz results aren't hard science, I still find it helpful to think about where my plans lie on a spectrum of possibilities.

I found this book observant and eye-opening, forward-looking and maybe a little frightening. It shows that universal connectivity and immediate, unfettered data are coming, and in some surprising ways are already here. Ultimately it left me excited to be navigating this moment in history and confident I can manage what lies ahead.

I'll buy another copy to circulate among the leadership team in our Engineering group. I'm hanging onto mine.
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