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Apocalypse Wow (Signed) Hardcover – Bargain Price, April 24, 1997


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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

With the millennium fast approaching and Armageddon just around the corner, one fundamental question lingers: how will it all come down? In search of an answer, James Finn Garner conducted an exhaustive and hilarious examination of nearly every source readily available for predicting the future, including boiled tea leaves, crystal balls, and severed donkey heads. With plenty of wit and tongue planted firmly in cheek, Garner seeks to uncover the universal truths behind crop circles, harmonic convergence, and channeling. Continuing the irreverent style he established with his bestselling Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, he has fun with conspiracy theorists and shysters alike, providing a fun read for those not busy stockpiling provisions. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

As the year 2000 bears down, the best-selling author of Politically Correct Bedtime Stories, James Finn Garner, confronts a series of monumental questions: Will we remember to order new checks from the bank? Did our invitation to the Kennedy New Year's party get lost in the mail again? Are we all poised on the brink of worldwide enlightenment or complete planetary destruction? Should you really bother investing in that Five-Year CD?

"Tonight," in the unforgettable words of The Artist Formerly Known as Prince, "We're gonna party like it's 1999." The end is near...or at least nearer than it used to be, says Garner. Humanity is wracked by millennial panic and apocalyptic anticipation -- or if it isn't already, just wait until it reads Garner's latest (and last?). In it, he sets off on a slightly-to-the-South-of-skeptical pilgrimage in search of the truth behind the end times predictions.END --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1st edition (April 24, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684836491
  • ASIN: B000H2N9ZE
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,294,639 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

James Finn Garner's best known book is "Politically Correct Bedtime Stories", which spent 64 weeks on the New York Times Best-seller list, including six weeks in the top position. The book was also a best-seller in England and Canada, and has been translated into more than 25 languages. Its sequels, "Once Upon A More Enlightened Time" and "Politically Correct Holiday Stories", were also best sellers sold around the world.

His most recent work is "Tea Party Fairy Tales", which is available exclusively as a Kindle Single from Amazon.

His 2011 novel -- the seminal Clown Noir, "Honk Honk, My Darling: A Rex Koko, Private Clown Mystery" -- was voted Book of the Year (Nontraditional Fiction) by the Chicago Writers Association. His other books include "Recut Madness: Favorite Films Retold for Your Partisan Pleasure" and "Apocalypse WOW: A Memoir for the End of Time".

A former columnist with Chicago Magazine, Garner has broadcast commentaries on National Public Radio.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Fawzi Karout on December 12, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The book's setting is Chicago, Illinois. The author is the main character and parades around Chicago to learn about the Apocalypse and the signs that hint the end. He starts the book by explaining the philosophy of other prophets such as the well known Nostradamus.He explains the different dates of Apocalypse according to Nostradamus' most famous book.
In search of an answer James Finn Garner read books written by philosophers who tried to predict the end of the world.He tries to prove the theory of several different philosophers. While attempting to prove the theories of the philosophers right he also realizes that they are also absolutely inaccurate. James Finn Garner also conducted a tiring but hilarious analysis of almost every source available for predicting the future, such as boiled tea leaves, crystal balls, and severed donkey heads. Garner looks to uncover the truths behind crop circles, harmonic convergence, and channeling. It was a humorous take on the end of the world. Ganer seems to change a disaster to what one would call a grade A comedy.While using comedy he also may offend some readers as he does insult almost every religion ranging from Christianity to Judaism. Using his politically incorrect gestures he makes a reader laugh. Garner will jump from serious to humor but certain theories maybe confusing for readers as he tends to use scientific terms which a reader would never understand.His book is a comedy but a politically incorrect comedy. The question is why does the cover clearly state a that it is a politically correct story. The book really should never be given to a religous or fanatic person. This book has clearly been written for a person who is not easily affended.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David Group on November 25, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Okay, so the millenium has passed, but there are still some who say that apocalyptic doom is just around the corner. James Finn Garner has taken all this doom and gloom and dissected it with a satirist's wit, hopefully putting all your fears to rest. Imagine the skepticism of a James Randi combined with the irreverence of a Michael Moore as he tackles everything from the Bible to UFOs. Maybe now you'll be able to sleep at night. I recommend reading this with Stephen Jay Gould's QUESTIONING THE MILLENIUM.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 23, 1998
Format: Hardcover
"Apocalypse Wow!" is probably the funniest book I have read so far this year. Garner totally debunks every apoclayptic prophecy and superstition from The Revalation to Nostradamus by sarcastically pretending to believe them. This book was an incredibly light read, I read it cover to cover at a coffee shop near my college. I think this is a vastly underrated book. I hadn't even heard of it until I noticed it on the library shelf as having a catchy title.
I would say this book is a hilarious and engaging work of common sense and skepticism in society obsessed with the "X-Files" and "Unexplained Mysteries". I found particularly funny the way he parodied the obsession with names and prophecy by rearranging names in the book (i.e. Nostradamus = Stud Oarsman, Roast Us Damn!) No supersition or archaic belief is spared here, including UFOs, reincarnation, or the lost city of Atlantis.
Perhaps the only downfall of this book was the last chapter, which was somewhat anticlimactic and didn't cover anything previous chapters already didn't. But a great book nonetheless.
I highly recommend this book to any skeptic with a sense of humor.
Chris
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brian Connors VINE VOICE on October 30, 2007
Format: Hardcover
First off, is it so hard to take this as something other than Y2K humor? Given the continued survival of people like Deepak Chopra and Pat Robertson, and the general anti-intellectual climate of American life, this book didn't lose relevance when the lights failed to go out on 1/1/2000.

Garner's humor is quite dry and snarky, and admittedly that doesn't appeal to everyone. But I think he captures the attitude of a great many skeptics towards poorly thought out spiritual, pseudoscientific, and pseudohistorical writings and themes that, despite being unprovable or outright ridiculous, still inflame the thoughts of many a true believer. Essentially, Garner's work here presents it, not as the subject for serious debate that many of these ideas' promonents want to frame it as, but illogical garbage worthy only of mockery and ridicule. This offends some? So be it. We skeptics have as much right to informed mockery of these half-baked ideas as their proponents do to put them out there.

Garner does cover a lot of ground, too -- disguised behind Garner's mostly-fictional (and often hilariously inept) adventures are strident criticisms of pyramidiocy, Atlantean obsession, ersatz Native American spirituality (of the type practiced by people referred to by humorist Robert Lanham as Cherohonkees, fluffbunny paganism, and the ominous singlemindedness of Christian fundamentalism, culminating in a three-for-the-price-of-one skewering of media-whore preachers, talk radio, and gematria such as the Bible Code.
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