Appeal To Reason

October 7, 2008 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:19
30
2
4:01
30
3
3:42
30
4
3:09
30
5
3:05
30
6
3:42
30
7
3:27
30
8
4:05
30
9
3:34
30
10
4:13
30
11
4:02
30
12
4:02
30
13
4:02
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 7, 2008
  • Release Date: October 7, 2008
  • Label: DGC/Interscope
  • Copyright: (C) 2008 DGC Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:23
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001HDYLYK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (126 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,577 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By T. Yurish on October 7, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Rise Against have nailed it yet again with their third major label album. With powerful vocals and a strong political message, Rise Against have created another masterpiece. They definitely aren't afraid to stray a little from their hardcore style and into a slower, more melodic genre, but they also aren't afraid to express their feelings, and express them well.

I give this album 4.5 stars(can't pick it, but 4 is not enough) because RA have only improved from their last release, and improvement is the greatest virtue in a band's music career. However, the only advice I'd have for the band is to not stray too far from their fast hardcore roots. Mid-tempo songs are good, but I have every confidence that RA will speed up their tempos a little on their next release. However, for now, I commend the band because they've still stayed, for the most part, true to their hardcore/punk roots, while also getting great popular reception with Appeal to Reason.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By goatdan on October 7, 2008
Format: Audio CD
I first heard about Rise Against when they opened for Bad Religion, and I was really surprised by the combination of how fun they were to listen to and watch, as well as how they had lyrics that were written to actually mean something.

With the release of Appeal to Reason, Rise Against continues this trend and refines it. The songs all have a bit of a more radio-friendly sounding edge to them, but the lyrics to the songs are all still clearly more intelligent than your normal 'radio band.' Also, unlike what normally happens with band releases so close to an election, Rise Against manages to avoid harping specifically on their feelings about the candidates and therefore end up with an album that is timeless in nature. The musicality of the group has also improved with songs having a more refined edge to them with less of the more out of control feeling of their earlier albums.

If you're looking for an album that is catchy but has a lot more meaning in it than your average pop-punk album, look no further than this album. If you like songs with meaning to be all about the lyrics and to take second place, you probably won't much care for this album. I think it is amazing though.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Rudolph Klapper on October 7, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Pop-punk has always been a fairly trivial, disrespected genre; even the combination of such wildly divergent descriptors as "pop" and "punk" was more than a little odd. On one hand of the spectrum you had bands like Good Charlotte and Simple Plan, bands that took the rapid-fire, up-tempo rhythms and power-chord angst of their predecessors and paired them with bratty, candy-coated pop song structures and high-pitched sentiments. On the other hand, you had bands that retained the melodic integrity of punk and their poppier brethren but took inspiration from the furious, challenging, and socially conscious hardcore bands of the `80s, such as Fugazi and Bad Religion. As anyone who has listened to Rise Against's previous albums, they fall much more squarely in the latter department, yet with Appeal to Reason, their 5th record, they lean even more into the poppier realm without leaving behind the politically-charged lyrics of their previous releases.

The addition of new guitarist Zach Blair has done nothing to dull their obvious musical fire; opener "Collapse (Post Amerika)" announces itself with a squall of feedback before erupting into a blistering solo and an unrelenting drumbeat as singer Tim McIlrath's vicious yet controlled roar snarls "this is not a test / this is cardiac arrest." One of the most immediately apparent improves on Appeal to Reason is McIlrath's delivery, as the talented vocalist now stays away from the tuneless screaming that often characterized their peers and continues to focus on leading the melody.

Songs like lead single "Re-Education (Through Labor)" and the astounding "The Dirt Whispered" showcase McIlrath's versatility and his ability to overcome the cacophonous storm of the instruments below him.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Nick Colosi on October 9, 2008
Format: Audio CD
As Rise Against broke the skin of the mainstream some time after the release of "Siren Songs" with the single "Swing Life Away," it appeared, at least to me, like the petty fame that this band had run into would not ultimately be their destruction like it was for basically ever underground band that makes it big. "Sufferer and the Witness," while not as in-your-face as previous releases, still carries the fist pumping anthems that keeps fans of the underground happy regardless of the major label. The sellout whistle was not yet blown, but I think now it has. "Appeal to Reason" proves what I had been trying to deny for the longest time. Fame DOES ruin every band it touches. Rise Against I thought was the exception to the rule, but all that happened was it took a two year transition period. This CD, I hate to say it, was made for the mainstream and for the radio. It's full of big choruses and power ballads. Tim, who I believe once said "We've always written pop songs and we've always written hardcore songs" has managed to write exactly no hardcore songs at all. In fact, he doesn't use his trademark scream even once until the closing track, but instead, emphasizes his capability to hold a note. Now, let me say this, Tim has one of the best voices out there, and his singing is a gem, but one thing that made him special was the ability to go back and forth from singing to screaming at the drop of a hat without taking away from the song or from his voice, and now that's gone.

Instrumentally, we see a lot of the same Rise Against that we've been given before, which is not a bad thing 'cause they never had an issue laying down the catchy hooks and what not.
Read more ›
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?