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Appetite for Destruction


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Audio, Cassette, 1987
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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Geffen
  • ASIN: B0002OQY2C
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (964 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #167,869 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

12 songs

Customer Reviews

A must buy for all metal fans and someone interested in GNR music.
Nick Mackler
Guns N' Roses was one of the better hair bands of the 80's, musically.
Dianne Papineau
Its Appetite for Destruction one of the best rock albums ever made.
Secret_Destroyer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

92 of 104 people found the following review helpful By "bulldog51" on October 27, 2000
Format: Audio CD
In 1987, Guns N' Roses exploded onto the national scene with "Appetite for Destruction." It was their first and best album. On the first track, "Welcome to the Jungle," Slash's beginning riffs and Axl's eerie howl set the stage for the rest of the songs. "Jungle" is a no-holds-barred look at the dark, drug-infested world beneath the glitz-and-glamour exterior of Los Angeles. "It's So Easy" shows the heart of the band: Axl's interplay with Slash and Izzy Straldlin. "Night Train" is another exploration of the sex, drug, and alcohol-fueled world of an L.A. club band at the time that Guns was coming up. "Out Ta Get Me" is the first glimpse of Axl's paranoia and self-absorption, which would ultimately lead to the band's downfall. "Mr. Brownstone" is a song about (surprise!) heroin, and with the lyrics "the show usually starts around 7. We go on stage around 9," it would prove prophetic about the chaotic nature of Guns N' Roses and their live concerts. "Paradise City" begins in (and the choruses return to) a Southern-Rock style, but is mostly the blues-and-punk-flavored hard rock that made them famous.
"My Michelle" is the darkest song Guns N' Roses ever produced. It's the semi-true story of a girl trying to grow up in L.A. without any support from her family, and then falling prey to the demons of wanton sex and drugs. "Think About You" is one of the most under-rated Guns songs. It's a sweet ballad about first love, but set to a hard-rock beat. Not a power-ballad, but a great song that never got the acclaim it deserved. "Sweet Child O' Mine" is another love song set to a rock beat, and showcases Slash's unique talents as a guitarist probably better than any other song on the record. "You're Crazy" shows the band's punk influences.
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369 of 443 people found the following review helpful By James F. Colobus on September 4, 2003
Format: Audio CD
One afternoon in 1986, I was relaxing in my bedroom after a long day at school when a song came on the radio that changed my life forever. Between the glorious screeching of the lead singer and the unforgettable guitar riffs, it sounded like nothing I'd ever heard. When the song was over, I listened intently until the DJ said, "That was `Welcome to the Jungle' by a band out of L.A. called Guns n Roses and they've just released an album titled Appetite for Destruction." I immediately called up my friend, Chris, and told him I'd just heard the most incredible song and filled him in on the details.
Chris could always be counted on to do the right thing so I wasn't particularly surprised when he showed up at my parents' house that night in his beloved beige Ford Escort with a brand new cassette in its tape deck. We picked up our Smiths-loving feminist friend, Cynthia, and headed down to Hampton. As `It's So Easy' blasted out of the Escort's cheap speakers, Cynthia's face turned crimson and she became enraged, "What is this crap?" she yelled.
"It's our new tape by Guns n Roses," Chris said in his most soothing voice, "Just relax and enjoy it."
"Turn around btch, I've got a use for you!," ordered Axl.
That was all Cynthia could take. "Turn that misogynistic sht off," Cynthia screamed.
Chris and I couldn't help but laugh. Cynthia was a good friend, but not that good. I mean we had just discovered perhaps the greatest album of all time and Cynthia wanted us to cut it off due to a few of Axl's more colorful turns of phrase. She'd have to endure it. And endure it she did - until "Rocket Queen" ended and we started it all over again. Probably not a night Cynthia recalls fondly, but Chris and I sure enjoyed it.
Then over time, a funny thing happened.
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38 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Todd Hagley on July 7, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Oh, it was something all right. This loud, chugging, brutal nasty song on the radio about a jungle that made us want to jump up and down. My siblings and I were mesmerized in our little adolescent world and fascinated by the music. The television jumped with a video of this gross yet oddly beautiful frontman on his knees while the audience tries to drag him into the maelstrom he created. The lanky bass player gives us this knowing wink on the downbeat while a top hated guitar player and some bored looking gypsy coax monstrous sounds out of their guitars. And it made our little suburban life look so dull.
Our joy and elation knew no bounds the day our dad came home from work with a slight detour at Turtle's Records and Tapes (ask your grandparents, kids) to buy something called a CD of that band's album. Rejoice, we thought, for musical enlightenment was moments away. We went berserk inside while my audiophile father put on the disc and turned the volume knob up unreasonably high. The thundering, echoing riff tore through our house and we danced with glee. The song finished, we giggled and grinned as the next song started and my whole outlook changed. It sounded like a train having a bullfight with a tornado. Sister in a Sunday dress? Why is the singer's voice so low and murky? Is that sleaze? Why isn't he high-pitched? Standing up? Think I'm so cool? Well of course...Oh my God....what did he just say?
And then I saw the look on my father's face change, and knew it surely matched the look on my mother's face while she was loading the dishwasher, trying to ignore the din from the den. My father's hand nearly tore the knob off the volume as he cut off the music and shuttered us out of the den; we knew our little party was over.
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