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Apple Aperture 3: A Workflow Guide for Digital Photographers Paperback – August 2, 2010

31 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0240521787 ISBN-10: 0240521781 Edition: 1st

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ken McMahon runs Pelican Graphics, a digital design consultancy specializing in design and artwork production for print media and the web. He is also a freelance journalist, writing for PCWorld, Mac User and PC Pro in the UK, and a best-selling author.
Nik is a UK-based journalist, formerly editor of MacUser magazine, and before that deputy editor of Personal Computer World. He is currently CNET's resident camera reviewer. He is the author of Independent Guide to the iPhone, Independent Guide to the iPad and Independent Guide to the Mac. He is also the co-author of Apple Aperture 3: A Workflow Guide for Digital Photographers, which is currently commissioned for an update this year when Apple releases the next revision of the software.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Focal Press; 1 edition (August 2, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0240521781
  • ISBN-13: 978-0240521787
  • Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 7.5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,072,840 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

69 of 74 people found the following review helpful By R. Kyle VINE VOICE on July 21, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Having gotten this book, from Vine, for my husband, here is his thoughts as detailed in an email to me. From this point on, the words are his.

First, I disagree with the authors who consider Aperture to primarily be a RAW processing program. Aperture is first and foremost a DAM, aka Digital Asset Management. This is readily visible when starting Aperture.

Next, there is the organization of the book. In chapter 2, page 66, is a section called "Using Aperture for the First Time". Really? Page 66? This needs to be more upfront. It does not get much better in regards to the organization.

On page 252, there are 2 paragraphs on trying to use Aperture with Adobe Lightroom. Come on! These are competing products. Why would someone want to go from Aperture to Lightroom? It makes no sense to me. iPhoto yes. I do that now so I can sync photos from Aperture to my iPhone via iPhoto.

Important things, like adjusting images is a single chapter called "Adjusting Images." Levels, while standard to most editing programs, can do so many things and yet in this book, it receives 2 paragraphs. Very light handling for something that can make such a difference to an image.

Plug-ins, the really neat stuff of Aperture, is barely covered. There are so many cool and wonderful plug-ins that the few mentioned might leave a reader wondering what all the fuss is about. All I can tell you is to do a web search on Aperture and plug-ins and open a whole new world to your workflow.

If it had been me, here is how the book would be organized. The numbers to the right of the chapter titles are the real chapter numbers.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Bryan Newman VINE VOICE on August 18, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was very fortunate to receive a copy of this book. I am a intermediate amateur photographer (ie, I use the histogram to check exposure, often consider aperture and shutterspeed, and understand there is something called digital image workflow,) but I am looking to take my photography to the next looking at upgrading to Aperture. So basically the author could have painted a target on my forehead.

But a big reason this book is perfect for me is that I am a beginner in many of the topics in the book. I think a more advanced photographer, especially someone who does a lot of post production already, may find large sections a little tedious. But it was spot on for me on.

Most of my shooting has been low res Jpeg's for web so I have never worried about shooting RAW before. After reading the first chapter on why you should shooting RAW images, I was sold, I immediately set both my Canon 10D and 40D to shoot RAW. I had known I was losing a little quality and functionality, but never realized how much I was losing by shooting jpegs. The author did a fantastic job of setting this foundation for working with Aperture.

After the first foundational chapter, the author does a great job of providing an overview of Aperture. I appreciated the time spent explaining how the editing tools worked. There were several things that seemed a little redundant, but the author made the subtleties clear. I appreciated the in depth look at how filters like sharpen worked. Also the sections on how to correct common issues was also very helpful. They did a nice job of walking through the processes to correct these and I loved how it demonstrated how the histograms could be used to verify what your eye is seeing.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Stuart Gitlow TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 19, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Photography texts are useful only to the extent that they address the needs of the given reader. As a photographer who still misses Tri-X and Kodachrome, and who thinks "ASA" each time he sees the "ISO" number, I've pegged myself as living in the 1970s. On the other hand, I'm using a Canon 50D with L-series lenses, shooting RAW format, and am easily able to modify and adjust my images using iPhoto. I've had Aperture for a while but haven't moved my library over nor have I started using the software beyond experimentation.

As other reviewers have noted, your experience may dictate that you start with Chapter 7, which includes moving your existing library over from iPhoto. Or you might find the basics unnecessary and start in with Chapter 5, which covers the logistics of adjusting your images using Aperture. Either way, the chapters stand alone sufficiently to allow you to find your way without much difficulty. One downside of the book production process is the lack of differentiation among the many color images that are incorporated. For example, page 16 shows three identical images, each with slight modifications to noise reduction and auto noise compensation. The three images should look different - that's the point of each of them being there. Yet in print the three images look essentially identical. Other than that rather minor issue, the text itself is quite explanatory and thorough.

This book, overall, is a reasonable user's guide for Aperture: an instruction manual that you can use to walk your way through understanding of each of Aperture's commands and capabilities while gaining an understanding as to how Aperture stores your photographic data. Pages are a matte gloss and there is extensive use of illustrations, both of photographs and of Aperture's interface. I found the book easy to maneuver and work with as I learned how to use Aperture.
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