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236 of 244 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is some Mac Mini
When this new Mac Mini was announced this week, I wondered if I should upgrade my 2011 Mini. However, when I saw that I could get a solid quad core processor in the mid-level Mini, I jumped. In terms of appearance, this year's Mac Mini looks exactly like last year's. The only differences are internal. Here are the big differences between the 2011 and 2012 Mac Mini:...
Published on October 27, 2012 by Steve

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39 of 48 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not super impressed, but its ok
I gave my 3 year old Macbook Pro (dual core i7 2.6GHz with 8MB ram and 7200 rpm HDD) to my Dad and got a 2012 Mac Mini to replace it (I don't need the portability of a laptop anymore). I knew that I was stepping down in HDD speed (to 5400 rpm) and ram (only 4GB), but I figured the newer quad core i7 would compensate.

I was wrong.

My new Mac Mini is...
Published on January 17, 2013 by CM


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236 of 244 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is some Mac Mini, October 27, 2012
By 
Steve (New York, New York) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Apple Mac Mini MD388LL/A Desktop (OLD VERSION) (Personal Computers)
When this new Mac Mini was announced this week, I wondered if I should upgrade my 2011 Mini. However, when I saw that I could get a solid quad core processor in the mid-level Mini, I jumped. In terms of appearance, this year's Mac Mini looks exactly like last year's. The only differences are internal. Here are the big differences between the 2011 and 2012 Mac Mini: (1) the processors are faster (as you would guess); (2) the mid-level Mac Mini now comes with a very fast quad core processor instead of a dual core; (3) the USB ports have been updated to USB 3 (which is much faster than USB 2); and (4) all models of the 2012 Mac Mini come with an integrated graphics card; there is no option for getting a discrete graphics card like last year (more on this later).

Both the mid-level Mac Mini and the server version have the same quad core processor, but the entry level Mac Mini is still a dual core. Why stick with a dual core processor desktop when you can have one with a quad core processor? So I got the mid-level model because I don't need a server, and other than the server's two hard drives, the mid-level Mini and the server model are exactly the same (e.g., same processor and same graphics card).

More on the graphics card: as noted earlier, ALL of the Mac Minis this year come with an integrated Intel HD 4000 graphics card. This is a much better card than last year's Intel HD 3000 graphics card, although some might want a discrete card for gaming. One thing I noticed about the Intel HD 4000 card in this year's Mac Mini is that it gives you 512 mb of video ram with only 4 GB of RAM installed. To my knowledge, all other Apple computers need at least 8 GB of RAM installed to get 512 mb of video ram from the HD 4000 card. This is a nice surprise. When I noticed this, I thought beef up the RAM to 8 GB and see if that increases the video ram--and it does. Installing 8 GB or more of RAM in this year's mid level Mac Mini (and I assume the same is true for the server Mini since these two machines are nearly identical) gives you 768 mb of video ram. I'd be willing to bet Apple increased the amount of maximum video ram from the HD 4000 card in this year's Mac Mini to compensate for removing the discrete graphics card option.

How does the new mid-level Mini perform? Well, I installed an SSD drive and 8 GB of RAM, and this thing just screams. Everything happens almost instantaneously when I click the mouse. No rainbow wheels, and one bounce at most from icons in the dock (often there is no bounce at all since things happen so fast). I compared my upgraded Mac Mini to last year's 27 inch iMac, and my Mac Mini seems much faster and snappier. Finally, Apple is starting to give the Mini some long overdue respect. The Mini is now becoming a machine people WANT instead of SETTLE FOR. To me, upgrading to this year's Mac Mini is well worth it.

UPDATE 03/12/2014: If you install Mavericks on this Mac Mini and have at least 4 GB of RAM installed, you will get 1024 of video ram. A nice bonus. And Mavericks runs very well on this Mac Mini.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast, wee, powerful and Firewire!, October 25, 2013
This review is from: Apple Mac Mini MD388LL/A Desktop (OLD VERSION) (Personal Computers)
My 2009 Mac Pro bought the farm--screw fell on the riser board--leaving an orphaned 27-inch LED Cinema Display. Since I owned a nice screen I didn't want an iMac and MacBook Pros were pricy for non-mobile use. So I ordered a Mac Mini with 2.6GHz Quad i7 processor, 4GM RAM and 1.2 TB Fusion drive.

SETUP: Easy setup is a hallmark of the Mac and my Mini was tweaked and operational in an hour. Installing the Crucial CT2C8G3S160BM, 16GB Kit (8GBx2) DDR3 1600 MHz (PC3-12800) CL11 SODIMM 204-Pin 1.35V/1.5V Memory Modules took 5 minutes: twist off the bottom cover, puck out old RAM, press in the new and replace the cover. I had a Carbon Copy clone of my Mac Pro HD on SSD and plugged it into the FW800 port of the Mini, using Migration Assistant to import settings, iTunes/Aperture folders, identity and apps. The apps transferred complete with serial numbers. My address books, email accounts and email were there, just like I left them on the old computer. Even the desktop looked the same, right down to the wallpaper and files I left out! A pro audio app with copy protection, e.g., Bias Peak Pro 7, needed to be re-authenticated. My work files were on external Firewire drives so I simply plugged them into the Mini. If you're okay with the supplied iWork apps you could be up and running in minutes.

I/O: Having four USB3 ports and one each of Thunderbolt, Firewire, HDMI and Gigabit Ethernet made for easy connection of new and legacy devices. Wish it had two Thunderbolt ports and/or an eSATA port but then there is a reason it's called a Mini. An integral SD card reader is included, albeit the rear panel is not a handy location. It read my SanDisk Extreme SD cards like a champ. I miss having a CD/DVD drive for importing audio tracks and ripping to iTunes so I forked over $75 for a slimline Apple USB Superdrive.

USING THE MINI: The Fusion drive feels like a fast SSD most of the time. Startup blazes in mere seconds. That's because it's a 128GB SSD linked to a 1TB mechanical drive, delivering SSD speed for OS and apps but with mechanical storage for data. As long as OS and apps pull off the SSD there is no spinup lag. Configured with 16GB RAM, 1.2TB Fusion drive and 2.6GHz i7, this wee computer handily beats my 2009 2.66GHz Quad Mac Pro (24GB RAM & 512GB SSD) at most tasks. It doesn't bury the old beast but zips past while processing audio plugins, converting large RAW image files, exporting video and other processor intensive tasks. Converting 22MP RAW image files to TIFF in Aperture flew like the wind. Many--not all--Topaz Photoshop plugins processed a couple times faster. And it did these things without breaking a sweat. Even after running all day, this wee computer is only warm to the touch. This Mini's verified NovaBench Score is 1101 vs 914 for my 2009 Mac Pro Quad Xeon.

Where the Mini falters are graphics intense tasks, e.g., processing plugins for HD video clips, displaying huge image files or hardcore gaming. My Mac Pro produces double frames rates over the Mini for 3D graphics and mega image files draw almost instantly. Although the Mini renders HD video clips faster than my old Mac Pro, the fans in the normally quiet Mini get really loud. The Mini's lack of a dedicated video card/processor makes little difference for general use: multitrack audio recording, Aperture/iPhoto editing and video play back are silky smooth. And video poker and other casino style games feel just like Vegas! But if you spend your day editing large HD clips, rendering 3D graphics or playing Grand Theft Auto, consider a high end iMac or recent Mac Pro.

Speaking of audio, the Mini is a great for audio tracking as it's normally quiet, takes up little space and is one of the few current Macs with a Firewire 800 port. If you're just getting into audio recording you won't care about Firewire. However, direct support for older audio interfaces like the MOTU Ultra or ProTools is a big deal for me. Adapters don't cut it (can't chain them and they're iffy with audio interfaces). I didn't want to drop a grand on a new USB audio interface, so buying a Mini with FW saved a lot of money. And, unlike video rendering, recording and processing hours of audio tracks in Bias Peak Pro and GarageBand doesn't awaken the fan. No problem using a mic a few feet from the Mini.

GOTCHAs: External Firewire drives worked perfectly under OS 10.8.3 (Lion) that shipped with my Mini. There is a bug in OS 10.9/10.91/10.92 Mavericks: FW drives otherwise work fine but don't spin down in sleep mode. No problems with external USB drives. OS 10.9.2 partially fixed it: FW drives spin down during system sleep and after ejecting but not during inactivity or when plugged into a FW hub. Finally, while the Thunderbolt port promises blazing fast speed, Thunderbolt devices are few and shockingly expensive. So far only my monitor uses the Thunderbolt port.

Yes, the wee size of the Mini is a novelty. But make no mistake, you get desktop performance in a tiny package: fast, powerful, cool running and ports for old Firewire devices and the newest USB and Thunderbolt flavors.

11/05/2014 Update: It's been well over a year of heavy use and my Mini is still going strong and without problems. If I were to "redo" my purchase I'd select a plain 256GB SSD drive rather than the 1TB Fusion drive. The SSD component of the Fusion drive is super fast but mechanical spin-up for data access is slow, i.e., similar to a 5400RPM notebook drive. I prefer a faster (7200RPM) USB3 external for data storage. Also, an update of the Mini just debuted, albeit with soldered on RAM, no quad core option, no SSD option and no FW. The "old" model looks like a better machine.
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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lightning Fast. I couldn't be happier., December 19, 2012
This review is from: Apple Mac Mini MD388LL/A Desktop (OLD VERSION) (Personal Computers)
A little background on why I chose a Mac Mini: In 2010, I bought a brand new 27" iMac. Two years later, I was already feeling ready for an upgrade--primarily due to the iMac's mobile GPU. I decided to buy a workstation PC for the long-term upgrade opportunities; after my experience with the iMac, that was my number one must-have feature.

However, being a graphic designer, I knew that I still wanted Mac OS to be a major part of my workflow. I considered a Macbook Pro, but didn't want to commit well over $2,000 to something with little to no upgradability. That brought me to the Mac Mini. I always knew about the product, but never took it seriously until I read some of the reviews for the latest 2012 model. After reading about its easily upgradable RAM and hard drive, coupled with the updated Intel graphics, I decided that the Mini would likely be the perfect partner to my PC and purchased the base $799 model from my local Apple store.

I could not be happier with the decision.

I immediately ordered the Corsair 16 GB RAM kit that Amazon recommended in the sidebar, and installed it (with zero issues) when it arrived the next day. I should note, though, that I did play around with the Mini a bit with the stock 4 GB of RAM. It was very snappy, and perfectly adequate for web browsing, e-mail, and listening to music. However, it got a bit sluggish when it came to chomping on Adobe CS6.

With the new RAM installed, however, this machine is lightning fast. A typical workflow for me consists of running (and simultaneously utilizing) a handful of apps: Sparrow/Mail, Safari, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Numbers, a text editor, and Pandora or Spotify. The Mini is absolutely making good use of the RAM, with about 4.5 GB free at the time of writing this with all of the aforementioned apps running with open projects. All the while, the Mini is extremely fast, handling everything I throw at it without a single hiccup.

It's extremely quiet, as well. In terms of temperature, it is not noticeably warm to the touch.

The bottom line: this is an incredibly cost-effective Mac. If your computing tasks don't require a powerful discrete GPU (or, if you have a PC workstation to handle those tasks), I can't imagine a more financially-efficient way to work with Mac OS.

Update #1 (Jan 5): I've been using this every day for work since purchasing without a single issue. In fact, it's a joy to use compared to my 2012 iMac. The processor is far quieter, and it's speeding through my workload (likely due to the 16 GB of RAM in the Mini versus the 8GB in my old iMac). I've noticed that there were several one star reviews for this Mini; after reading them, it seems that the majority of them note the HDMI video problems (now fixed via firmware, to my knowledge). Another cites clearly-advertised facts (limited expandability, lack of included keyboard/mouse) as major problems.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a great little computer!, June 24, 2013
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This review is from: Apple Mac Mini MD388LL/A Desktop (OLD VERSION) (Personal Computers)
This is a fantastic desktop PC. It makes almost no noise and can handle two displays very well! The only dislike was that when I upgraded it by adding a hard drive, it was quite challenging to disassemble the entire thing, but it has been rock solid in its operation like a Mac should be, so I am very happy with it.

Just FYI order the minimum spec HD and memory and upgrade those yourself. It can save a lot of money! I put 16 GB in this machine and a 500 GB SSD in the second drive bay, and use the 1 TB drive for extra space.
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39 of 48 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not super impressed, but its ok, January 17, 2013
By 
CM (Newhall, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Apple Mac Mini MD388LL/A Desktop (OLD VERSION) (Personal Computers)
I gave my 3 year old Macbook Pro (dual core i7 2.6GHz with 8MB ram and 7200 rpm HDD) to my Dad and got a 2012 Mac Mini to replace it (I don't need the portability of a laptop anymore). I knew that I was stepping down in HDD speed (to 5400 rpm) and ram (only 4GB), but I figured the newer quad core i7 would compensate.

I was wrong.

My new Mac Mini is slower than my 3 year old Macbook Pro....by a lot. Checked activity monitor and the amount of ram is not an issue and the CPU is barely being taxed, so the problem must lie in the slow hard drive. Its not terrible, but I'm used to a snappier system. I find myself waiting and staring at beach balls much more than I'd prefer. I'm going to put an SSD in as the primary drive and use the existing hard drive as secondary storage. Probably will bump up the RAM as well (had planned on doing this anyway...just didn't want to pay Apple's prices). Never was interested too much in the fusion drive as I prefer a dedicated SSD that I can manage myself. I'm sure the fusion drive would have been much faster out of the box, though, so I would recommend that to anyone who doesn't have the desire or know-how to put in an SSD on their own.

I do like the form factor of the Mac Mini and am happy about the USB 3.0 ports and that it retains a firewire 800 port (I have a lot of external drives that use this). I think once I upgrade the ram and add the ssd, it will fly. Just disappointed about the out of the box performance of my new Mac Mini.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great, but only if you upgrade the memory, February 22, 2014
By 
Bruce (New York, U.S.A.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Apple Mac Mini MD388LL/A Desktop (OLD VERSION) (Personal Computers)
I upgraded the memory to 16gb (which was very easy to do) and I am now very happy with this computer. However, before the upgrade it was sluggish even when running only a few fairly modest applications (e.g. a few browser windows, Word, Excel and Mac mail). More memory-intensive applications like Adobe Lightroom slowed things down to the point that it was very frustrating to use (e.g. I would sometimes click on a simple menu and watch the spinning beach ball for a full 10 seconds before anything happened).

I don't think you will be disappointed with this computer if you upgrade the memory to 16gb (or perhaps even 8gb would be sufficient), but be sure to factor the cost of the memory into the price of the computer, especially as memory is relatively expensive at the moment. It doesn't make sense to me why Apple would provide this computer with a highly capable core i7 processor and then impose a serious bottle-neck by providing too little memory. If you cannot afford the memory upgrade you may do better to go with the cheaper core i5 Mac Mini and use the extra cash to upgrade the memory.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best value in the entire Apple lineup, January 7, 2013
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This review is from: Apple Mac Mini MD388LL/A Desktop (OLD VERSION) (Personal Computers)
For the money this thing is fantastic. I upgraded to a 256GB Samsung 840 Pro SSD (there is another chassis so you can have the original 1TB drive in the mini as well), and 16GB of Corsair memory. It is running flawlessly. Super fast, literally dead silent operation. It is actually really strange when it is on because there is no noise whatsoever. Great for recording due to that fact. I have it hooked up to a Dell 30" monitor with a Display to Mini-Display cable. It is running at 2560x1600 resolution like a champ. I have even played games like Heroes of Newerth, Portal 2, and Half Life 2, and they run surprisingly well at full resolution. The HD4000 video processor with the ram is a killer combo for this compact unit. It actually allocates more memory to the video when you have 16GB which definitely has helped in the games I have played. I am no Mac fanboy by any means, and in general I think their products are overpriced, but I can't say the same for this little guy. If you upgrade the hard drive and memory yourself (easy to do) it really is one of the best values around.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very happy now - but I had a couple of hiccups, February 23, 2013
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This review is from: Apple Mac Mini MD388LL/A Desktop (OLD VERSION) (Personal Computers)
I'm happy that I bought it now, but I want to share some issues that I experienced that might help you. I'm assuming that you're already familiar with Mac OS X versus Windows, so I'll focus on my personal experience with this.

I tend to use Macs for laptops (my latest is a mid-2011 MB Air that I really like) and Windows for desktops, but I decided to purchase this after my older brother (who is very experienced with Macs) bought one and told me how dead silent it is. He's used several Minis over the years, and has always praised them for being so quiet. I knew that for the money, I could get a better performing (for my purposes) Windows machine - but I craved a silent computer. The HP that I use for gaming is kind of loud, and I have a Dell with worse specs than this Mini that is pretty quiet but not silent. So...the promise of silence is what ultimately got me to spend $800 on this. After turning it on, though, it was anything but silent. I thought that my brother must be deaf, because I could easily hear the hard drive running and (I thought) the fan blowing. It was louder than my Dell. My regret level was at Expert. I couldn't believe that I spent this much for something that was louder than what I already owned. I'll cut to the chase - it was all the hard drive. It must be defective or was damaged in shipping, because yesterday I swapped it out for an SSD, and now it is SILENT. What I thought was the fan was actually the drive, too. Ahhhh. :D This is what I had wanted all along. I had planned to add an SSD and create a Fusion drive, but not any more. At least, not with the drive that came with mine.

I wanted to relay that because I figure that my drive might not be an isolated case. So, if you get one that is loud (even if you actually think it's the fan blowing like I did), you might also have a bad drive.

Also, I had planned on connecting this to my new BenQ monitor using an HDMI connection. However, the HDMI connection to my monitor yields sub-par performance, with fonts looking "blocky." I've manually set font smoothing using a command line, but it didn't help. From my research, it isn't uncommon for Macs to recognize some monitors as televisions when connected using HDMI, which I believe results in the wrong color calibration being applied. I still haven't found any way to adjust it on the Mini. Using the included HDMI-to-DVI adapter did the trick, but I was disappointed because I wanted to use the DVI input on my monitor for a different computer. My mentality is that, for something that "just works," the HDMI connection should have worked.

With the SSD installed and the DVI connection in place, I'm past those issues. The performance is good, and it plays nice with my Windows keyboard and mouse. The integrated graphics won't touch a discrete graphics card for gaming, but this isn't a gaming machine. It actually does decent on StarCraft II, well enough for me to use it instead of my HP desktop because...at least now...it's almost silent even after playing for a while. Losing the drone of computer fans is worth it to me. :)

As a note, Other World Computing has some very helpful videos on their site for either replacing the hard drive or adding one for a Fusion drive. Replacing the drive is less involved, and I did it in about an hour. It looked daunting at first, but it really wasn't too difficult once I started into it. I bought their Data Doubler kit, and while I decided not to use my stock drive for a Fusion drive, it did come with all the tools that I needed to replace the drive.

Pros
-----
(*) Relatively tiny. Enormously smaller than my other desktop computers.
(*) Nearly silent with an SSD.
(*) Good performance. Wicked fast with an SSD.
(*) Incredibly easy to swap out the RAM.
(*) USB 3

Cons
-----
(*) Integrated graphics. This isn't a gaming machine, I know, but I think it's worth noting.
(*) Stock 5400 RPM hard drive is a bit slow

Hiccups
---------
These issues are why I "like" it and don't "love" it.
(*) The stock hard drive that came in mine was loud. Abnormally loud. I believe it to be defective because my brother didn't have this issue.
(*) The HDMI connection to my monitor yields sub-par performance, with fonts looking "blocky," because the Mac shows the monitor as being a television. My brother saw this on one of his monitors, too, but not on another one. So, not all monitors will have this issue.

Recommendations
---------------------
Like others have said, add in more RAM (it's incredibly easy to do) and get an SSD. I almost bought the SSD upgrade from the beginning, but I wanted to try out the 5400 RPM drive and see if I could save some money. Performance wasn't horrible, but even ignoring the defectively loud noise on mine, I do recommend going with an SSD if you can afford it - it's much, much faster.
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33 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite an upgrade. Much snappier., October 31, 2012
This review is from: Apple Mac Mini MD388LL/A Desktop (OLD VERSION) (Personal Computers)
I have been using the previous generation high-end Mac Mini at work for some time. I have always felt that this previous top-of-the-line model felt sluggish, experienced long delays when opening programs, was slow to move between full screen programs, and had relatively slow Parallels/Windows 7 performance. This new Mini is what the previous generation should have been. Very fast and responsive, seamless switching between desktops, and fast Windows 7 performance via Parallels. I had been tempted to wait for one more iteration, but I am glad I updated to the October 2012 model.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic for Video Editing and Music Production, February 20, 2013
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This review is from: Apple Mac Mini MD388LL/A Desktop (OLD VERSION) (Personal Computers)
Before I begin, know that I am reviewing this as an upgraded machine with 16 gigs of corsair vengeance RAM and a samsung 840 pro 256gig SSD. (Upgraded myself in about 30 minutes total.)

I have to admit, I was very skeptical about purchasing this machine, despite great benchmarks, solely because of this integrated graphics card that it uses. Without the option of upgrading the GPU, I was unsure how it would perform for my purposes. My main uses of this machine were to be for editing video in final cut pro and recording and mixing music in Logic 9.

I am happy to say that thus far, it has excelled in both of these areas.

The Intel HD 4000 integrated graphics in this computer have been surprisingly quick and provided gorgeous graphics. Although I have not been using it for gaming, I have been doing some rather intensive video editing, and it has been holding up flawlessly. I have mainly been editing video in 1080p, but have tested it out at 2.7k 30fps and even 4k 15 fps, and it performed exceptionally. The 4-core i7 was running at about 70% but there was absolutely no lag. Rendering times have decreased dramatically compared to my 2008 core 2 duo macbook pro.

This thing is a little beast.

For music production, it has been perfect because it is absolutely silent. I should mention, however, that one of the main reasons for this is due to the silence of the SSD. With that installed, it is literally silent.

With all this being said, I would not necessarily recommend this machine unless you are planning to upgrade the RAM and hard drive. The standard 5400rpm drive is slow and noisy compared to the samsung 840 pro SSD. And the standard 4 gb RAM is not nearly enough to do anything useful (at least not running mountain lion). It is however, quite easy to do this upgrade at home, just search youtube for a guide.

Overall, this is the quickest machine I have ever used, and it is well worth the price. If you are looking for something small, sleek, quiet, speedy, and capable of video and audio production at a low cost, this is the machine for you.

--Benchmarks--

Geekbench: 10794

Disk benchmarks using blackmagic disk speed test:
Write: 485 mb/s
Read: 525 mb/s
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