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Applied Channel Theory in Chinese Medicine Wang Ju-Yi's Lectures on Channel Therapeutics Hardcover – April 14, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0939616626 ISBN-10: 0939616629 Edition: 1st

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Applied Channel Theory in Chinese Medicine Wang Ju-Yi's Lectures on Channel Therapeutics + The Channels of Acupuncture: Clinical Use of the Secondary Channels and Eight Extraordinary Vessels, 1e + Chinese Acupuncture and Moxibustion (Third Edition 2010, Fifteenth Printing 2014)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 718 pages
  • Publisher: Eastland Press; 1 edition (April 14, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0939616629
  • ISBN-13: 978-0939616626
  • Product Dimensions: 1.8 x 7.2 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #92,449 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

For those of you reading this text, I fervently hope that you will not become trapped in the surface of acupuncture therapy, striving only to learn experiential points from your teachers and colleagues. Bring the medicine to life by incorporating the system of channel theory, expand its applications, and innovate from a place of theoretical integrity. The field of acupuncture must continue to develop and expand, treating the new diseases of the modern era while always keeping a firm grasp on the basics. --Wang Ju-Yi, Preface

About the Author

Wang Ju-Yi is a member of the first graduating class of the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (1962) and has practiced Chinese medicine for over 45 years. After three decades of seeing patients at the Xuan Wu Hospital of Chinese Medicine in Beijing, Dr. Wang retired to edit the prestigious journal Chinese Acupuncture. He has also been a pioneer in developing a private Chinese medical prac¬tice in the quickly changing environment of modern Beijing. Jason D. Robertson is a graduate of the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine (San Francisco). He has lived and worked in China and Taiwan for over eight years. He studied Chinese language at Washington and Lee University, and then completed a post-graduate language program at Taiwan Normal University. Mr. Robertson currently maintains a private practice in Seattle, and is on the faculty of the Seattle Institute of Oriental Medicine.

Customer Reviews

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I'm going through this book a second time and getting much more out of my second read.
Sakowich
I highly recommend this book to any practitioner of Chinese Medicine or anyone interested in a very accessible explanation of Chinese Medical theory.
Ericka J.
The book is well written, in good English, which makes it easy to concentrate on the nuances of theory & technique.
Deborah Malone

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Ericka J. on August 2, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have to say a big thank you to the authors of this book for so painstakingly putting their hearts into making Classical Channel Theory so accessible and practical. There are many books out there with great information on Chinese Theory but few offer the same depth of clarity on to how to integrate that information into practice. There is not one Chinese Medical textbook on my shelf that I have read cover to cover like I did this one; the writing is engaging, succinct and sometimes very moving.

Coming from a background of classical acupuncture, channel theory was left out in our training and everyone was scrambling to take continuing education classes on this topic from classically trained practitioners after they graduated. Not having the funds or the time to take these classes I felt like I was missing out on a very important aspect of Chinese Medicine. After reading this book I can honestly say I feel like I have a firm foundation of Channel Theory to integrate into my practice. I have already seen dramatic changes in the outcome of my treatments and love the fact that I use much fewer needles to accomplish this. It is hard to express in words without sounding trite how valuable this book has been to me.

I highly recommend this book to any practitioner of Chinese Medicine or anyone interested in a very accessible explanation of Chinese Medical theory.
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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Kyle Pow on July 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is the book I wish I had written!!

It is simply one of the most fascinating and pracitical books on Traditional Chinese medicine to heve emerged in recent years. As Dr Wang himself said to his student and collaborator Jason D Robertson, you should not write "just another boring text book..." And that wish has certainly been fulfilled. This book is an exciting read, that draws together both the wisdom of the classics with current clinical practice. The text is very much alive, written as a conversational dialectic between Dr Wang and Jason D, in the time-honoured tradition of Huang Di and his physician Qi Bo, in the Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine. It addresses and repairs many of holes that the Cultural Revolution blew in Chinese Medicine and firmly 're-embodies' acupuncture energetics within the reality of the channel networks. Well done! Bravo! Gong Xi!
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By R. Lowry on February 20, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have a strong background in pure TCM from my school, and this book is so much more interesting and usable than Fundamentals of Chinese Medicine is. He even has a couple gems on herbalism interspersed in this book too. It has a lot of depth on Chinese Physiology yet is a pretty easy read (for a practitioner or upper-year student). I am not even near finished yet but I appreciate how it is layed out so far.

It seems like TCM is a conglomerate of disjointed empirical points that merely skims over the channels and wider connections within the body. This book on the other hand doesn't have a spleen chapter and a lung chapter, it has a Tai Yin chapter that breaks itself down into Lung and Spleen. It gives you so much info on how they are related that TCM doesn't delve into. It does go in microscopically and has some pretty nice speculations thrown in about Western Medical parallels which I found useful. But its the fact that it backs up and sees the interrelations that are system wide and more trully holistic that really helps me see the big picture, both literally and figuretively. It does not contradict my TCM training but only a few times from what I've read so far, yet it helps me apply the classics more and deepens my understanding. My intent seems to be sharper during treatments form just the little that I have read. I highly recommend this book to Acupuncturists of ALL styles.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Chan Joon Yee on October 29, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If the title doesn't suggest the seriousness of the topic, the casual reader should first be warned that this is actually a textbook on classical Chinese acupuncture written in a relatively lively and unconventional manner. It is not for casual reading and it is very heavy on authentic TCM theories which are often not applied when practising acupuncture in the West. Though a lot of points are mentioned and even a bit of point location technique is featured, this is not an atlas of meridians and their acupuncture points. For serious students of authentic Chinese acupucnture, it's simply one of the best and most detailed English-language books on the meridian or channel theory.

In a style similar to Huangdi Neijing, the book features "conversations" between master and apprentice. There are also snippets on interesting encounters inside and outside clinical practice in China, giving the reader some social and cultural insights into the country where TCM originated.

The book covers basic TCM principles from an acupuncturist's perspective. Instead of covering the zang and fu organs on their own, the book, pairs organs according to channels and discusses them together. For example, taiyin channels and their related organs, lung and spleen are covered under the one chapter. The shaoyin organs (heart, kidneys), jueyin organs (liver, pericardium), taiyang organs (bladder, small intestine), shaoyang (gall bladder, triple burner)and yangming (large intestine, stomach) channels are likewise paired and discussed together. This offers a unique perspective to our understanding of organ and channel "physiology".

The book also goes into details on channel "physiology", transport points, point selection, needling techniques etc.
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