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40 of 40 people found the following review helpful
on August 3, 2009
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I have to say a big thank you to the authors of this book for so painstakingly putting their hearts into making Classical Channel Theory so accessible and practical. There are many books out there with great information on Chinese Theory but few offer the same depth of clarity on to how to integrate that information into practice. There is not one Chinese Medical textbook on my shelf that I have read cover to cover like I did this one; the writing is engaging, succinct and sometimes very moving.

Coming from a background of classical acupuncture, channel theory was left out in our training and everyone was scrambling to take continuing education classes on this topic from classically trained practitioners after they graduated. Not having the funds or the time to take these classes I felt like I was missing out on a very important aspect of Chinese Medicine. After reading this book I can honestly say I feel like I have a firm foundation of Channel Theory to integrate into my practice. I have already seen dramatic changes in the outcome of my treatments and love the fact that I use much fewer needles to accomplish this. It is hard to express in words without sounding trite how valuable this book has been to me.

I highly recommend this book to any practitioner of Chinese Medicine or anyone interested in a very accessible explanation of Chinese Medical theory.
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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful
on July 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is the book I wish I had written!!

It is simply one of the most fascinating and pracitical books on Traditional Chinese medicine to heve emerged in recent years. As Dr Wang himself said to his student and collaborator Jason D Robertson, you should not write "just another boring text book..." And that wish has certainly been fulfilled. This book is an exciting read, that draws together both the wisdom of the classics with current clinical practice. The text is very much alive, written as a conversational dialectic between Dr Wang and Jason D, in the time-honoured tradition of Huang Di and his physician Qi Bo, in the Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine. It addresses and repairs many of holes that the Cultural Revolution blew in Chinese Medicine and firmly 're-embodies' acupuncture energetics within the reality of the channel networks. Well done! Bravo! Gong Xi!
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on February 20, 2009
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I have a strong background in pure TCM from my school, and this book is so much more interesting and usable than Fundamentals of Chinese Medicine is. He even has a couple gems on herbalism interspersed in this book too. It has a lot of depth on Chinese Physiology yet is a pretty easy read (for a practitioner or upper-year student). I am not even near finished yet but I appreciate how it is layed out so far.

It seems like TCM is a conglomerate of disjointed empirical points that merely skims over the channels and wider connections within the body. This book on the other hand doesn't have a spleen chapter and a lung chapter, it has a Tai Yin chapter that breaks itself down into Lung and Spleen. It gives you so much info on how they are related that TCM doesn't delve into. It does go in microscopically and has some pretty nice speculations thrown in about Western Medical parallels which I found useful. But its the fact that it backs up and sees the interrelations that are system wide and more trully holistic that really helps me see the big picture, both literally and figuretively. It does not contradict my TCM training but only a few times from what I've read so far, yet it helps me apply the classics more and deepens my understanding. My intent seems to be sharper during treatments form just the little that I have read. I highly recommend this book to Acupuncturists of ALL styles.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on October 29, 2010
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
If the title doesn't suggest the seriousness of the topic, the casual reader should first be warned that this is actually a textbook on classical Chinese acupuncture written in a relatively lively and unconventional manner. It is not for casual reading and it is very heavy on authentic TCM theories which are often not applied when practising acupuncture in the West. Though a lot of points are mentioned and even a bit of point location technique is featured, this is not an atlas of meridians and their acupuncture points. For serious students of authentic Chinese acupucnture, it's simply one of the best and most detailed English-language books on the meridian or channel theory.

In a style similar to Huangdi Neijing, the book features "conversations" between master and apprentice. There are also snippets on interesting encounters inside and outside clinical practice in China, giving the reader some social and cultural insights into the country where TCM originated.

The book covers basic TCM principles from an acupuncturist's perspective. Instead of covering the zang and fu organs on their own, the book, pairs organs according to channels and discusses them together. For example, taiyin channels and their related organs, lung and spleen are covered under the one chapter. The shaoyin organs (heart, kidneys), jueyin organs (liver, pericardium), taiyang organs (bladder, small intestine), shaoyang (gall bladder, triple burner)and yangming (large intestine, stomach) channels are likewise paired and discussed together. This offers a unique perspective to our understanding of organ and channel "physiology".

The book also goes into details on channel "physiology", transport points, point selection, needling techniques etc. The most distinguishing feature is the use of channel palpation to identify nodules and other abnormalities along a channel to pinpoint the organ involved. This emphasis on organ differentiation technique sets this book apart from most other TCM books which dwell on 8-principle differentiation based soley on observation, smelling, asking and pulse taking.

It takes a lot of time and re-reading to digest the material here, but once the reader has grasped the principles, it will greatly improve his/her understanding of the complex theory behind acupucnture.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on November 23, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Applied Channel Theory is a misleading title for a deeper book. When I bought it I realized It started again chinese medicine theory but, fortunately, in a rather different way than other texts. It is more narrative than academic, and it enters into a profound explanation of physiology with practical implications. The main issue is you notice chinese medicine is not a simple system to apply directly from a course, but you must study a lot: first deep knowledge about human body, after points. Perhaps it is very obvious, but as western doctor I did not find this approach after buying and buying books or listening people explaining chinese medicine in courses, which it is so far long from the five phases or yin-yang. I recommend the book if you are looking for chinese body physiology and stressed concerning of channels employment.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on November 7, 2008
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Quite simply, this book is an underrated classic. One gets the best of both worlds in that it is a true collaborative work between a seasoned and experienced Chinese doctor and his American counterpart. I most appreciate the usage of Mr. Robertson of chinese character analysis in order to dissect the deeper meanings of the concepts being studied.

A treasure.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
This book is one of the BEST books on channel theory and acupuncture available in English! I was fortunate to receive my copy shortly after it was published (2008) and refer to the text often, as it is clinically invaluable. Jason Robertson has done an amazing job compiling, translating and transcribing this text based on 40 years of clinical experience of Dr. Wang Ju-Yi.

This book offers the reader a clear poetic description and function of each channel, key acupuncture points including a detailed explanation of the Five Transport points, point pairs, acupuncture techniques and Dr. Wang's pearls of wisdom on the palpation of each channel and how to do a channel diagnosis.

The book is well edited with beautiful illustrations.

If you are looking to deepen your knowledge and re-inspire your love of acupuncture get this book!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on July 8, 2011
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I've got lots and lots of books on acupuncture and have studied and practiced lots of different styles and I have to say that this is by far the most impressive book that I have read on channel theory. Channels or 'meridians' are surprisingly not very well understood by many, if not most, acupuncturists. The fault is really not their own as there is really not much in-depth written on them (in English at least). This book examines the channels thoroughly and gives many useful clinical and diagnostic insights that you will not find in the required texts in school. Dr. Wang Ju-Yi is a treasure and the co-author who has translated and summarized his work is genius. God bless them both.

The book is not just another dense text of channels and points like the rest. It is mixed with artfully told stories, informative Q&A's, and brilliant insights and theory into channel anatomy and physiology. I especially liked the discussion on the 8 extraordinary channels and the San Jiao and how they are in many ways synonymous with the extracellular matrix. Using these associated points was a big breakthrough for me clinically before reading this and now I know why. Understanding and linking the ancient terminology and theory with the modern scientific understanding is key for the future of acupuncture and I am glad to see the authors give it due attention.

I hope, for the sake of those entering acupuncture school in the near future (& their patients), that this book very soon becomes THE required text. This and the Deadman text are really all that are needed to study and learn channel theory and acupuncture anatomy in school. (BOARDS: Please dump CAM already!!)
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on August 10, 2010
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Dr Wang visited my school in the late 1990's and I loved the work he did. He had to leave too soon for me!
So I was very pleased to see that he came out with a book on his method of diagnosis using palpation of the
meridians, which is fascinating and provides a whole new level of diagnostic information.
The book is well written, in good English, which makes it easy to concentrate on the nuances of theory & technique.
This is not a book for beginners, although basic theory is discussed. I have a deeper understanding of organ
function and the meaning of various conditions felt during palpation of the channels after
reading this book & will be re-reading it for many months. It is well worth the time. Thank you
Dr. Wang for sharing your knowledge & expertise and thank you Jason D Robertson for interpreting
the information so clearly. I also really liked the writing style - combining the question/answer
style of the ancient classics with a more modern didactic style.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
This is a great textbook in easy to understand language---not Chinglish! Not traditional TCM language! But easy for all to read and understand!
The explanation is well written and described and the info is given in depth and detail. A must have for all students interested in TCM and channel theory. The best reading on TCM (textbook) ever!!!
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