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Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Northeastern North America, Volume I: A Revised and Enlarged Edition of Norman C. Fassett's A Manual of Aquatic Plants, ... Gymnosperms, and Angiosperms: Dicotyledons Hardcover – June 22, 2000


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About the Author

Garrett E. Crow is professor of botany at the University of New Hampshire.
C. Barre Hellquist is professor of biology at the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts.

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Product Details

  • Series: Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Northeastern North America (Book 1)
  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press; 1 edition (June 22, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 029916330X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0299163303
  • Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 8.7 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,101,074 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Kalma on April 26, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Because the volumes use keys and employ technical botanical terms, they are more useful for people with some background in plant identification. There are illustrations (of variable quality and utility), but these are not books that you can thumb through to identify specimens. All of the species included are wetland species and it is a nice idea to have them in a single reference.
My main complaints with the volumes are: 1) they do not contain all the wetland species you are likely find in a wetland and do not indicate where they are incomplete. You could easily key out a specimen and come up with an incorrect identification because you have a species they omitted; 2) there are always some non-wetland species in a wetland and these are not covered in the volumes. Again you can come up with an incorrect identification.
For these reasons the volumes make false identifications likely. And, if you can recognize when they are leading you astray, you've already passed through the level where they could be useful.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I used this guide on Isle Royale the summer of 2012 to identify macrophytes of the eastern inland lakes. As a dichotomous key this guide is huge in terms of volume, not descriptions. The beauties of this guide are all of the illustrative diagrams of the plant parts (a lot where carried over from Norman C. Fassett's "A Manual of Aquatic Plants"). For the size of the guide it is a little disappointing that there are no overall description of each species' traits. The dichotomous key can be somewhat vague because of the size ranges of plant parts (leaves, seed, stems, etc.) can vary enormously. The major issue I take with this is the dichotomous key relies heavily on reproductive parts. If you try to identify the plant in the early season before those organs are identifiable you will not be able to identify or maybe even ballpark what species you are looking at if you are only using this description-less guide. This guide is good when the species has reproductive parts, however, it is still not great. Essential in the Midwest as an aquatic plant guide you can cross-reference with other guides.
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Format: Paperback
Speaking as a naturalist, I find both Volume 1 and Volume 2 of this series are excellent books. They are not field guides though, and the illustrations are black-and-white line drawings, so if what you are looking for is a pocket field guide these are not the books for you.

The information is well presented and the illustrations are clear. The keys are focused on distinctive features and are easy to follow. That being said, these books are best used by someone with at least some botanical background, and they wee originally written back in the 1950s. They have been updated, but our understanding of the relationships between plant species changes rapidly and some of the names may be older ones, and some of the species may have been broken into several different species since the writing of these books.

If you are a naturalist, botanist, or just interested in wetland plants these are great books.
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