Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Ararat (American Poetry Series) Paperback – June 21, 1992


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, June 21, 1992
$1.93 $0.01

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A ruthlessly probing family portrait in verse, Gluck's sixth poetry collection confronts, with devastating irony, her father's hollow life and her mother's inability to express emotion. This might seem like a daughter's belated rebellion, except that these fierce, rock-strong, deeply felt lyrics are steeled by love and understanding. The stuff of private pyschodrama is here: a withdrawn, too-obedient child's self-denial engendered by a sibling rivalry; the shattering death of an infant sister; learning to forgive her parents, to love her son. Gluck (whose last book, The Triumph of Achilles , won a National Book Critics Circle Award) transforms these domestic materials into an act of naked self-confrontation in heartrendingly beautiful, uncompromising poems.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

In her fifth book since 1968, Gluck writes introspective poems about her mother and sister, her mother's lost child, the death of her father, a family bound by silences, and a need "to make something whole." Family obsessions are offset by a desire for self-understanding: "In my own mind, I'm invisible: that's why I'm dangerous./ People like me, who seem selfless/ . . . should be factored out/ in the interest of truth." Gluck's "powers of language" seem "wasted" because the mind is skewed by the impermanence of love. Still, one reads Gluck's poems to discover how well she can articulate truths of selfhood. More open and personal than her previous work, these poems offer insights that are painful yet tinged with pleasure and clarified by the knowledge that the price of an "act of creation" is loss.
- Frank Allen, Regents Coll., Albany, N.Y.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: American Poetry Series
  • Paperback: 68 pages
  • Publisher: Ecco; Reprint edition (June 21, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 088001248X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0880012485
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #554,958 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
Probably the most influential book of poetry published in the language in the last two decades; solidified (and spawned a generation of mimics of) what is now widely recognized as The Gluck Style: spare, unblinking but not unflinching, tough, mournful, deceptively simple. The book, rightfully, that all her other books (except The Wild Iris) may be judged. "Long ago I was wounded.." it begins. Gluck turns away from alluding to a specific mythology (though she runs back to it in Meadowlands and Vita Nova; though, in fact, Ararat itself is a Jewish myth) to read the mythology of domesticity: her father the hero, her sister the Fury, her mother like Dido, herself like Euridice, whose only hope of escaping is to turn completely away. But Gluck was "born to a vocation," to bear witness to the great and ordinary mysteries, the death of her father, the death of a sister, the ache and hunger repeated infinitely within her drama of four, the view of her family that will reduce her to ashes in the act of witnessing. "Like Adam, I was the firstborn. Believe me, you never heal. You never forget the ache in your side where something was taken to make another person." She accomplishes all: poetry, drama, narrative. And somehow she escapes the cheap glamour of confessional poetry. These are painfully honest pieces that she somehow also keeps at arm's length, to examine like an artifact. By all means, read this book. The language and imagery and syntax are easy, unintimidating, and then you realize that she has laid out quite plainly the way people love and harbor and reject one another. "Long ago, I was wounded. I thought that pain meant I was not loved. It meant I loved."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By rizabiz on July 27, 2004
Format: Paperback
Gluck is an amazing poet and one of the wonders of her work is that it is meant to be read like a book: front to back. This book describes her loss of her father and sister and how she has dealt with this through life, with her mother and her son. An amazing work that every poem sticks and is valuable to the collection. My favorite is Fantasy-- which is such an in tune description on loss, describing how one might describe death when they were at a loss for words.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
After a friend of mine recommended Gluck's poetry to me, I bought Ararat at the local bookstore and it sat on my shelf for months. Finally, when I found the time, I sat down and read it. I thought about it. And then I read it again. It is a phenomenal book. What I especially enjoy is Gluck's approach to writing a complete sequence of poems, which she then encloses in a "book." Story or myth, call it what you will--behind these poems is a disciplined passion, a sort of genius that I appreciate. READ IT, I promise you won't be sorry.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By CheezLouise on December 23, 2012
Format: Paperback
Louise Gluck has always captivated me. Her poetry is dark and painful but real and beautiful. Ararat, an exploration of childhood pain and death, is one of the rare books of poetry in which I like almost every poem. Absolutely recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 14, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Through "ARARAT" I discovered Louise Glück,my most favorite living poet on this planet.Every book she created is deep,elegant and mystifying.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Frequently Bought Together

Ararat (American Poetry Series) + Wild Iris
Buy the selected items together
  • Wild Iris $11.85