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Ararat


Price: $16.79 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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Product Details

  • Actors: Brent Carver, Bruce Greenwood, Arsinée Khanjian, Elias Koteas, Christie MacFadyen
  • Directors: Atom Egoyan
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Miramax
  • DVD Release Date: July 22, 2003
  • Run Time: 115 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (104 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005JLR5
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,707 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Ararat" on IMDb

Special Features

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Editorial Reviews

From the Academy Award(R)-nominated director Atom Egoyan (Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, THE SWEET HEREAFTER, 1997; EXOTICA, FELICIA'S JOURNEY), and featuring an all-star cast, ARARAT is the acclaimed cinematic masterpiece about a tragic historical event, a country in denial, and a people yearning for the truth. For the estranged members of a contemporary family, the tangled relationships of their present are only complicated by their catastrophic past. And what begins as a search for clues becomes a determined quest for answers across a vast and ancient terrain of deception, denial, fact, and fears. This stunning and passionate motion picture explores the pursuit of identity through the intimate moments shared by lovers, families, enemies, and strangers.

Customer Reviews

2 disc movie only one disc played.
belinda s cupe
Without it, the film would lose much of it's power. "Ararat" is, principally, a film about the complexity of memory.
Nairi
The Armenian genocide constitutes one of the twentieth century's most shameful incidents.
Jeffrey Leach

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 42 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 30, 2002
Verified Purchase
If you're into typical hollywood movies (action, sex, violence) this is not the movie for you...go watch the James Bond flick instead. There is one sex scene, some violence and a rape scene. The movie is not perfect (I thought the sex scene was not necessary), but it makes up for the shortcomings in many other ways.
It is a very thought-provoking, multi-dimensional movie about one of the most horrific crimes of the 20th century, the Armenian Genocide....beware that you can't blink or you'll miss a plot or two. This film is not a documentary about the Armenian Genocide. It is about the modern day lives of people that are impacted by the genocide (denial). I don't think this will do any justice in teaching about the Genocide to people that don't know much about it. The current politics of the denial are concealed in the many sub-plots throughout the movie.
I watched the film last night and I'm still thinking about it and analyzing it with others. There are too many stories and plots in this film. I'm going to watch it again to get a grasp of everything that was happening.
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45 of 54 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 23, 2002
The question, of course, is how you approach a topic as vastly horrific as the Armenian Genocide without leaving your audience overwhelmed and numb. The answer is that you tell another story against the backdrop of the unfathomable horrors, thereby giving your audience just enough of a hint of the horrors without drowning them in it.
Spielberg pulled off this device pretty well in "Schindler's List". You see the ovens of Auschwitz, but not the people actually burned in them. You see the piles of bodies, but not them being slaughtered.
In "Ararat" they tell the story of the making of a film about the Armenian Genocide, and inside that is the story of an Armenian American artist named Gorky who survived those horrors. Placing the scenes of mass murder, gang rape, and atrocity upon atrocity as a film-within-a-film provides enough emotional space to make these horrors psychologically manageable.
While the film is very, very good, I'm not sure that the director pulled off the trick completely. I think his missed the mark of greatness. The subplots got a little busy and soap-opera-ish, in my opinion.
There was an unrelated suicide, something about a terrorist attack. Apparently some statement on gay rights. Quasi-incest. Heroin smuggling. I dunno. I didn't see the point in all of that.
The story of the gay son of the customs agent and his Turkish Canadian lover was over the top, out of place. Was the intent seriously to compare the plight of a middle class gay couple in Toronto in 2001 to the horrors of Lake Van in 1915? I hope not, for that would be the worst sort of blasphemy.
Also the story of the young Armenian Canadian protaganist and his semi-incestuous relationship with his step-sister was just bizarre. What was the point of that?
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36 of 44 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 6, 2002
Verified Purchase
an armenian friend called me two weekends ago and invited me to see 'ararat'. he warned me that the movie's subject is genocide. although this isn't something i usually venture into the theaters for - i tend to use hollywood to escape reality - i went anyhow...
this is the third egoyan movie i have seen in a theater - exotica was my first, the sweet hereafter was my second. each was a unique experience and i truly can say cannot be compared to ararat.
ararat is a MOVIE about a HISTORICAL event validated by scholars, historians, eyewitnesses from the united states, england, france, germany, russia, etc. and even turkey. there is no doubt that the armenian genocide took place. the exact circumstances, motivations, numbers murdered, etc. are questioned - true. but the fact remains that a planned genocide by the turks against the armenians took place and this movie chronicles some of the horride eyewitness stories. the one i can still see when i close my eyes is the rape scene...
now... i read the other reviews that were posted here before i went to type mine. i have to say that the reviews written against ararat were obviously politically motivated and seemingly anti-armenian. it is juvenile bickering at its best...
do you know what still hurts? the hatred.
see the movie. stop the animosity. begin the healing. enrich your knowledge of world history.
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36 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Leach HALL OF FAME on February 6, 2004
Format: DVD
The Armenian genocide constitutes one of the twentieth century's most shameful incidents. Largely forgotten today due to later, better publicized exterminations, the systematic killing of some one million Armenian people by the crumbling Ottoman Empire in 1915 still stirs controversy today. Turkey goes to great lengths to deny such an atrocity ever took place, but Armenian survivors and their descendants know better. The reasons for this event involved Ottoman politics of the time, with the rise of the reformist Young Turk movement within the Ottoman political system and its "promise" about granting autonomy to ethnic and religious minorities. In a case of "meet the new boss, same as the old boss," the Young Turks soon reneged on their promises and began a series of suppressions. Armenia suffered the most from the Young Turks sudden political reversal. Only with the defeat and dismemberment of the Ottoman Empire after World War I did the genocide end. President Woodrow Wilson redrew the boundaries of Armenia, a process that angered the Turks and directly led to the current revisionism concerning the massacre. Atom Egoyan's film "Ararat" deals directly, and indirectly, with this horrific historical event.
Thanks to an individual who really knows her stuff about film, I decided to pay a visit to Atom Egoyan. "Ararat" was my first choice, and a good one at that even though the film is often confusing--often wonderfully so--in structure. The primary reason for this concerns the numerous storylines weaving their way through the tapestry of the film.
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