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48 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thorough, well written and illustrated work.
Although a scholarly, the author has done an excellent job of thoroughly presenting the current state of the archaeology of the New Testament in a manner both the scholar and layman will find approachable and thrilling.
The author handles all significant topics of New Testament archaeology from the life of Christ to the missionary journeys of the Apostle Paul in a...
Published on August 7, 1999

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A more or less conservative interpretation of archaeology of the NT
The book is very well written and documented. More of the focus of the book deals with geography and archaelogical related discovery from the NT times and Greco-Roman times. The downside is the overemphasis on conservative reading of the Bible and maybe too much interpretation than hard facts. He clearly assumes conservative evangelical position and "here and...
Published 8 months ago by Joelice


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48 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thorough, well written and illustrated work., August 7, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Archaeology and the New Testament (Hardcover)
Although a scholarly, the author has done an excellent job of thoroughly presenting the current state of the archaeology of the New Testament in a manner both the scholar and layman will find approachable and thrilling.
The author handles all significant topics of New Testament archaeology from the life of Christ to the missionary journeys of the Apostle Paul in a systematic manner. For example, the author discusses and illustrates where Christ was templed by the devil from the pinnacle of the temple. In another example, fascinating pictures of 1st century life come alive through discussions of the dates and events that occured as Paul lived and shared the word of God with people at the various cities on his journeys. This weaving of biblical passages with the archaeological data make the book readable and sheds new light on the Bible and the historical sites.
There are detailed discussions of the city planning, civic centers, housing, commercial activities, entertainment, and the methods and difficulties of travel in the Roman world. There is a special chapter on archaeology and ancient documents.
The book is very well illustrated and includes detailed maps of most archaeological sites. There are many photographs and numerous Endnotes for further study.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great lessons for newcomers to archeology, April 15, 2001
By 
gary van (Pasadena, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Archaeology and the New Testament (Hardcover)
After reading Archeology and the Old Testament by Hoerth, this book fills out the needed holes. For a newcomer to the field of archeology this book helps to understand some of the basics. Very well put together and infromative. The development of ideas is clear and insightful. This book is a winner, and I recommend this for any student of the Bible who seeks to teach the Word of God in it's context. You will find yourself quoting from this book in your sermons!!! Gary Van Daele
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quick Review, June 12, 2000
This review is from: Archaeology and the New Testament (Hardcover)
An up to date discussion of the more important archaeological finds relevant to New Testament studies. Packed with social and cultural insights and written clearly.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A broader, more up-to-date replacement for Finegan's Archaeology of the New Testament, January 27, 2006
By 
William T. Brewer (San Antonio, TX United States) - See all my reviews
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McRay's intent for Archaeology and the New Testament is to provide a one-volume introductory book with "up-to-date archaeological site information along with important information about the overall archaeological enterprise."

The latter includes "the methodology of excavation, the nature of period cultural institutions, the contributions of archaeology to our understanding of the transmission of the New Testament text, and the primary sources that allow the reader to expand understanding of special interests." McRay is decidedly not interested in producing "an encyclopedia of archaeological sites" and has consciously chosen to omit sites that are relatively unimportant "to the task of illustrating and understanding the message of the New Testament." He does not intend to "prove" the New Testament or solve problems that arise between archaeology and the study of the New Testament. Rather, his purpose is to "provide information that will enable others to better understand and apply biblical teaching." He includes the sociological concerns of present-day archaeology but leaves the associated analyses to others. McRay's hope is to stimulate readers to "further research, reflection, and respect for the New Testament as the historical revelation of the Word of God."

According to Wheaton College sources, John McRay retired from there in July 2002 where he had taught archaeology on the graduate level for more than thirty years. (Wheaton is distinctive in being one of the few American evangelical colleges that offers a graduate program in archaeology.) During his career, McRay served as a consultant to National Geographic Magazine and as a board member of three archaeological societies. Field experience includes supervision of archaeological teams in Herodium, Sepphoris, and Caesarea, and visits to many other sites in the Middle East. McRay earned his doctorate degree from the University of Chicago.

In addition to contributing to many reference books, Professor McRay has written four books: (1) Bible Archaeology: An Exploration of the History And Culture of Early Civilizations, co-authored with Alfred J. Hoerth, published by Baker Books, 2005; (2) Paul: His Life and Teaching, Published by Baker Academic, 2003; (3) Archaeology and the New Testament, published by Baker Book House, 1991; and (4) Tomb Typology and the Tomb of Jesus (Evangelical Theological Society Papers), published by the Theological Research Exchange Network, 1988.

Archaeology and the New Testament is used as a textbook at Harvard and Oxford Universities. It serves as a broader, more up-to-date replacement for Finegan's Archaeology of the New Testament published in 1969. Academics generally consider McRay's Archaeology and the New Testament to be the New Testament counterpart to Archaeology and the Old Testament by Alfred Hoerth (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1998). The latter, however, is more of a historical survey of the Old Testament backed up with archaeological illustrations.

The apparati at the end of the book fully equip Archaeology as a resource for advanced academic work. The first is a set of five tables covering (1) archaeological periods, (2) Greek and Roman gods, (3) Nabatean kings of the New Testament period, (4) Roman emperors and other rulers, and (5) New Testament papyri from Oxyrhynchus. After the tables, McRay includes 33 pages of endnotes, a six-page glossary of technical terms, two pages of abbreviations, and a ten-page subject index.

McRay eminently succeeds in his purpose by amply illustrating his book with more than 150 photographs, many of which are his own. First-hand experience in the field coupled with the same kind of experience as a teacher give clarity and weight to his words and his many charts, diagrams, and maps. Insights are made more pointed by an expert intertwining of the New Testament narrative with the physical remains of ancient times. McRay's Archaeology and the New Testament should be a welcome resource for anyone interested in illumination of the New Testament through the science and art of archaeology.

Although McRay writes for a largely evangelical audience, he resists the impulse to play to their interests by attempting to prove the New Testament through archaeology. Nevertheless, he does go far in that direction by marshaling evidence in particular directions on contentious issues. That is, of course, in line with his stated purpose.

-- Bill Brewer
[...]
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great lessons for newcomers to archeology, April 15, 2001
By 
gary van (Pasadena, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Archaeology and the New Testament (Hardcover)
After reading Archeology and the Old Testament by Hoerth, this book fills out the needed holes. For a newcomer to the field of archeology this book helps to understand some of the basics. Very well put together and infromative. The development of ideas is clear and insightful. This book is a winner, and I recommend this for any student of the Bible who seeks to teach the Word of God in it's context. You will find yourself quoting from this book in your sermons!!! Gary Van Daele
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4.0 out of 5 stars My review of McRay's book, December 28, 2013
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This review is from: Archaeology and the New Testament (Hardcover)
You can get in this one place a collection and summary
of what archaelogists up to the time of the publication have
found that illuminates the places the New Testament events
happened. After you read it, you most likely will never say
the stories are fairy tales about fictional persons.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A more or less conservative interpretation of archaeology of the NT, November 2, 2013
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The book is very well written and documented. More of the focus of the book deals with geography and archaelogical related discovery from the NT times and Greco-Roman times. The downside is the overemphasis on conservative reading of the Bible and maybe too much interpretation than hard facts. He clearly assumes conservative evangelical position and "here and there" we see some convenient interpretation instead of the unbiased discovery. But still is very exhaustive and modern updated with the ongoing archaeological surveys in the Near East and NT.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Dissapointing, August 26, 2013
After having used Archaeology and the Old Testament for a class in university I found this text book very disappointing. While I was very impressed with the first book in this series, I found the second book to have a major flaw in that John McRay constantly backed up the opinion that the tradition locations of sites in the Syrio-Palestinian area were the correct locations because that is what people have always said, so therefore it must be true.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Book, February 24, 2010
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This review is from: Archaeology and the New Testament (Hardcover)
This is a great book. It is detailed yet concise. Its maps and charts are amazing.
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0 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great!, June 9, 2009
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This review is from: Archaeology and the New Testament (Hardcover)
Thank you very much for fast delivery, item in good condition, all went well, highly recommended seller!
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Archaeology and the New Testament
Archaeology and the New Testament by John McRay (Hardcover - January 1, 1991)
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