Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.95
  • Save: $7.19 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Architectural Photography... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book has already been well loved by someone else and that love shows. It MIGHT have highlighting, underlining, be missing a dust jacket, or SLIGHT water damage, but over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Architectural Photography: Professional Techniques for Shooting Interior and Exterior Spaces Paperback – August 18, 2009


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, August 18, 2009
$22.76
$5.99 $4.73
$22.76 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Architectural Photography: Professional Techniques for Shooting Interior and Exterior Spaces + Architectural Photography: Composition, Capture, and Digital Image Processing + Photographing Architecture: Lighting, Composition, Postproduction and Marketing Techniques
Price for all three: $77.67

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

$50 Amazon.com Gift Card
Receive up to a $50 Amazon.com Gift Card for Fine Art Purchases. Restrictions apply, see offer for details.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Amphoto Books; First Edition edition (August 18, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0817424555
  • ISBN-13: 978-0817424558
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 0.5 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #922,077 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

NORMAN MCGRATH's photographs have appeared in Architectural Digest, Architectural Record, Progressive Architecture, Domus, Interior Design, Interiors, HG, New York, Life, and Art in America. His clients include the Museum of Modern Art, the New York Philharmonic, Schlumberger, and many others.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

They are extensively captioned but there isn't very much other text.
J. Livni
I'm a professional photographer, used to be an architect, have worked on architectural shoots, etc. etc.
brad
That is the kind of technique I was looking forward to learning, but sadly this book doesn't offer much.
Abdulrahman Aljabri

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Abdulrahman Aljabri on November 3, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am an experienced portrait and landscape photographer and was starting to do interior and architecture photography. Since this book was titled "Professional Technique for Shooting Interior and Exterior Spaces" I bought it hoping to learn basics (ex leveling camera for straight lines, interior lighting, rise/fall, going with wider or narrower lenses, distributing space in the frame etc).

Sad to say I didn't learn much because this book is more organized as a collection of wonderful images with complementary text instead of the other way around. In each chapter the author starts with a bit of general text and quickly moves into showcasing pictures and explaining how they were shot. Most pictures come with plenty of details. In fact that's where I found few useful techniques, buried in the small text.

One such technique I stumbled into for example is that including more floor in the frame gives a sense of greater space in interior shots. That is the kind of technique I was looking forward to learning, but sadly this book doesn't offer much.

Overall, the book is easy to read and full of interesting pictures, but comes short on the main topic, technique. If you are looking for something about photography to read for entertainment this book might be for you. Otherwise if you aim to get a solid understanding of architectural photography consider Architectural Photography: Composition, Capture, and Digital Image Processing by Adrian Schulz.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Graham Wootton on October 14, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Norman McGrath's previous book "Photographing Buildings Inside and Out" was a classic in it's time. This new version is still a significant publication. However, it can best be summarised as "Norman's transitition to digital with a little help from his friends".

The layout is somewhat confused compared with the earlier book, with the section on equipment not coming in until page 63 and even then being mixed up with HDR and shooting for websites. However, at least he scopes the digital options and is not a diehard who still insists that professional architectural photography must be done on 5" x 4" large format. His chapters on interior and exterior photography have many useful tips for the working professional.

However, when it comes to the nitty gritty of new technology, the coverage is mostly quite thin and relies on reference to other texts for the practical detail. In some ways this is good as the last thing a book on architectural photography should be is just another photo editing software primer. However, there are a few glaring omissions. HDR is not explained in any detail, with the reader instead enthusiastically referred to another text, one that is arguably not the best or most popular on the subject. Correcting converging verticals using photo editing software is mentioned but even simple instruction on the use of the transform-perspective and free-transform tools in Photoshop is not included. The author still obviously uses strobes quite significantly in his work, despite the advent of HDR, but there is little if any real guidance in their use. Much of what he has to say is contained in the captions and text attached to separate examples of his work.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 30 people found the following review helpful By J. Livni on September 25, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having enjoyed Norman McGrath's earlier book, "Photographing Buildings Inside and Out", about two decades ago and having lived and worked in several of the buildings that appear in his images, I looked forward to his new book, "Architectural Photography - Professional Techniques for Shooting Interior and Exterior Spaces". Now that I have read it, I am somewhat disappointed. It's not a bad book, mind you, but it's not great either. While the field of Architectural Photography is exacting, detail-oriented and deliberate, his treatment here is somehow vague, apparently aimed neither at beginners nor at experienced photographers. This book is also lacking in useful updates on the changes that digital imaging has made to the field.

In his latest book, Norman McGrath presents many of his images made over the decades of his experience in the field, as well as some images by other photographers. Most images are presented fairly large, as they should be, and are well-printed. They are extensively captioned but there isn't very much other text. Thankfully, McGrath dives directly into the topic at hand and spares us irrelevant filler on the history of photography, "this is an f-stop", etc. as so many other authors do.

The Chapter Headings are:
- The Profession of Architectural Photography
- Selecting Equipment
- Interior Photography
- Photographing Outdoors
- Landscapes and Large Structures
- Challenging Situations
- Photographic Workshops and Other Sources

The author covers specific sub-topics like: Photographic Style, Shooting Tethered vs Untethered, Season, Staging an Outdoor Shoot, and Dusk: The Magic Hour, offering from as little as two paragraphs to 2-3 pages of text on each.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By emmett on November 30, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have been interested in doing photography well for about a year. I have developed a recent interest in Architectural photography, and bought the book to learn more.

I sat down on a recent Sunday evening savoring the prospect of what I would learn. I was done in about half an hour. Here is why.

The book has some nice pictures - 99% from McGrath - specifying the camera he used. The photos are well done examples of photography for print publications probably for architects - they are not creative interpretations to any significant extent. If you are interested in creative architectural photography, check out 1x.com and look under the architectural category. So the book does not pass a basic coffee table photography test of being able to capture and hold your interest on the photographs.

In terms of conveying information, the book is worse than a disappointment. I would say that it intentionally does not convey information that would be incredibly easy to convey. Take for example the discussion in the book on lens correction. McGrath says that lens correction (for wide angle distortions, and to align building lines with the photo frame) is done with "software". Thank you Norm! How hard in a 208 page book would it have been to have a paragraph that said that this can be very easily figured out and done in Photoshop CS3 or CS4 by clicking on "filter" in the nav bar, selecting "distort" on the drop down, then "lens correction", then playing with the sliders for 5 minutes ? Perhaps a screen shot of the interface ? The book is not intended to be an Adobe primer, but there are so many places where it could have with minimal effort provided encouraging, useful input to the aspiring architectural photograph. Take the High Dynamic Range technique used all over now.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again