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Arctic Thaw Hardcover – March 1, 2007

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Press the yellow dot on the cover of this book, follow the instructions within, and embark upon a magical journey. Each page instructs the reader to press the dots, shake the pages, tilt the book, and who knows what will happen next. Hardcover | More for ages 3-5

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-8–A somewhat sobering, yet upbeat examination of the probable effects of global warming on the culture of the Iñupiaq whale hunters of Alaska's North Slope. Lourie, in company with atmospheric chemist Dr. Paul Shepson and three of his students, made three journeys to investigate the problems presented by climatic change on the human and animal ecologies of this remote, challenging landscape. His lively, straightforward text describes the mixture of traditional and modern ways of the present-day Iñupiaq, as well as the work of Shepson and his team to record weather and climate changes and to predict what effect they will have locally and globally. The author also explores the efforts of BASC (Barrow Arctic Science Consortium) to assist researchers and encourage a sharing of information between scientists and native people. Numerous full-color photos and helpful maps and diagrams enrich the package. Lourie presents a serious look at the local intensities of a global problem. This book should find space on library shelves along with his other titles, such as Tierra Del Fuego (2002) and Yukon River (2003, both Boyds Mills). An up-to-the-minute window into a fast-changing world–with hopeful overtones.–Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY
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Review

"... [Lourie] introduces the reader to individuals - earth scientists and biologists, whale captains, and a man who straddles both worlds - and ends with a personal vow to change behaviors that may be contributing to global warming. Helpful backmatter includes a glossary, suggested reading, index and short list of simple things the reader can do as well to fight global climate change." --Kirkus Reviews

"On his latest geographic junket, Lourie flies in to the Barrow, Alaska region to visit scientists from the lower Forty-Eight who study possible effects of global warming and to talk with Inupiat whalers whose livelihood and folkways depend on climatic stability above the Arctic Circle. The juxtaposition of testimony from those who put their faith in scientific data and those who embody generations of experience is valuable, as are Lourie's occasional observations on groups who would actually benefit economically from a diminished ice cap...Lourie rightly suggests that negative effects of global warming will surely rebound on the Inupiat, while any positive effects (and those are speculative, at best) would benefit only narrow sections of the industrialized world. A regional map, plenty of snapshot style color photographs, an index, glossary, and list of print and Internet resources are included." --The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

On his latest geographic junket, Lourie flies in to the Barrow, Alaska region to visit scientists from the lower Forty-Eight who study possible effects of global warming and to talk with Iñupiat whalers whose livelihood and folkways depend on climatic stability above the Arctic Circle. The juxtaposition of testimony from those who put their faith in scientific data and those who embody generations of experience is valuable, as are Lourie's occasional observations on groups who would actually benefit economically from a diminished ice cap...Lourie rightly suggests that negative effects of global warming will surely rebound on the Iñupiat, while any positive effects (and those are speculative, at best) would benefit only narrow sections of the industrialized world. A regional map, plenty of snapshot style color photographs, an index, glossary, and list of print and Internet resources are included. --The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 1040L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Boyds Mills Press (March 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590784367
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590784365
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 10.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,037,097 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Peter Lourie was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and grew up in New England, Ontario, Canada, and New York City. He holds a BA in classics from New York University, an MA in English Literature from the University of Maine, and an MFA in nonfiction creative writing from Columbia University. He has taught writing for many years (Middlebury College, Columbia College, University of Vermont), and now makes his living traveling, writing and photographing. He also visits schools to share his adventures with students and teachers. He lives in Vermont where he is now working on an ongoing NSF-funded digital story-telling project about the Arctic, Arcticstories.net, and a new book for Henry Holt about Jack London and the Klondike Gold Rush.

Manatee Scientists an Oprah Best Kids' Books 2012 pick

http://peterlourie.com
http://peterlourie.com/bio/index.htm
http://arcticstories.net

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Deborah Sandford on June 7, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I beg you to read this book! It illustrates the effect of global warming on the ecology of a little known local culture (the Inupiat) who live at the Arctic edge of the world. The author brings understanding of the world's precarious future to the reader's awareness in a completely understandable way. Making three expeditions with atmospheric chemist, Dr. Paul Shepson and several graduate students, Lourie captures the essence of the Inupiat people, their livelihood, modern culture, and the effects of global warming on their way of life, as well as what global warming has in store for our earth. Color plus B&W photographs embellish this intimate story along with maps and diagrams which encourage the reader's perception of the crisis. Includes index, glossary, resource pages as well as an inspirational "What You Can do to Fight Global Climate Change."
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