Industrial-Sized Deals Books Gift Guide Books Gift Guide Shop Men's Athletic Shoes Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Adele egg_2015 All-New Amazon Fire TV Subscribe & Save Gifts Under $50 Amazon Gift Card Offer minions minions minions  Amazon Echo Starting at $84.99 Kindle Black Friday Deals Shop Now HTL

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: $2.99

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

Are You Missing the Real Estate Boom?: The Boom Will Not Bust and Why Property Values Will Continue to Climb Through the End of the Decade - And How to Profit From Them Kindle Edition

66 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
New from Used from
"Please retry"

Length: 288 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

Mark Zuckerberg's Year of Reading Book Selections
Read along with Facebook's CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

For most people, their home is their biggest investment. In 2000-2002, when stocks suffered and many businesses went under, the real estate market was a source of stability for the economy. A number of factors, including low interest rates, streamlined mortgage approval, and Internet listings, have helped to fuel the real estate boom in recent years. Although some economists believe that the real estate market may be headed for bubble territory, Lereah disagrees, arguing that continued low interest rates, a healthy boomer population, and the "boomer echo" of next-generation buyers should keep the market healthy for at least the next 10 years. But he says that in order to profit from this sector you should invest now. He offers tips on how to select a real estate agent, the ins and outs of mortgages, tax strategies, home improvements, investment properties, and vacation homes. Senior vice president and chief economist of the National Association of Realtors, he has written numerous articles on the subject. David Siegfried
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved


“An invaluable book . . . Today’s real estate markets are booming and Lereah makes a convincing case for why the real estate expansion will continue into the next decade. This book should prove to be a truly practical guide for any household looking to create wealth in real estate.” —DEWEY DAANE, FORMER GOVERNOR OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD OF GOVERNORS

“An important book, whether you agree with the author (as I do) that housing will remain an excellent investment or are convinced that home prices are poised for a plunge, David Lereah lays out a compelling vision of housing as a continuing positive investment—and how you can profit from real estate if you already own the home you live in, are looking to move from rental housing to an owner-occupied home, or want to use real estate as an investment.” —DAVID BERSON, CHIEF ECONOMIST, FANNIE MAE

Product Details

  • File Size: 2844 KB
  • Print Length: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Crown Business (February 22, 2005)
  • Publication Date: February 22, 2005
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000FCK0HG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,089,982 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

446 of 455 people found the following review helpful By NewYorkBuck on April 19, 2005
Format: Hardcover
For me, this was more comic relief than any scholarly analysis. The author has a vested interest in the bubble not bursting, and he's selling his soul with this book to prove it.

He spins webs of demographics and interest rates, but he never ever addresses the core issues that determine housing values. What is lost here is that housing in itself creates no value, its value is completely predicated upon peoples ability to pay for it. Ergo, housing prices for the last 100 years have tracked income remarkably closely, that is, except for the last five years. Historically, the ratio of housing price to annual income has been 2.1, with very little variation. In many parts of the country, this ratio is now approaching 10.5! Can you say "major correction?" Further, the amount of leverage used to buy homes during this boom has been increased to absolutely unprecidented levels. Even during the last boom of the late 80s/early 90s, the standard was still 30 yr fixed and 20% down. Not anymore. Last year, less than 15% of borrowers put down 20% or more! Further, the 30 yr fixed has been replaced by the IO, or interest only loan. See now, we have the same borrower capable of bidding 30-40% more for a propery without any better credit or ability to repay. Neat trick, but sadly, Lereah at no point addresses any of these fundamentals.

Our stock/housing pattern appears remarkably similar to the one Japan had 20 years ago. First the stock market busted. Right after, the real estate market rallied, and it busted too. The current Japanese real estate market is in a 14 year slide to date, and houses are going for roughly their 1980 value.

Keep talking Dave - we'll need the comic relief soon!
17 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
166 of 170 people found the following review helpful By Rodolfo Zanzibar on August 3, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Your Yugo Will Run Forever and How to Set the Land-Speed Record With It.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
209 of 219 people found the following review helpful By Robert M. Campbell on April 28, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Go back in time to the year 2000 when the NASDAQ was trading at 5,000. Some people said it was a bubble and couldn't go on forever. Yet the temptation to go with the flow and make was seemed to be easy money was irresistible. Driven by the marketing efforts of those who make their living in the stock market, it was argued that prices would still go higher. If you bought into their line of reasoning, surely NASDAQ 10,000 was not too far away.

I was reminded of those times when I read David Lereah's book "Are You Missing the Real Estate Boom." Even after the biggest 5-year run-up in housing prices in U.S. history - where 40% of all homebuyers must now resort to interest-only adjustable rate mortgages in order to qualify for home financing - Lereah tries to convince us that the U.S. real estate market should continue to stay healthy for the next 10 years.

His arguement goes something like this: Even though housing prices are high, the combination of low interest rates, 80 million wealthy baby boomers and their offspring ("echo boomers") will continue to fuel demand. This is not objective, unbiased advice. As head cheerleader for the Realtor hallelujah choir, Lereah is using the same tactics that have been well-honed on Wall Street: "When the ducks are quackin', feed 'em."

I don't remember what Lereah was saying about U.S. housing prices in 1998 or 1999 when prices were 30% lower than they are today (and 75% lower in many of the highly populated coastal regions), but I think its safe to say he wasn't forecasting a coming real estate boom that would last for the next 15 years.

The key to making money in real estate - and keeping it - is to get aboard a rising real estate trend early, not late.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
76 of 78 people found the following review helpful By Randy on March 31, 2006
Format: Paperback
Below is the list of liars and clueless (like David Lereah) who ruined millions with erroneous, self serving, predictions saying "all is well," "go back to sleep," at the beginning of the worst depression ever. Randy

1927-1933 Pompous Prognosticators

"There may be a recession in stock prices, but not anything in the nature of a crash."

- Irving Fisher, leading U.S. economist , New York Times, Sept. 5, 1929

"Stock prices have reached what looks like a permanently high plateau.I expect to see the stock market a good deal higher within a few months."

- Irving Fisher, Ph.D. in economics, Oct. 17, 1929

"This crash is not going to have much effect on business."

- Arthur Reynolds, Chairman of Continental Illinois Bank of Chicago, October 24, 1929

"This is the time to buy stocks. This is the time to recall the words of the late J. P. Morgan... that any man who is bearish on America will go broke. Within a few days there is likely to be a bear panic rather than a bull panic. Many of the low prices as a result of this hysterical selling are not likely to be reached again in many years."

- R. W. McNeel, market analyst, as quoted in the New York Herald Tribune, October 30, 1929

"Some pretty intelligent people are now buying stocks... Unless we are to have a panic -- which no one seriously believes, stocks have hit bottom."

- R. W. McNeal, financial analyst in October 1929

"Hysteria has now disappeared from Wall Street."

- The Times of London, November 2, 1929

Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
First post:
Prompts for sign-in