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102 of 110 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An honest story about growing up, but outstandingly humorous
Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret by Judy Blume may just be one of my all-time favorite novels. It's a hilarious story about Margaret Simon, a twelve-year-old girl, growing up in the New York area. She has to move to a new town in Farbrook, New Jersey with her parents, away from her grandmother and is trying very hard to adjust with the problems of becoming a...
Published on May 11, 1999

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty Good.
It was pretty good for the time that it was written, more for a younger reader. Probably around 12 to 13 years old.
Published 9 months ago by Redneckchild96


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102 of 110 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An honest story about growing up, but outstandingly humorous, May 11, 1999
By A Customer
Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret by Judy Blume may just be one of my all-time favorite novels. It's a hilarious story about Margaret Simon, a twelve-year-old girl, growing up in the New York area. She has to move to a new town in Farbrook, New Jersey with her parents, away from her grandmother and is trying very hard to adjust with the problems of becoming a teenager. She is faced with many typical pre-teen issues such as school, cute boys, religion, puberty and other growing up factors. She learns how to deal with boys and other "girl" problems through the process of experiment from the help of her mother, grandmother and friends. Most writers would not dare talk about puberty or issues relating to a girl's physical growth, but Judy Blume talks about these issues with a little humorous spice to it. Even though I'm not a girl and can not relate to Margaret's life, I enjoy reading this book because it talks about realistic issues and problems that made me laugh out loud. Moments like setting up a girl group to talk about cute boys, measuring their breast size, talking about their bra size and if they had their periods yet were just several mirthful moments in the book that made me laughing with tears. Not to reveal too much of the book's detail, but her mother choosing a bra for her at a nearby department store shows an aspect of her growing up, but is also comical to even read about it. This is a great book that talks about learning lessons in life and teaches anyone, especially young teens in how to handle hard choices with a funny style to it. I definitely recommend this book, especially for those young teens out there seeking a companion to relate to.
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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fave Since Age 9!, June 11, 2004
Judy Blume's writings were often deemed controversial. Oddly enough, Margaret's concerns placed this book, in the year 1970, under that label. Whether it be because of sex talk, periods, or Playboy references, this is a book that all preteens ought to read. Why? Margaret is a regular girl dealing with normal adolescent troubles. She's moved to New Jersey, she suspects, because her parents wanted to distance herself from her grandmother, who paid for Margaret's private school tuition, knit her cute little sweaters, and doted on her in a big way. Now, Maragret will go to public school. You can already see the transition to a new neighborhood won't be all too rough - she and Nancy Wheeler become fast friends and find they will be in the same sixth grade class. She, along with Nancy, Gretchen Potter and Janie Loomis, start the Four Preteen Sensations.
Blume frankly addresses puberty, as well as religion. I like the fact that Margaret feels she can talk to God without actually belonging to any particular organized religion. She is technically half Catholic and half Jewish and a pivotal part of the book is her search to find which religion is right for her. She visits a synogague and a church, yet does not feel God in either place. This exploration of faith is actually something I have seen quite a few younger kids go through today in society - it really is no different from 1970!
Margaret constantly wants her period. Why? I don't know. It will make her feel more grown-up, more womanly, I guess. Yes, I know, I know, I just answered my own question! :) Margaret also wants the body of a woman. She and her friends gossip about Laura Danker, a buxom sixth grader with a bad reputation, seemingly only because of her figure. Margaret wants breasts and goes bra shopping, only because the Four PTS girls are required to wear one as club rules - she doesn't even fill a double A. As some of the girls begin getting their periods, Margaret wonders when her time will come and we wonder if it will come during the 149 pages of the book.
Blume captures the essence of the preteen age in this long acclaimed novel. Believable characters and a believable plot, as with other books of hers, will make this one enjoyable. Margaret asks herself questions that we ask ourselves everyday. She worries about the same things we worried about at her age - maybe even now. She has similar thoughts, concerns, and feelings and does not seem at all contrived or mechanical. This way, many will be able to relate with Margaret and her story.
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42 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favorite books from my pre-teen years!!, May 16, 2001
I was reading back in one of my old diaries today--and i came across a sentence that read: you are most like the character--and there was a blank. I had written Margaret. I knew exactly where it came from. I think I read it in 4th or 5th grade and I just remember it made me feel like the author understood what we were going through--and how could she have remembered all that? i swallowed up the details and I laughed and felt bad for the character. I thought it was funny about what a big deal the periods for the girls were---and how she was struggling with religion and what she should believe. I have recommended this to some parents for their daughters but I worry that the "religion choosing" thing might bother them. I loved this book and i think every young girl should read this book. It was written 20 or 30 years ago and she still understood what i was going through!!
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret, May 29, 2000
The Book I just read tittled Are You There God? It's Me Margaret, is an excellent choice for pre-teens to read. I definately recommend this novel to young audiences. I found this novel whose author is Judy Blume to have very simple vocabulary which makes it easy for young readers to understand. Since this novel deals with pre adolesence and the questions about menstruation, one is able to identify with Margaret, the protagonist of this novel. Judy uses questions and answers which are right to the point that she wants to get accross the reader. Although there might be a certain controversial about this novel which deals about menstruating, some parents might not agree with me. I have found adolesence to be a human concern in this novel, and I will quote a part to show an example of it. "Are you there God? It's me,Margaret. I just told my mother I wanted a bra. Please help me grow God. You know where. I want to be like everyone else." Another controversy might be because of religion purposes that will conflict with some audiences reading about it, but I truly believe Judie's work is an excellent source to search a lot of unanswered questions which pre-teens are unable to find at home or are afraid to ask. Judy answers all these questions. I, myself identify with the protagonist, and I wish I would have come accross or had the knowledge about Ms. Blume's novels when I had questions about menstruataion during my pre-teens. Once again I definately recommend Judy Blume's novels to any pre-teen.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great learning tool, July 31, 2003
By 
I had to read this book for a college summer class I am taking. We are looking into young adult literature and this was the fist book we read. As an older male, I found this book to be very humurous. There are many things that happen to Margaret that remind me of my past and the awkward situations that are presented to a young adult. Some of the things that happen to Margaret and her friends are something that I never would have considered when I was a little boy their age. I would suggest that this book is read by kids ages 10-18. For people this age, it can be very imformative. It can be useful to remind kids that everyone is going through changes and that you are not alone. Younger boys should read this book to get an idea for what young girls go through. If this book is presented in the right way, it can be used as a great learning tool. Judy Blume did a great job hitting on the many problems facing young girls. Due to the situations she was put in, I empathized with Margaret and her friends.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars As Timely Today as It Was in 1970, November 17, 2006
There are a lot of things people don't tell you, and for the other stuff, they might be lying.

An only child, Margaret Simon is about to turn twelve years old, and no one has told her how stressful the next year of her life is going to be. It might not have started off so badly if her parents hadn't up and moved to New Jersey, away from her friends, school, and grandmother. Luckily, she meets Nancy Wheeler and two other girls, and they quickly form the PTS's --- Pre-Teen Sensations. Together, they talk about all things female, including boys, bras, periods, pimples, and boobs. In their Boy Books they keep track of which boy they most want to date. Their hilarious chant of "We must, we must increase our bust" is just one of the ways Margaret and friends deal with the pressure of growing up.

Through all the tough times, Margaret keeps up her conversations with God. She gets confused at times because she's able to feel God when she's alone but not when she's with other people. It doesn't matter what church she goes into --- Catholic, Presbyterian, Christian --- she can't feel him in that building. And it bothers her. The reason she's visiting so many different churches is that she feels the pressure to find God in religion and is trying to figure out what religion she's going to be.

Her honest conversations with God, combined with her various fears of growing up and not being normal, her close relationship with her grandmother, and the unique project their new teacher Miles J. Benedict assigns, make this a memorable read. For as often as people have tried to ban this book and others by this author, Judy Blume's ARE YOU THERE, GOD? IT'S ME, MARGARET. feels as timely today as it was when it was written in 1970.

Reviewed by Jonathan Stephens
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Change, August 24, 2005
By 
I went through the opposite spectrum of puberty that Margaret and the other main characters did here - everything happened too quicky for me! I never had a training bra, I went to a full blown 36C in a few months and stayed there! I never fretted over getting my period before or after the other girls, I was first in line! As a result, I went through puberty before everyone else, and they all stayed creepy little kids while I was the blossoming nymphet (once I got past that fat stage). Because of that I was ostricized. This got to show me the other side, of what it was like to be a flat chested girl child rather than a Lolita which I never experienced. I had conversations with myself like Margaret did with God, although I don't know if I ever got anywhere with those self talks. I wish I had a group of friends like Margaret did though, as it was a awkward time, to say the least; but, as I was the early bloomer I don't think the other girls knew what to make of me and therefore avoided and pushed me aside. BUT THE BOYS WERE CREEPY AND WEIRD! And you know what's funny? I run into them as adults and they're JUST AS CREEPY AND WEIRD AS THEY WERE THEN! I played those games of Spin The Bottle, 7 Minutes in Heaven and the like, and I can just imagine some of them slobbering over a woman in their 30s today like they were back then. *Shudder!*

But all that aside, this was a nice story and to this day one of the perenial young adult books that girls read. There are a lot of themes that come into play that a kid may or may not relate to - being uprooted from home to a new surrounding, making new friends, making a connection with new friends, having those debates about religious beliefs, etc. You are, after all, turning into a young adult and while a young adult may not have the same ideals and situation as a slightly or much older young adult, you start to question many rites of passage and what you have been told in the past. Some are physical (getting your ears pierced, reaching menstrual age, etc.) and others are emotional, if only it was so easy to make it all work to the best of your ability. A book like this says it's not all chemistry but something else.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Book, October 23, 2002
A Kid's Review
"Are you There God it's Me Margaret"
By: Judy Blume
Reviewed By: Orange
10/23/02
Over the summer I read a very exciting book. The book is called "Are you there God it' s me Margaret". This book is by Judy Blume. This book is about four girls that form a serect club called the four pre-teen sensations. The book is mostly about how to get through early adolescence. Not many boys read this book. In my opinion every boy should read this book. They should read it because they should know what pre-teen girls go through.
The main characters name is Margaret Simon. She is a very nice person. Yet, no matter how nice she is, she is influenced very easily. Nancy Wheeler is also an important character in this book. In my opinion she is a selfish, rude and impolite young lady. The third of the four pre-teen sensations goes by the name of Gretchen. Gretchen has a tendency of eating too much. She also goes along with everything Nancy does. The last girl's name is Janie. She is sort of like Gretchen except she doesn't eat too much, yet she is behind Nancy all the time backing her up.
I highly suggest this book to girls 10 and up. It is not a very long book but it is a very fun book to just sit down and read. If you need a good book for this summer or any time you should go grab this sensational book. When you're finished, I promise you will want to read it again.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect For Girls 10 to 13, October 8, 2005
I'm a 39 yr old mother of a 10 yr old girl who's just started asking questions about getting her period and developing. I remembered my mother giving me this book when I was 11 yrs old and how much I loved it. My daughter said it was the best book she's ever read (and she reads consantly)and it opened up discussion on these topics. It's all about little girls waiting for their periods to start, wearing bras and wondering about boys. It is so wonderfully written! My daughter has asked me to buy her more books by this author. We both highly recommend this book for your daughters.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars All About Adolesence, February 28, 2001
By 
Carmen (Saginaw, MI) - See all my reviews
Judy Blumes, Are You There God? It's Me Margaret, is a good book for any teenage girl. I would recommend this book to any pre-teen female who is experiencing the real things in life. When girls are going through adolesence many unanswered questions arise in their heads. Sometimes they are afraid to ask these questions to their parents, so they remain unanswered. Judy Blume answers a lot of these questions throughtout her book. The theme of this book is every girl goes through adolesence, so ask your questions. Margaret Simon is a typical teenage girl, who is going through adolesence. She has a very private life with God and asks him many of her questions that she has about adolesence. She has just moved from New York to New Jersey. When she moved she became good friends with her neighbor Nancy. Nancy and her friends, Janie and Gretchen had a private club. They welcome Margaret into their club, which they mainly discuss menstration, and boys. When she moved to New Jersey was when she started talking to God. Margaret's grandmother and father are both Jewish, but her mother is Catholic. This book is hard to stop reading once you start. The best part about it is that you can realte to many of Margaret's situations. Once agian, I would recommend this book to teenage girls who like to read about real situations.
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Are You There God? It's Me Margaret.
Are You There God? It's Me Margaret. by Judy Blume (Hardcover - April 1, 2001)
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