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Aristotle's Prior Analytics book I: Translated with an introduction and commentary (Clarendon Aristotle Series) 1st Edition

3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0199250417
ISBN-10: 0199250413
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About the Author


Gisela Striker is a professor of philosophy and classics at Harvard University. She received her doctoral degree in 1969 from the University of Göttingen, where she taught philosophy until 1986. She moved to the US in 1986, teaching at Columbia University in New York until 1989. In 1989 she moved to Harvard University. From 1997 t0 2000 she was Laurence Professor of Ancient Philosophy at Cambridge University (UK). In 2000, she returned to Harvard, where she now teaches ancient philosophy in both the philosophy and the classics department.
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Product Details

  • Series: Clarendon Aristotle Series
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (July 26, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199250413
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199250417
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 0.5 x 5.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,724,082 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Chris C. Hill on February 16, 2012
Format: Paperback
The Amazon review by Ole Anders of the Gisela Striker translation comprises a somewhat random group of plagiarised extracts from a professional review by the logician and philosopher John Corcoran of the University of Buffalo. Amazon has suppressed a link to Dr. Corcoran's original review, but it is easily found (in 2012) via search engine.

Particularly interesting is the first half of Dr. Corcoran's review, an expert and perspicacious overview of the current state of Prior Analytic scholarship. If later in his review Dr. Corcoran seems to take a bit too personally the volume's copyediting and indexing shortcomings, still he also presents evidence that the editorial standard for this OUP volume falls short of the high mark associated with, say, the Cambridge series of Kant translations.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael Pakaluk on January 7, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Striker's translation is lucid and accurate, and the commentary does everything that a Clarendon Aristotle commentary is supposed to do: it draws attention to the philosophical difficulties and discusses possible solutions, in such a way as to aid the reader in his or her own engagement with the text. Striker's comments are invariably astute and interesting.

Most of Corcoran's criticisms are fairly stated as against the press and its copy editor -- also, to some extent, as against Striker, who as author must sign off on the proofs -- but note that they do not pertain to any substantive philosophical or philological matter.

(When someone is asked to write a letter of recommendation for someone, and all he does is comment on the typographical mistakes in that person's writings, one draws one conclusion; but when someone is asked to write a book review and does the same, one draws an entirely different conclusion.)

His objection that Striker's commentary does not cite and engage all the secondary literature (especially, it seems, his own writings) is entirely unfair. By an editorial policy now going back half a century (as I know, since I've written one myself), Clarendon Aristotle commentaries are meant to engage the text directly and, although they should be offered as presupposing the best scholarly literature, they are not meant to review, navigate, or document that literature.

Striker does cite the secondary literature to direct the reader to fuller discussions and, in some cases, to give due credit to those who have made what Striker regards as fundamental contributions. Corcoran's work is cited three times in this way, as frequently as just about any modern commentator.
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12 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Ole Anders on December 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
This work appears in Oxford UP's Clarendon Aristotle Series "designed both for students and professionals". According to the author, the commentary is to be an aid "in reading Aristotle's treatise as a foundational text in the history of logic".

This book might be welcomed by some professionals already familiar with the field but it is not suitable for use in an undergraduate course. It has too many quirks that the teacher would want to warn against: it almost never italicizes ORGANON, it almost never capitalizes the first letter of DE INTERPRETATIONE, it is inconsistent in use of quotation marks to name expressions, and it introduces several strange hyphenations used as substantives--argument-form, class-relation, copy-editor, debating-technique, de dicto-interpretation--to name a few. There are puzzling lapses in uniformity in style: e. g., although on the title page the work translated is called Book I (not Book A), the chapters are never referred to with the Roman I: e. g., chapters 7 and 23 are called simply `A 7 and A 23', chapters 3 and 8-22 are called `chs. 3 and 8-22', chapter 45 is called `chapter 45'. A copy editor should have dealt with these things and with other matters such as incorrect punctuation and improper line-breaks. But perhaps the worst copy-editing flaw for a modern Aristotle scholar is to write `Lukasiewicz' without using the Polish el-slash. I have yet to find one proper occurrence of `Lukasiewicz' in the book.

The prose is laden with clichés. The one-page preface contains "longer than I care to remember", "more than I can possibly list here", "first and foremost", and "last and by no means least". A later sentence is devoted to thanking the "incredibly meticulous and helpful copy-editor".
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Aristotle's Prior Analytics book I: Translated with an introduction and commentary (Clarendon Aristotle Series)
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