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Arnold Bennett: A Biography Paperback – November 25, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 434 pages
  • Publisher: Faber and Faber (November 25, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571255094
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571255092
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,400,912 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Margaret Drabble, born 1939, is a novelist, critic and biographer. Her novels include The Millstone (winner of the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize), Jerusalem the Golden (winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize) and The Needle's Eye (winner of the Yorkshire Post Book Award . Her biographies of Angus Wilson and Arnold Bennett are reissued in Faber Finds. Her most recent book is a memoir, The Pattern in the Carpet: A Personal History with Jigsaws.

More About the Author

Margaret Drabble is the author of The Sea Lady, The Seven Sisters, The Peppered Moth, and The Needle's Eye, among other novels. She has written biographies of Arnold Bennett and Angus Wilson, and she is the editor of the fifth and sixth editions of The Oxford Companion to English Literature. For her contributions to contemporary English literature, she was made a Dame of the British Empire in 2008.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Emerita on November 26, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's a superb biography by a writer at the top of her game. Everything you need to know to understand Bennett.
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By Eleanor Alper on August 16, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Excellent writing about an excellent writer.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By reading man on June 26, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Forgive the dud pun in my title, but I couldn't resist.

Margaret Drabble loves Arnold Bennett and all his works--not just his major novels, like THE OLD WIVES' TALE, but everything he published, including his now antiquated "self-help" books. With a biographer like this, how can a reader expect even a modicum of objectivity about the biographee?

I admit I think it's charming that a groupie gets to write a full-dress biography, though I'm amazed the publisher thought it would sell more than a few hundred copies, which apparently was the case (my copy is clearly remaindered).

Drabble also wrote a bio of Angus Wilson, a much more important novelist than Bennett, IMHO, but the problem there is that Wilson led a much quieter, not to say duller, life than Bennett. His works, not his life, are what matter, but Drabble's is not a "critical" biography.

I admit I don't like Drabble's novels very much; they run a weak second to those of A.S. Byatt, her sister, and they're not as good as Anita Brookner's or Barbara Pym's, who write the same sort of yarn, generally speaking.

I suppose I'd say Drabble the biographer is enjoyably superfluous.
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