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Showing 1-10 of 16 reviews(4 star)show all reviews
32 of 39 people found the following review helpful
on March 3, 2007
Over a decade ago, Dr. Nuland wrote a brilliant "How We Die" in his attempt to demystify death. Now he is attempting the same goal with aging in his current book. There is the same clinical descriptions of the body along with brief biographies of those aging well. The author could have used a more forceful editor as the writing is occasionally over the top but never dull. Overall, an excellent thought-provoking read.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful
on March 29, 2007
I had greatly admired Nuland's book "How we die" so when the "Art of Aging" was released I was one of the first to purchase it. The book started out with a dramatic story of a risky encounter that 72 year old Nuland had on a subway and since I am also 72, the author had my full attention. Unfortunately, the book went downhill a bit from that point on. Some sections were very informative but others were much too wordy. I found myself wishing that Nuland's editor had taken on a more assertive role in shortening and in some cases rewriting certain passages. Overall, the book didn't quite meet my high expectations.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on August 24, 2008
Some good takeaways:
- One of the people highlighted (he seemed to fill chapters with anecdotes of various people) said that if you examine a problem long enough, you'll see your part in it.
- The best written portrayal, in my opinion, of Aubrey de Grey, who mainstream media is treating like a wise man speaking scientific truths. I take exception, though, when the author used the word "genius" once in the portrayal. I go back to what the autistic author Temple Grandin once said in an interview: "highly verbal people are illogical." This describes de Grey, a left-brained egomaniac. (When you feel a person has dazzled you with words but you come away not really knowing what they said, instead of concluding that they're brilliant, remember Grandin's words.)
- Great conclusions in the Aubrey de Grey chapter, that the world may not end from evil intentions, but from good intentions gone awry.

Wasted on me:
- His stories of doctor colleagues and friends, e.g., the narrative about Dr. Michael Debakey. I got absolutely nothing out of these portrayals, they seemed to convey no information about aging, other than giving anecdotes that seemed almost fawning over people who were just following the drives they had in younger years.
- Mrs. Chaterjee's story. I also couldn't comprehend why he wouldn't just meet with her when she was in town. Though maybe it's because I'm not a doctor, nor ever had any job like his--probably a lack understanding of his position. But it threw me, I found myself asking, "What's with all this agonizing and hiding? What kind of person is this author?" At least he was honest about his behavior. I'm open that maybe I missed the whole point of the Chaterjee story, like maybe to present the despair side of aging.

Four stars because he has a good mind, some good thoughts. But overall, I couldn't really recommend this book to a friend. Though I leave open the possibility that others might get more out of it than I did.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on March 26, 2007
I suppose all important things in life benefit from reflection, including aging. This book does a good job with erudite philosophical reflection. It uses a story-line approach to illustrate points, which most people appreciate, but which I find a bit annoying. But the price of purchase and the time invested in reading is paid back by one single chapter alone: the one on Aubrey de Grey, who is taking an engineer's approach to removing all causes of death, thereby extending mortality theoretically to infinity (seriously!) The author does not condone this, but the discussion is fascinating.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 19, 2010
My girl friend was bartending at Dr Nuland's seminar. She told me about the the seminar and the Dr's comments and his book. What she sharedd with me was so interesting, I went out and purchased the book, and so far so good. As we start to get older we really need to keep ourselves active not only mentally but physically. Travel and love life!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 19, 2009
This is an inspiring treatise on how to maximize the later years of one's life whether on the emotional, physical or intellectualy level. Sherwin Nuland is a gifted writer and is very loving and insightful. His battle against his own demons and his passionate survival makes this a remarkably insightful work.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Great book every person 40 plus read this book. I am 71 and it giges me a better perspective on how to live my future years with out fear of problems down the road. Proper Dr. check ups on a regular schedule gives me peace of mind. And drugs these days have come a long way.
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on June 26, 2015
A compendium on how to philosophize for those entering the old age. Well written, insightfull narrative of ones experiences. However, I must confess I skipped some of the autobiographic narratives.
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on April 30, 2014
Fascinating description of life after 70 with many helpful (and hopeful) suggestions for continued physical and mental growth during those golden years that we all face.
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I liked some of the book and the author was too wordy. The story of Ruby was fascinating. It helped me look at my life at the age of 70.
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