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Art in Renaissance Italy: 1350-1500 (Oxford History of Art) Paperback – May 17, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-0192842794 ISBN-10: 019284279X

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 354 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (May 17, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 019284279X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192842794
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 0.9 x 6.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #212,134 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"His discussion is marked by its scholarly breadth, clarity of argument, and willingness to include objects not within the canonic corpus....Welch's deeply informed and wide-ranging synthesis is a significant and welcome addition to the literature."--Library Journal


"This is a splendid book: well-conceived, lucidly presented, beautifully illustrated. The practical information on the production of works of art (the techniques of fresco painting and casting bronze) and on the social organization of artistic production is most welcome."--Daniel Bornstein, Texas A&M University


"An up-to-date, lucid and entirely readable synthesis of a wide range of current scholarship...should be required reading."--Nicholas Mann, Warburg Institute


"Learned and helpful...I do not know any other book which covers these topics so satisfactorily."--George Holmes, All Souls, Oxford


"A fresh and richly documented perspective on the role of images in the early Renaissance."--Martin Kemp, Trinity College, Oxford


About the Author


Evelyn Welch is Lecturer at the Warburg Institute, University of Sussex. Her publications include Art and Authority in Renaissance Milan.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Martin on January 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
Welch has a point. Much of what we focus on in our understanding of Renaissance art is rooted in our looking at "genius" and exceptional works. Her point is that we should also look at continuity and commonalities among artists of this period in what is now called "Italy." That may be her agenda as a publishing academic, but for casual readers like myself, I have to admit to being rather bored by much of the detail in this book, which focuses a lot on contracts and workshop organizations. A bit of this seems like the story of the drunk looking for his keys under a streetlight. When asked where he dropped his keys, he points over to a dark part of the street, but the light is so much better over here! Welch is so busy with her contracts (many of which are quoted at length or even in full) that she forgets to tell us what we learn from them. As with all history, we rely heavily on the documents to tell our story. But the documents are not themselves the story we wish to learn. With art, we also have the work itself, which speaks to us from across time and geography. What strikes me as most odd about this book is the lack of actual discussion of the works. The book is beautifully illustrated and is part of a series that I've come to associate with quality. Usually, these books find the exact right balance between introducing novices to the period in question AND engaging us with the current debates and compelling ideas around the work. In this case, however, we are buried in the contractual minutiae, and we never learn what these documents, and the works, mean. Perhaps Oxford could have enlisted a more engaging writer? Has Welch every hear of inference?
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14 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Inman on November 4, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I think the reader will get lost here and come away with a misapprehension about the times unless they already have a strong background in European history.

You really have to read this book critically because some parts are bizarre. I remember at one point the writer describes artists as being involved in several businesses, such as owning rental property, with the aim of providing for their retirement. While in individual cases, I am sure this was true, as a description of the role of artists in society I can't believe it is widely true in early modern society only beginning to develop a middle class. Who knows what is meant by "retirement" in an era when several generations of a family might live in the same house, and work work together in the same artists' workshop, and when average life expectancy was in the 30s and people could drop dead of blood poisoning at any time from a hangnail. That sounds like anachronism to me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D S JONES on August 18, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A marvelous guide to the period!
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful By J. Paige on February 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
Well written and researched, Ms. Welch does a very good job of giving an overall view of an important period of history - both artistic and political. Good jumping off point for more specific studies in Italian Renaissance history.
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