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The Artemis Sonnets, Etc.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 29, 2012
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Etc., indeed. Perhaps only a small word, one that makes a broad and sweeping gesture, could indicate the huge range of these splendid poems. These are poems influenced by this American author's Greek experience: her marriage to a Greek man, her immersion in Greek culture and landscape, her adoption of a Greek mother-in-law, her keeping the company of Greek deities. These are poems of shifts and changes--now the poet is a tender bear or a deer (like Artemis, she can change into animal form), now she is a girl who had pericarditis and is taking a daring swim, now she is an old woman in a Greek village; now she is in the present grieving the past, now she celebrates the things absent but never fully lost. The poems are elegant and are charged with meaning and passion. They are finely crafted: some have the dramatic turn of a good short story, some are like songs, some like visions. Often they bring significance to the ordinary: a truck driver laboring up a long hill with his heavy burden is "Sisyphus on I-26."

Here is one that contains a number of these elements:

Deer and Me

The car's skid is beginning.
You and I are the only two left on earth
moving toward each other

on the night-time country road,
your hooves on packed snow,
my rubber treads on ice.

I see your brown fur, you see me.
We are staring frozen, locked eye to eye
and I'm going to hit you, you're going to hit me--

I am the deer now, I am the hooves on the road.
You are the car, the tires, the flare of lights.
I'm going to kill you, you're going to kill me.

I'm killing and braking and sliding and skidding
inside this steamed-up glass and metal,
while Joe Crocker is singing

"You--are--so--beautiful----to me."

Some lines just take one's breath away. In "At the Wind Tower, Athens," the poet muses about the wedding ring "lost" after her divorce:

The abandoned
is always somewhere--like ashes that after the flame
are the deadweight log
liftable on a strong wind.
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on December 18, 2011
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Anne Woodworth's poetry is magical. Once again she uses poetry as a portal into her fascinating world. Artemis Sonnets may be her most ambitious and best collection of works yet. A must read. Poetry is alive and well thanks to her gift.
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