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Arthur Schwartz's Jewish Home Cooking: Yiddish Recipes Revisited Hardcover


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Arthur Schwartz's Jewish Home Cooking: Yiddish Recipes Revisited + The New York Times Jewish Cookbook: More than 825 Traditional & Contemporary Recipes from Around the World + Joan Nathan's Jewish Holiday Cookbook
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press (April 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580088988
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580088985
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 8.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #79,824 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Schwartz (Arthur Schwartz's New York City Food) breathes life into Yiddish cooking traditions now missing from most cities' main streets as well as many Jewish tables. His colorful stories are so distinctive and charming that even someone who has never heard Schwartz's radio show or seen him on TV will feel his warm personality and love for food radiating from the page. Oddly, even the shorter anecdotes often run longer than the actual recipes; anyone intending to cook from the book should have some kitchen experience or risk frustration at the often brief instructions. Dishes run the gamut from beloved appetizers like gefilte fish to classic meat and dairy main items (cholent, blintzes), plus less familiar items like onion cookies and Hungarian shlishkas (light potato dumplings). Schwartz intersperses engaging commentary on everything from farfel and matzo to Romanian steakhouses and why Jews like Chinese food. Those with Westernized palates may recoil at the thought of gelled calf's feet, but Schwartz shows how stereotypically heavy Ashkenazi food can be improved and made at least somewhat lighter when prepared properly. Cooks and readers from Schwartz's generation and earlier, who know firsthand what he's talking about, will appreciate this delightful new book for the world it evokes as much as for the recipes. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Although the first Jewish immigrants to New York were Sephardic Jews from Spain, they were doomed to be overwhelmed by waves of Ashkenazi Jews fleeing Eastern European pogroms. So many Jews took refuge in New York City that the metropolitan area became the world’s center of Jewish cooking, at least till the founding of Israel. Schwartz covers the basics of this influential cuisine, from schmaltz (rendered chicken fat) and dill pickles through brisket and cholent (Sabbath stew). The remarkable intersection in America of Jewish and Chinese cultures finds celebration in a recipe for chow mein. Passover dishes, which must follow strict injunctions, earn their own chapter. Photographs, not just of food but also of New York’s people and restaurants, and diverting sidebars contribute further vibrancy to the text. A glossary of Yiddish food words enhances the book’s reference value. Schwartz’s well-earned reputation as a Jewish cookery maven will increase demand for this title. --Mark Knoblauch

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Customer Reviews

The recipes are easy to follow and taste great.
Lisa B. Weinstein
I also loved reading the background stories and the historical tidbits that were thrown in--this is what makes the book exceptional, besides the delicious recipes.
Me
Enjoy - if you want to know what real eating is like.
Asa R. Talbot

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Larry Mark MyJewishBooksDotCom on March 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The fact that the author is the foodmaven.com comes across clearly, since he adds so much rich information on Jewish food history with each recipe. It is a pleasure to read. And then there are the photos. As he writes in the intro, food is a connection to the Jewish past and our faith. Sure, more Jews eat pizza than chopped liver, more eat sushi and salad nicoise than chopped herring and gefilte fish, but those classic foods are in our Jungian collective unconscious. And now for the recipes.

Appetizers (Forshpeiz) include recipes for arbes, chopped eggs and onions, chopped herring salad, schmaltz, black radish (ritach, as in ritach mit tzibeleh), vegetarian chopped liver (2 recipes), romanian eggplant salad, 2nd Avenue Deli's health salad/slaw, pitcha, chrain, and gefilte fish (mit carrots).

Some SOUPS are Chicken w/ knaidlach, kreplach, mushroom barley (did u know that mushrooms were free and plentiful in the woods of Lithuania), borscht (3 kinds), and Schav. Some SIDES include three, count 'em, 3 kugels, latkes, shlishkas, kishkas, dermas, tzimmes, and cabbage and noodles (u know.. that mouse in rataouille should have made cabbage and noodles for the critic) (hint... salt the cabbage first)

Some MEATS are cholent, flanken, brisket, stuffed cabbage, potted meatballs, (a history of romanian steakhouses; an essay on why Jews like chinese), karnatzlach (little sausage), salami and eggs, chow mein, and pepper steak. Not to mix meat and milk in the same paragraph, but some DAIRY recipes included are: Ratner's brown gravy, blintzes, lox fliegles, pickled lox; lox,eggs & onions; and whitefish salad.

There is a whole chapter for passover dishes, including an apple cake and matzo buttercrunch and ingberlach (matzo farfal ginger candy).
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Marion Rollings on March 19, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Arthur Schwartz has once again written an outstanding collection of recipes that are far more then just great recipes--this book, like his Naples at Table (also highly recommended) and his others, is a history of the food of a people--historically accurate, informative, and great cooking--he really teaches you how to cook, why to cook it the way he does, and how to enjoy it best. His personable manner, writing talent, and enthusiasm make this a great book to cook from, learn from, and enjoy! Buy a copy for yourself and one for a friend--it will make a terrific gift.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Sidney Mark on April 8, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
From the moment I received this cookbook, it started to bring back memories of the 50's and 60's when families spent the holiday's together. All the recipes were from a different time, foods that you don't get today. A lot of the recipes were buried with my grandmother and aunts. I found them again in this book, same recipes, just modernized a little.
Looking at them I pictured the recipes being prepared by my grandmother, mother and aunts. I can smell the delicious aromas and almost taste the foods.
Anyone looking to bring back their memories of growing up should purchase this book.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Martin on May 5, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Arthur takes us on a trip down memory lane-- the food of our bubbies, brought with them from the "Old
Country," some adapted to, or created for Jewish life of the new country. Arthur has updated the recipes, so that they can be enjoyed without guilt. Potato pancakes, noodle kugel, Roumanian carnzelach (meat "sausages")
--and more.

His delightful commentary--he is a very knowledgeable guy--makes the book a great read, and his careful testing of every recipe makes him one of the most trustworthy food writers around. There are plenty of cookbooks about the food of the Ashkenazic Jews--but this book is unique. A wonderful companion to Arthur's superb "New York Food."
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By B. KAY on October 20, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Great recipes for all the famous Jewish classics and many of the not so famous ones.
The paprika chicken recipe is great as is the kuggel one (although I prefer mine richer). I made the caramelized cabbage with noodles, a dish I'd never heard of but now consider a great addition to my family's side dishes. The chicken soup recipe was also good.

There were also great illustrations of Jewish food and Jewish cooks to illustrate and lend the book a festive air. I haven't tried any of the sweet dishes but come the next round of holidays I expect to.

Finally, the book contains fascinating text about Jewish culinary history. I learned a lot about where Jewish food developed, what created the classic Jewish flavor combinations, and provided insight into a mostly gone era of Jewish dairy restaurants, Romanian steakhouses, bialy bakeries and other varieties of Jewish restaurants beyond the bagelries and delicatessens.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Florence Schemer on May 29, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Excellent book. I made the brisket in the book and it was wonderful. I also made the Apple Cake and it was the best. I would consider giving this book to brides.
FS
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ronna Sussman on September 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I am sending this book as a gift to my friends. Most of the recipes I know from my heritage, but it wasn't the recipes that made me enjoy this book it was his introductions to each. A must buy for the generation whose parents were born here!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Abraham L. Friedman on September 28, 2008
Format: Hardcover
My husband and I love this cookbook. It brings back a lot of memorys for my husband and we have tried many of the recipes. They are all good.

The stories are so similar to our own lives. It really is a joy to read.
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