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100 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars With this book, it'll be hard to NOT make pizza!
According to the authors of this cook book, the "secret" to creating "quick" and great-tasting pizza and flatbreads is simply this: Mix up lots of dough at one time and store in the frig--you'll gather and mix simple ingredients one time, then over the course of a week or two, you will take just a few minutes to drag the dough container out of the frig, separate a piece...
Published on September 22, 2011 by I Do the Speed Limit

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70 of 77 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Concept, Good Pizza
This book is not as life changing as the original Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking. If you have that book, you probably already understand how you can apply the concepts to flatbread. I've used a modified version of their original bread recipe to make pizza for years (they do have a pizza recipe in that book). If you...
Published on November 10, 2011 by AmandaGal


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous, May 10, 2013
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Love all of their books. If you think you can not bake bread get their books. You will feel like a bread baking rock star! They present a technique that uses a wet dough. You toss the ingredients in a container, stir them well, put the lid on, and after a short rise, put it in the fridge to use throughout the week. About as fail proof as bread can be.

Hint: try the cloche or dutch oven method. Use any heat proof dutch oven...heat it in the oven when pre heating, place your loaf in the pot, put the lid on for the first ten minutes and then remove the lid to finish baking. I bake to about a 204 degree internal temp. I use an instant read thermometer probe to check the temp. Perfect every single time.

I use a scale and use metric. I literally line a bowl with a freezer bag and start tossing ingredients in it on the scale. I stir it well, let it rise, zip it up, and toss in the fridge for another day. No bowl to wash. I always use parchment when forming and place the whole thing, parchment and all, into the dutch oven.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A nice addition to "Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day," but not as versatile, March 17, 2012
This review is from: Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day (Hardcover)
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When Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking first came out, it revolutionized my bread baking. Before, I would use my Cuisinart bread machine once or twice a month, but with "Artisan Bread in 5," I would bake at least once a week using the book's no-knead method to produce brioche, challah, and caramel pecan rolls that rivaled those from my local bakery. When the sequel Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day: 100 New Recipes Featuring Whole Grains, Fruits, Vegetables, and Gluten-Free Ingredients came out, I found fewer recipes that appealed to me; most of the "whole-grain" recipes still called for large amounts of refined white flour and added wheat gluten.

So when I saw "Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day," I was willing to give it a shot. Normally, I'll just purchase frozen pizza dough, so I was looking forward to making my own using the same method I'd had success with for breads and rolls. Be forewarned: the book is primarily a pizza dough book, with numerous variations on the master dough recipe ("00" flour, which is what is used in Italy for pizza and pasta), semolina, whole wheat, spelt, cornmeal olive oil) and various international breads like naan (there was a naan recipe in the first "Artisan Bread in 5," but this one includes the tenderizing addition of yogurt), chapati, homemade tortillas (corn and flour), and injera.

The pizza sauces are more of an afterthought to the dough; the basic "tomato topping" consists of "four 14.5-ounce or two 28-ounce cans crushed or diced tomatoes: the world's simplest pizza topping." The homemade barbecue sauce is a winner, though, with its complex flavor profile of orange juice, dark brown sugar, chili powder and paprika in addition to tomatoes, onion, ketchup and vinegar. You'll also find recipes for pesto, bechamel, and tomatillo sauce. The pizza recipes themselves include some interesting combinations like curried sweet potato, lentil and arugula, Brussels sprouts, smoked pancetta and pecorino, and rainbow beet pizza. Instructions for cooking pizza on an outdoor grill are also included. The cheesy breadsticks are easy to throw together and are far superior to most chain restaurants' breadsticks.

In addition to the pizzas and flatbreads, there's also a nice assortment of easy-to-make Mediterranean dips, including hummus (their version uses 1/2 cup tahini, which results in a silky-smooth texture), baba ghanoush, the underappreciated ajvar (a Croatian spread made from roasted red peppers), the Greek dips tzatziki and skordalia, Italian caponata, and French tapenade, that are perfect to whip together for an informal get-together. There are a few substantial soups with international flair, including curried lentil soup, Cuban black bean soup, Scandinavian fish soup, and Spanish Galician Potato Soup with Greens and Chorizo. The desserts are kind of an afterthought and definitely one of the weaker points of the book.

Like most good baking books, ingredients are measured by volume (U.S.) and U.S. and metric weights. For baking, weighing is more accurate than volume, since flour can absorb moisture (and thus become denser), altering the amount of flour on a dry vs. humid day. My advance reader copy has relatively few black-and-white photos, so I can't comment on the final printing, but what step-by-step photos are provided are helpful.

Bottom line: if you're new to the 5-minute, no-knead method (this is NOT the same one as My Bread: The Revolutionary No-Work, No-Knead Method or Kneadlessly Simple: Fabulous, Fuss-Free, No-Knead Breads, as you're not baking the bread at very high heat inside a Dutch oven), I recommend picking up Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Discovery That Revolutionizes Home Baking first, as it's simply more versatile than "Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day." If you're looking specifically for practical pizza dough recipes, then this is the book for you!

P.S.: It's well worth the investment to purchase a baking stone, pizza peel and Cambro RFS6PPSW2190 6-Quart Round Food-Storage Container with Lid, Set of 2 to help you get started. Good luck!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So much more than just pizza recipes!, September 19, 2011
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This review is from: Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day (Hardcover)
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I have both of the previous books "Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day" and "Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day" and have used them frequently and loved everything that I have made. This llatest book "Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day" did not disappoint and is just as fantastic as the previous two!

First off, this is so much more than a recipe book for pizza...it has recipes for corn tortillas, naan, crackers, brioches, pita, dips, soups, and even desserts. Secondly, I love the ethnic feel of this book with it's tons of vegetarian selections (don't worry plenty of meat recipes too) as well as recipes for whole grain, gluten-free, and yeast-free doughs. It even has a section on breakfast pizzas too! Of course it covers all of the pizza making basics from the proper equipment to selecting ingrediants, as well as detailed steps on how to make the doughs.

A few of the recipes I can't wait to try are p.177 "Leek, Herbes de Provence, & Garlic Focaccia", p.184 "Spinach & Ricotta Piz-zone", and p. 271 "Skillet Apple Pie". There are also many traditional and not so traditional pizza recipes, which could be used with store bought dough or dough made in your bread machine. Will be gifting this book often!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fun book but ipad version a little difficult to navigate, October 21, 2013
This is the perfect easy cook book for thoes of us who have only a little time and pizza hungry children at home. The dough is low maintance and easy to make in about 10 minutes and is ready for a quick dinner by the next day. It is a little on the thick side if you prefer thin crust pizza but I have only made the basic dough twice so maybe with time I will be able to stretch it out more. . . It was a little too moist the first time and needed more flour to make it workable. . . I think I will be able to work out my kinks with a few more goes. I like the olive oil dough best so far. You do need to get a good sized plastic container with lid for the fridge and one day I would like to get a stone but even without the pizza is quite tasty.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book for pizza making, September 30, 2011
This review is from: Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day (Hardcover)
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I have the Artisan Bread in 5 min book and love it so I was excited to get this follow up book. I couldn't be more pleased. My daughter and I read through the book and then made our first batch of dough. We just used the Master Mix (nothing fancy). Super easy to do (we used the stand mixer) and 3 hours later, we were making pizza. We made 4 pizzas and both kids said it was the "best pizza ever". This from kids who don't normally eat the crust edge. It was all gone! I used cornmeal on my pizza peals and preheated my Pampered Chef pizza stones in my convection over about 30 min beforehand and the results were perfect. I loved the tip about italian sausage: you don't have to pre-cook the sausage! That totally saves a step (and mess on the stove). Just portion it over the pizza and it fully cooks in the oven while cooking the pizza. We used italian sausage and turkey pepperoni and plan on making more this weekend. If you like pizza and want great results (and save money because delivery is getting pricey), try this book
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Slightly Different Approach to Making Flatbreads and Pizzas, February 2, 2014
This review is from: Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day (Hardcover)
I have made breads for my family for over 20 years and I am always looking for better recipes, methods and techniques for making better loaves of bread. I found a copy of Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day and decided to give it a try.

The basic premise of the book is very simple and straightforward - make the dough in larger quantities, let it rise once and then put it in the refrigerator for later use. This method has some interesting results. It’s a variation of the slow rise method of making bread dough, which has proven (at least in my kitchen) to result in stronger flavored end results with appreciably less work. The authors say to let the dough stay in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. The longer it sits in the refrigerator, the more intense the flavor becomes as the yeast breaks down the sugars in the flour. It also means having fresh bread available more frequently, and there’s nothing bad about that!

I was a bit surprised when the authors stated that their recipes are geared for the “scoop and level” method of measuring (scoop the flour with a cup measure and level it off) instead of spooning the flour. However, the dough formulas themselves are presented with weight measures in addition to volume so working with a kitchen scale allows for consistent results.

Many recipes in this book rely on master formulas that the authors have assembled. This works out well, particularly due to the methodology behind the dough-making process.

The resulting breads turn out nicely. The flavors are stronger than most typical same-day breads as a result of the stay in the refrigerator. The texture is also very good - I have found that the breads tend to have a good, chewy crust and are light and airy (at least with the recipes I have tried).

Artisan Pizza and Flatbreads in Five Minutes a Day is a good book on making flatbreads and pizza. The method presented is very straightforward and simple and results in good breads. If you want fruesh breads and don’t want a huge investment in time, this is a title at which to take a closer look.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful pizza on the first try, January 18, 2012
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This review is from: Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day (Hardcover)
I've had many types of pizza in my life, but I've never known anything about the different styles, so I didn't know what to expect when I followed the instructions for a Naples-style Margherita pizza. I opened the oven after eight minutes, and I was impressed to see a beautiful, perfectly browned pizza. The book gets five stars just for that experience.

I love the authors' approach. They focus on the why, not just what. They include many time-saving tips, including a stove-top pizza that I'm going to try this week. I'm also impressed by all of the variations, including the many non-pizza flatbreads. I was also amazed to see a recipe for ajvar, a pepper and eggplant "salsa" that I love from my time in Serbia but haven't had for years.

I love the book, but it isn't perfect. A few complaints:

1) Some recipes inexplicably leave off the weights for low-volume ingredients like salt and sugar. I have a high-quality digital scale (accurate to the gram), and I have no desire to use measuring spoons. It will only take me 30 minutes to write them in, but why should I have to do it?

2) Although there are a number of non-Neapolitan pizzas, they really only discuss technique in-depth for the one style. I would like to see a more in-depth discussion of technique for the other styles of pizza.

3) There are great recipes for different (and nicely unique) doughs, such as a masa harina dough, a rye dough, etc. However, these would be more useful if the dough recipes referred to specific topping combinations that they go well with. It wouldn't be that hard to give the page numbers of later topping recipes.

4) As others have noted, there isn't much discussion of tomato sauces. Some of the topping combinations lean towards the pretentious, but at least they're interesting.

5) There aren't very many whole-grain recipes, and there isn't much explanation for how whole grains affect the result. Given the otherwise careful attention to what ingredients do (e.g., the effects of high-protein and low-protein flours), it seems like an unfortuante oversight.

One recommendation (not really a complaint): if you don't like buying single-purpose tools, use a potato masher to mix dough. If you already have one, there's no point in buying a dough whisk. It's basically the same thing.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day, November 28, 2011
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This review is from: Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day (Hardcover)
I have the other two bread books and have been waiting for the pizza book and it was not a disappointment. Absolutely love the authentic taste and texture of this pizza crust. It goes against everything I learned in pizza crust making, but it works. It is handy as well to have this in the fridge and ready for use on those nights when you forgot to get anything out of the freezer for dinner or didn't have time to shop.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Convenient and Fun Pizza Recipes, October 20, 2011
This review is from: Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day (Hardcover)
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Having had great fun and success with "Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day," I decided to order the pizza and flatbread book and try the recipes.

Once again I think that the authors have done an outstanding job at providing a low-hassle and fun way to add pizzas to the weekly menu. My book arrived just in time to take advantage of the end of tomato, basil, eggplant and onion season, which made for some creative and delicious pizzas. For our household I like to make half recipes of the dough so that we have enough on hand to make a few pizzas, but not so much that the storage bowl takes up too much refrigerator space.

One caveat: It can be a challenge to make successive pizzas because it's important to heat the oven to its maximum baking temperature to get a crisp crust during the shot baking period, and since I use corn meal to help slide the pizza into the oven, there tends to be a bit of smoke, making it inconvenient to bake a second pizza...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 8 Chocolate Pizzas?, October 9, 2011
This review is from: Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day (Hardcover)
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I was delighted to receive a copy of Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day, the latest from Jeff Hertzberg and Zoë François. Pizza is something that I've been making for many years, simply from self-defense. Did you ever buy pizza for a half-dozen teenagers? These days I live alone, but I still make pizza at least once a week, pitas every couple of weeks and always have a ball of dough or two in the freezer.

Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day has a great selection of recipes both for various doughs and toppings/sauces for your finished product, though I found the addition of a couple of soups odd. Soup seems to me to be out of place in this particular collection. I've made several of the recipes - notably the Corn Masa Dough, which I turned into a Tex-Mex style chicken enchilada pizza using a homemade cooked tomatillo salsa verde as the sauce, topped with cooked chicken, black olives, and cheddar cheese. It was wonderful, though frankly the crust was no better than the recipe I've used for the last couple of decades. I've used a chunk of it up as another pizza and made a batch of bread sticks, but ended up simply throwing away the rest of the dough as my freezer space is at a premium.

I love the sounds of some of these recipes. Who wouldn't adore a chocolate pizza slathered in pastry cream and then covered with fruit? I do have one huge reservation about most of them though. A 12-inch pizza is not a small pizza - it will easily serve two, 4-6 as a dessert - and each of Hertzberg & François' recipes makes enough dough for eight pizzas that size. That would be a perfect amount for enough pizza for a party, but how often would you have to serve that chocolate crusted dessert pizza to use up all of that dough? True, you can freeze the dough (for use within a couple of weeks) but I'm not at all sure that even dragging things out over three weeks or a month would provide enough opportunity to eat up 8 chocolate dessert pizzas without becoming heartily sick of it - even in the days when I was feeding 6 teens, all with hollow legs. I used just 1/3 of the ingredients specified for the chocolate dough and still had dough for the freezer and more pizza than I could eat in a sitting.

All in all, the ideas were good, but I wished that Hertzberg & François had simply given normal recipes for most things that made only a pizza or two rather than trying to extend the "always in the refrigerator" 5 Minutes A Day concept to pizza.

Recommended, but with reservations.
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Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day
Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in Five Minutes a Day by Zoe Francois (Hardcover - October 25, 2011)
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