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Putas Asesinas (Naturaleza E Historia) (Spanish Edition) (Spanish) Paperback – September 15, 2003


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Paperback, September 15, 2003
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Product Details

  • Series: Naturaleza E Historia (Book 314)
  • Paperback: 225 pages
  • Publisher: Anagrama (September 15, 2003)
  • Language: Spanish
  • ISBN-10: 8433924850
  • ISBN-13: 978-8433924858
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5.6 x 8.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,399,683 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Roberto Bolano (Chile, 1953-2003). Uno de los escritores latinoamericanos imprescindibles de nuestro tiempo. Premio Herralde de Novela. Premio Municipal Santiago de Chile. Premio Romulo Gallegos. Premio Ciudad de Barcelona. Premio Salambo. Premio Fundacion Lara. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Author of 2666 and many other acclaimed works, Roberto Bolaño (1953-2003) was born in Santiago, Chile, and later lived in Mexico, Paris, and Spain. He has been acclaimed "by far the most exciting writer to come from south of the Rio Grande in a long time" (Ilan Stavans, The Los Angeles Times)," and as "the real thing and the rarest" (Susan Sontag). Among his many prizes are the extremely prestigious Herralde de Novela Award and the Premio Rómulo Gallegos. He was widely considered to be the greatest Latin American writer of his generation. He wrote nine novels, two story collections, and five books of poetry, before dying in July 2003 at the age of 50. Chris Andrews has won the TLS Valle Inclán Prize and the PEN Translation Prize for his Bolaño translations.

Customer Reviews

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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Antonio Gonzalez on July 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
This collection of 13 stories by Roberto Bolano is misleadingly titled and I presume because of its offensive title most would think this is a pornographic book. The book's cover doesn't help much either.

You will be surprised then, when the book turns out to be a delightful collection of interesting, humorous stories, likely to become a classic of Spanish fiction.

The "x-rated" title is taken from one of the stories in this collection, a beautiful, lyric, impressionist tale.(No, prurience there.) He also tells stories about failed and successful artists, vacationing filial couples, with a strong taste for iguana meat (You will have to figure that one yourselves), a woman who teaches in a rural governmental poetry school and satisfies her artistic needs listening to a Mexican Rancheras radio station. (If you wonder what these type of music is, think of a mariachi singing solo, heart-crushing songs in loud tenor (alto)voice--(not poetic--not much.). And he writes of displaced Chileans with personal and ingenious political ideologies, one of which suffers from "bibliographic dementia" and confuses Marx with Che Guevara,also of a self-anointed politician who radiates moonlight, and of "Buba" the magnificent, enchanted African soccer player, and more. I would be remiss if I didn't tell about a story which gives 69 reasons not to dance with Pablo Neruda (Chilean Nobel Laureate poet).

Hope you will agree, this is a classic creation. Enjoy!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Roberto J Porta on April 2, 2009
Format: Paperback
Después de leer "Nocturno de Chile" y las críticas excelentes sobre "Detectives Salvajes", me decepcioné un poco con "Putas Asesinas". Podría decir que de los trece cuentos, cinco me impresionaron, seis me gustaron a medias y dos me aburrieron. Empero, no hay duda que Bolano es un buen escritor, digno de nuestro respeto y admiración. Quizás su punto fuerte sean las novelas y no las historias cortas.
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By Oliveira on July 7, 2013
Format: Paperback
Some critics have objected that Bolaño's short stories are among the worst texts of his oeuvre. It is true that some of them are not among his best. Which doesn't mean that others belong to that rare category of the masterpiece.

Particularly in this collection, we see Bolaño's masterful skills as a short fiction writer. In "Últimos atardeceres en la tierra," a story that could be put in the tradition of Borges' "El sur," a father and a son travel to Acapulco and the trip becomes a descent into hell. What does this mean? It means that, just like Dahlmann's trip into the immense Argentine pampas, the pampas plagued by violent gauchos and "cuchilleros," the father and the son descend into a world of vagabonds, tramps and knife-fighters (notice the direct reference and re-writing of Borges' tale.)

In another story that I find particularly appealing, "Buba," Bolaño sets out to write/rewrite in the recent tradition of soccer fiction. (It is no coincidence that the story is dedicated to the great Mexican writer Juan Villoro.) What Bolaño narrates in this story is something similar to what he narrated in Los detectives salvajes: the universe of the Latin American youth (here, two soccer players; in The Savage Detectives, two poets) that is completely lost in the European continent and in the entire world. A youth that has lost its direction and its balance. A balance that could only be restored by recurring to the original values: in this case, a Brazilian magician/witch.

Back to the beginning. Bolaño's stories are so important within his oeuvre because they play with the Spanish American literary tradition with just the same mastery (and playfulness) as do his most ambitious novels. This is why they should be read as yet another testament of Roberto Bolaño's literary greatness.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Herman Mares Sr. on May 3, 2009
Format: Paperback
I had read many professional reviews regards this author and his works and nearly all have been favorable. I was not disappointed.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Juan M. Rodriguez on August 9, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book not realizing it was a collection of short stories. I enjoy reading books in my native language usually. I don't enjoy reading deep undecipherable prose. Mr Bolaño is a revered and respected author, however this book in particular was a mystery. It was about unrequited love and deep emotions. Too deep for me to contemplate.
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