Ashes & Fire

October 11, 2011 | Format: MP3

$9.49
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4:19
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3:45
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4:50
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2:58
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3:53
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2:23
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4:44
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4:18
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4:30
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2:52
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11
4:10

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 11, 2011
  • Release Date: October 11, 2011
  • Label: Capitol Records
  • Copyright: (C) 2011 PaxAmericana Recording Company Under Exclusive License to Capitol Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 42:42
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B005NPBTQ6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,865 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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See all 79 customer reviews
Lucky Now is easily one of the best 10 songs he's ever written!
D. Stanmyer
The best recommendation I can give is that I keep coming back to this album and listening..., again and again.
Mickley
Yes, it is a departure, but an equal, or as good as, departure from previous albums.
R. Miller

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Storylover TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 11, 2011
Format: Audio CD
I love Ryan Adams, and you need to know that up front. That said, I've been a little let down by Easy Tiger, which I loved at first, but which has not stayed in my CD player as much as say Cold Roses (probably his masterpiece!) or the somewhat misunderstood genius of 29. I was worried that this CD could be a return to more Easy Tiger style stuff, which was good but not very memorable. I am so pleased to be wrong. Dirty Rain, the first track, starts us off on an easy midtempo folky song with a great melody and a fantastic vocal, full of the passion and grit that we've missed a little recently. You've probably heard Ashes & Fire by now if you are a Ryan Adams fan, and it is a good one. I haven't heard him use the waltz beat very much, and he uses it well. The vocal on "Kindness" is absolutely transcendent, it reminds me of the best vocals from Cold Roses, and the use of the organ subtly in the background is very welcome. I love the piano touches, which are not overboard, and I love his gentle drawl. I love this song, and for me it is probably the standout of the record. Fans of alt-country Ryan (as opposed to Rock N Roll Ryan, Heavy Prog Metal Ryan, English 80's Pop Ryan, Rap Ryan, Death Metal Ryan, or any of the other incarnations that he inhabits with remarkable facility) will find much to enjoy. For me, his voice--by turns gentle, trembling, cracked, gritty, and melodic sounds fantastic here. Ryan does a lot of styles well, but this is the style at which he is the acknowledged master, and this set of music will make those who love his heartbroken tales of woe and love gone wrong very very pleased that they have continued to listen.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Not Mozart on October 18, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
First of all, I find that people really don't seem to understand Ryan Adams. Since "Gold" he has released pretty sonically-thematic albums, he tends to save the acoustic songs for an album, the rockers for another, etc. He's such a prolific songwriter, I can't say I disagree with his method. I'll bet he has a big electric album coming soon also for all of you who want that side of him. I've also heard that this quieter album and his subsequent solo acoustic tour have to do with his current hearing problems from playing with Whiskeytown and the Cardinals electric for all these years. That said, I find the melodies to be strong and reminiscent of the Gram Parsons reference he's been trying to shake for all these years with his different adopted personae but has outlived. I think Glyn Johns definitely brings a decidedly classic-rock, California country-rock vibe to this album with his production. It reminds me of Neil Young's "After the Goldrush" quite a bit actually. "Dirty Rain", the title track and "Do I Wait" are definitely standouts but I also found myself drawn to the more laid-back "Rocks", "Save Me", "Kindness" and "Lucky Now". A very, very solid albeit laid-back record. I actually think a big loud rocker would have ruined this record for me, I'm sure he has those to come and I love that side of him also, but not on this album. I'm perfectly happy with a laid-back record with good melodies and the acoustic vibe.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By B. Stewart on October 20, 2011
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
This is an album that I have waited for....the songs are not from his wild rock n roll side but instead from his mellower and deeper side of him. Each song is perfectly written and performed. If you love his songs like Damn Sam, La Cienega Just Smiled, Come Pick Me Up, you won't be disappointed. He really is Brilliant! This is the side of Ryan that first made me notice him. Of course, he's a natural as a rock and roller and he is at the top on my list, but this more mellow side is what I love about his music.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Gregory William Locke on October 31, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Now a sober man with a Hollywood wife, a Hollywood house and his own record label, Pax Am, Ryan Adams has released the first record of his second act, a mellow and warm singer/songwriter effort called Ashes & Fire. The two things you're bound to hear about this record - if you're the investigative type - is that: 1) The record is quite mellow and fells like something of a brother to Neil Young's Harvest and After the Goldrush; and 2) Adams has become, maybe above all else, an incredible vocalist.

In a 2001 interview, following the release of his make-or-break sophomore solo release, Gold, Adams spoke about his then-strict routine, where he forced himself to spend an hour each day working on songwriting, an hour each day practicing guitar and an hour or more each day singing. It was no surprise then that, following Gold, Adams became one of the most prolific - and consistent - songwriters of his generation, releasing 12 albums between his breakthrough release, 1997's Stranger's Almanac, and today's Ashes & Fire. All along it's been said that Adams was a heavy user, living out the mission set forth in his 2001 song "Firecracker," where he sand "Everyone wants to go forever / I just want to burn up hard and bright." Clearly, things have changed, and Ashes & Fire is the document.

What first took my attention was the look of the record. Adams, also a painter and novelist, had never struck me as a man with an overall aesthetic like, say, Thom Yorke or Jack White. That is, not one to speak too highly of. Mostly, Adams - for me that is - was a lousy painter and poet who could make great, great songs that sometimes had very good lyrics.
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