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Ashes of Victory (Honor Harrington #9) Hardcover – March 1, 2000


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Frequently Bought Together

Ashes of Victory (Honor Harrington #9) + Echoes of Honor (Honor Harrington # 8) + In Enemy Hands (Honor Harrington, Book 7)
Price for all three: $60.45

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Baen; First Edition edition (March 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671578545
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671578541
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (227 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #547,908 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

"Why in Christ's name can the woman never bring a ship back intact?" muses Hamish Alexander at the triumphant return of Honor Harrington in Ashes of Victory, the apparent resurrection of a woman he'd seen executed by the Peeps some two years earlier. Yep, she's back: minus a left arm and an eye, minus a few inches of hair, and more than a little banged up in the process, the indestructible, ever-resilient Honor is back from the dead--and she's got some 400,000 liberated POWs from Hades in tow for good measure.

Picking up where Echoes of Honor left off, the ecstatic reunion that begins Ashes proves short-lived as Honor once again lives up to her nickname of "The Salamander," always ending up where the fire's hottest. In the longest book of this naval space-opera series, David Weber plunges his beloved heroine (now an admiral!) into a thick tangle of political plots, as she takes on a more mature, behind-the-scenes role than in previous books. But don't fret: there's still some good action as HH prevents an assassination attempt and Manticore and its allies test-drive their new weaponry. And quite a few characters get what's coming to them too, including a few who drop like picked-off Peeps. All in all, yet another worthy installment in the series--check out On Basilisk Station first if you're new to HH. --Paul Hughes

From Booklist

The new Honor Harrington novel is the longest yet, but justifies its length and complexity by greatly advancing the story of Honor and her universe. Honor has triumphally returned from Hades, at the head of a fleet of liberated POWs. Her reward is to become an admiral, a duchess, and a billionaire. She also becomes an elder sister of twins and, since Nimitz has lost some of his telepathy to war wounds, helps the ever delightful treecats learn signing, thereby proving they are fully sapient. But the war goes on, and the Star Kingdom's superior technology and training increasingly give it the advantage, despite the People's Republic of Haven's efforts to catch up. After several years, the kingdom is approaching total victory, and the "Peeps" must purge the last ideologues on the Committee of Public Safety to maintain any hope of survival. Factor in Honor's personal and professional dilemmas, realistic R&D and procurement problems, spine-tingling action, and the series' usual dry wit, and it is clear that Weber has produced another mandatory acquisition. Roland Green

More About the Author

David Mark Weber is an American science fiction and fantasy author. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1952. Weber and his wife Sharon live in Greenville, South Carolina with their three children and "a passel of dogs".

Previously the owner of a small advertising and public relations agency, Weber now writes science fiction full time.

Customer Reviews

Another exception book by David Weber in the Honor Harrington series.
Michelle (Michy) Devon
Frankly boring plotlines are given page after page of numbing detail and I felt that this book desperately needed a firm editorial hand.
Jeremy Griffiths
The characters are two-dimensional and I don't like any of them very much.
Araki Charlotte

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

85 of 89 people found the following review helpful By Adam Burkeside on March 22, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Ashes of Victory delivers all I have come to expect from a Weber novel EXCEPT a white-knuckled death-ride by Lady Harrington. Well, the bad news for the white-knuckle enthusiasts is that Honor is now too senior to take a single cruiser into the teeth of an entire enemy fleet. The GOOD news is that her universe has just gotten enormously larger in the detail and insight Weber has shared with us.
Yes, the book drags a bit in some spots, particularly in the middle sections, but it also accelerates to a slam-bang conclusion in which monumental changes completely reshape Honor's world. And the book shows us an Honor who is growing up--a woman who is now a mature person, in command of herself and her life . . . and ready for new challenges.
And that's the REALLY good news, because Weber has told us he is no more than half-way through the series, which suggests to me that he used what is admittedly a transition novel to set up fresh challenges, dangers, risks, and--yes--the occasional white-knuckled death-ride by our favorite heroine for many books to come. As for all the other characters, I say bring 'em on! The fact that Honor does not live and achieve things in a vacuum has always been one of the things I love about this series.
I have to agree that if you are not already familiar with the Honorverse this is not the best book with which to begin your acquaintance. But that's what the earlier books are for, so what are you doing sitting around listening to me or anyone else carry on about them? Go buy Basilisk Station and get hooked. The rest of us will be waiting for you when you catch up with us!
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76 of 80 people found the following review helpful By Eric Flint on March 7, 2000
Format: Hardcover
As a fellow writer of science fiction, I feel compelled to take issue with some of the reviews which have appeared here. I'm giving Ashes of Victory 5 stars because it deserves it. For those of you not familiar with David Weber's Honor Harrington series (now, with Ashes of Victory, up to nine volumes), it is one of the most ambitious series currently being written in science fiction. Unlike most series, this one does not consist of a number of individual adventures held together merely by the continuity of a central character. It involves an ever-expanding range of political, social and military forces as the heroine's career progresses.
It is simply not possible to write a successful series of that nature without the author taking the time to develop and explore the complexity of the universe in which it takes place. The kind of relatively simple, straight-ahead action which characterized the earlier volumes of the series can't be sustained forever. At a certain point, the author faces a simple choice: end the series, or go deeper into it. C.S. Forester's Hornblower saga, which is the loose inspiration for Weber's Harrington series, pretty much ended at the point where his character reached the same stage of development that Harrington reaches by the beginning of Ashes of Victory. (Forester wrote only three more volumes, all of which -- which the partial exception of Commodore Hornblower -- were episodic in nature.)
David Weber has chosen to go the other way, and continue depicting his heroine's career after she attains the upper reaches of success and power. I applaud him for doing so. Partly because I love the series and hope to keep reading it for years to come. But, mostly, because I think the story gets more and more interesting as time goes on.
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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By matthew osborne on February 29, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed this book quite a bit, but I hope that it doesn't represent a permanent trend. Treecats are always great, Honor's instructional dinner-parties are painful fun, the new weapons blasting away Peeps with impunity is okay... But where is that "Salamander" tradition? Honor is painted into a corner as far as the story goes; she's recovering from her injuries while the usual assorted enemies continue plotting the demise of Manticore, and the Peep hierarchy undergoes radical revision. It's greatly written, but... I remember when Honor stood between a world and destruction, just an insignificant squadron CO or ship's captain versus a giant battleship full of religious fanatics or so forth, and David Weber made it MORE than just "Sci-Fi." It was EPIC. This book may represent an important crossroad, as it affects the entire setting of the series (and I DO mean the ENTIRE setting), but if you're reading this, David, please put Honor back in a command chair. Or else put Honor away for awhile and play with new, younger toys that can move up in the universe. And you had better fill in those gaps in this book, mister! When you have fellow writers helping to tag the epic lines in the anthologies, I want to know the REAL story of Esther McQueen and what happened at the Octagon, and Rob S. Pierre. Failure to comply will result in further investigation by State Security!
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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Shane Michaels on April 3, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book did an excellent job gathering loose ends together in preparation for the next stage of Honor's carreer, to say nothing of the war against the Peeps. Unfortunately, in order to do this Mr. Weber had to cover everyone, from Protector Benjamin, to Queen Elizabeth, to Honor's mother, to Saint-Just, etc, etc. Sometimes it seemed that Honor got added in as an afterthought. This is a great story if you're a die hard HH fan, but boring if this is the first HH book you've read.
The book is far too light in the action department, and what action there is comes close to the end of the book. However, Mr. Weber's view into the working of government, both Peep and the Allies, is much more detailed than in previous books. Again, great for the series fan, but otherwise.....
This book positions everything nicely for the war to blow up big time. I expect Mr. Weber's next book will live up to our full expectations, much like 'Flag in Exile' was a barn burner after 'Field of Dishonor'. Personally, I enjoy a lot of detail in my books, and I thoroughly enjoyed this read. Mr. Weber, please keep 'em coming!
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