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Ask the Children: The Breakthrough Study That Reveals How to Succeed at Work and Parenting Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Paperbacks (November 14, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688177913
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688177911
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,459,154 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ellen Galinsky, president and cofounder of the Families and Work Institute, helped establish the field of work and family life at Bank Street College of Education, where she was on the faculty for twenty-five years. At the institute, she continues to conduct seminal research on the changing workforce and changing family. Her more than forty books and reports include Ask the Children: The Breakthrough Study That Reveals How to Succeed at Work and Parenting and the now-classic The Six Stages of Parenthood. She has received numerous honorary degrees and awards, including the 2004 Distinguished Achievement Award from Vassar College. She served as the elected president of the National Association for the Education of Young Children and was elected a fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources in 2005. She holds a Master of Science degree in child development and education from Bank Street College of Education and a Bachelor of Arts degree in child study from Vassar College. A popular keynote speaker, she was a presenter at the White House Conference on Child Care in 1997 and on Teenagers in 2000. She is featured regularly in the media, including appearances on Good Morning America, World News Tonight, and The Oprah Winfrey Show.



Ellen Galinsky is co-founder and president of the Families and Work Institute in Manhattan. A leading authority and speaker on work/family issues, she was on the faculty at Bank Street College of Education for twenty-five years and she has authored sixteen books. She lives with her family in upstate New York.

More About the Author

Ellen Galinsky, president and cofounder of the Families and Work Institute, helped establish the field of work and family life at Bank Street College of Education, where she was on the faculty for twenty-five years. At the institute, she continues to conduct seminal research on the changing workforce and changing family. Her more than forty books and reports include Ask the Children: The Breakthrough Study That Reveals How to Succeed at Work and Parenting and the now-classic The Six Stages of Parenthood. She has received numerous honorary degrees and awards, including the 2004 Distinguished Achievement Award from Vassar College. She served as the elected president of the National Association for the Education of Young Children and was elected a fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources in 2005. She holds a Master of Science degree in child development and education from Bank Street College of Education and a Bachelor of Arts degree in child study from Vassar College. A popular keynote speaker, she was a presenter at the White House Conference on Child Care in 1997 and on Teenagers in 2000. She is featured regularly in the media, including appearances on Good Morning America, World News Tonight, and The Oprah Winfrey Show.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Hendry VINE VOICE on March 14, 2003
Format: Paperback
Ask the Children is an interesting book, but one that could be, and probably has been, summarized in a much shorter Parents Magazine article and still be quite useful. Bottom line, the fact that both parents work does not affect children as much as how their parents treat them affects them. Still, this would be an excellent resource for research purposes. I just don't think you need to spend your money simply because you are interested in the topic.
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6 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 13, 2004
Format: Paperback
Don't think this is a great eye-opener. It is apparent that Galinsky undertook the research in order to relieve guilt for working parents. This is not the way to do it. She litters her book with contradictions that invalidate her work. For example, "56 percent of parents assume that their children would wish for more time together....And 50 percent...feel that they have too little time with their child." Then she concludes, "But only 10% of children wish that their mothers would spend more time with them, and 15.5% say the same thing about their fathers."
But then she says later: "39% of children 13 through 18 years old feel they have too little time with their fathers, compared with 29% of children 8-12 years of age." And, "We found that the quantity of time with mothers and fathers does matter a great deal. Children who spend more time with their mothers and fathers on workdays and nonworkdays see their parents more positively, feel that their parents are more successful at managing work and family responsibilities, and see their parents as putting their families first."
In one paragraph she discusses how parents talking about work affects their children, but that they are "reluctant" to talk to their children! How can talkng about work affect children if they are reluctant to talk about it???
So, children are affected, but they're not. They don't want more time, but they really do. Is it 15% or 39%? Most of the research is either bad or of the "duh!" type. If you are doing serious research, look elsewhere; if you want some feel good stuff because you're feeling guilty, stick to the parent magazines.
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is very well-written and well-structured. It assisted me a great deal to write a graduate paper on how teenagers are affected when parents do not play an active role in their child's life. The learnings from the study are very interesting and I highly recommend it to anyone who is a parent.
Enjoy!
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