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Ask Me Again Tomorrow: A Life in Progress Hardcover – July 8, 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Harper; 1 edition (July 8, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060188219
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060188214
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #488,357 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Who can forget Rose Castorini, the feisty Italian mother Dukakis played in 1988's Moonstruck? Dukakis won an Academy Award for her performance and went on to star in Steel Magnolias, Mighty Aphrodite and other films. But most viewers are unaware of Dukakis's laudable stage career of more than 40 years (she's appeared in over 125 productions). In this uplifting autobiography, the first-generation Greek-American recounts her life and work. Dukakis-born in 1931 and a cousin of one-time presidential hopeful Michael-grew up in Lowell, Mass. She and her brother, Apollo, staged plays in the backyard while their parents worked difficult factory jobs. After high school, Dukakis wanted to pursue acting seriously and figured the best way to do it was to make a lot of money doing something-it turned out to be working as a physical therapist-and then moving to New York to act. And that's exactly what she did. Battling low self-esteem, feelings of sorrow and rejection, and facing ethnic and gender biases, Dukakis eventually made it as an actor and, in 1973, launched a theater company with her husband in New Jersey. Playing Rose in Moonstruck changed her life ("Just a few weeks before I had been clipping coupons and shopping for bargain jeans, while working 10 to 12 hour days at the theater. Now I was checking into the Four Seasons"). Although the memoir leaves a few questions unanswered and Dukakis's prose is sometimes vague, this is still a fine portrait of a hardworking, dedicated, proud and inspiring woman, by turns affecting and laugh-out-loud funny. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Her "overnight success," which was 30 years in the making, came in 1988, when Dukakis won the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her portrayal of Rose Castorini in Moonstruck. Although it was not her most challenging role, she recognized why it fit her so well: the ethnicity, the attitude, and the confidence of a matriarchal caregiver. The late 1980s were a fabulous time to be a Dukakis--not only did Olympia win an Oscar but her first cousin Michael was the Democratic nominee for president. Being an Oscar-winning actress meant the phone started to ring continually (she took advantage of her good fortune by constantly promoting the local theater company she and her husband ran), and for the first time, she did not have to worry about how they'd pay the mortgage on their sizable home. Olympia artfully unfolds what makes her tick, from her complex relationship with her pessimistic mother to what it was like to mingle with such greats as Shirley MacLaine ("as high-spirited and generous as she seems") and Julia Roberts ("absolutely no formal training and held her own"). With a heavy promotion schedule planned, expect demand. Mary Frances Wilkens
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Customer Reviews

Very inspirational for all women!
J. Farris
For me, the book became interesting when she recounted the story of her family's life before she was born.
Donald Mitchell
A fast read and highly recommended.
Brady Buchanan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 30, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Long before Olympia Dukakis became well-known for her Academy-Award-winning supporting role as Rose Castorini in Moonstruck, I was a fan of hers based on the outstanding performances she often gave at the Charles Playhouse in Boston in the 1960s. One of the misperceptions that I had about her was that her remarkable control on stage was a reflection of a rock-solid personality. Ask Me Again Tomorrow helped me to see how acting has helped her to get control over her life. It was an unexpected twist for me.
The book opens with the experience of becoming an "overnight" success after thirty years when she won the Academy Award. The event doesn't seem worth dwelling on, except that Ms. Dukakis clearly showed her values were in the right place by using her success to help the Whole Theater, which she had been involved with for 18 years in New Jersey.
For me, the book became interesting when she recounted the story of her family's life before she was born. Several friends of mine who are Greek-Americans say that non-Greek-Americans can never understand what it is like in their families. As I read about Ms. Dukakis's family, I began to get a sense of what they mean. A dominant story from her childhood was about a teenage girl in Greece who had lost her virtue to an overseer. To avenge the dishonor, her brother shot and killed her. The pressure on her to be a "good" Greek-American daughter was unrelenting. Her relationship with her mother was very difficult as a result. Ms. Dukakis was a free spirit as a child, teen and a young adult which set her up for lots of family problems.
Having several family members who would like to act for a living, I also wondered what had drawn her to the profession and what had made her so good at it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Duke Marine on September 8, 2003
Format: Hardcover
She is a beautiful woman and that is a beautiful book. Truly inspiring, this isn't the story of an "overnight success". Olympia deals with alot of adversity, both from outside and her own inner struggles. A surprisingly meaty book. The last few chapters actually had me crying.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Andrew McCaffrey VINE VOICE on August 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I'll admit that I haven't seen very many of the films that Olympia Dukakis has performed in. If I hadn't received a complimentary copy of this book from HarperCollins (there's my interests declared), I would probably not even have thought about picking up this volume. But pick it up I did, although I was worried for a bit. The quotes on the back cover were ominous: most of them seemed to be compliments from her Hollywood friends explaining how wonderful she was, but paying only lip-service to the book itself. The introduction and prologue are similarly worrying in that Dukakis repeated states that she didn't want to write an autobiography and that she doesn't really know who she is from day to day (hence the title of the book). But fortunately, while this wasn't the best celebrity memoir I've read, it's certainly entertaining enough.
The memoir begins with Dukakis recalling her Academy Award nomination (and win) for her portrayal of Rose Castorini in "Moonstruck". After covering this period of her life, she jumps back to her early childhood and spends a lot of time dealing with what it meant to be a first generation Greek-American. She details some of her early acting work, although much of it has a vaguely superficial feel to it. Towards the end of the book, the sections dealing with her more recent thoughts, she outlines her religious views, which (and I'm not quite sure I picked up on all the details) seem to revolve around the idea of a female goddess. Her religious thoughts and meditations obviously mean a great deal to her, although I'm not sure she quite conveyed why they have such a huge impact on her. She merely tells us how important these things are to her and asserts their relevance repeatedly, but we don't really get to see the impact for ourselves.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rhiannon Hawkins on September 18, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I don't usually read many biographies but enjoyed this one...Olympia is a fascinating woman.
Reading her accounts of her childhood, her honesty about the
problems with her mother and about finding herself was not only
interesting but made me wish we were friends.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Blaine Greenfield on January 22, 2008
Format: Paperback
Heard ASK ME AGAIN TOMORROW--read and narrated by
Olympia Dukakis, the actress who became an overnight success
in MOONSTRUCK (after 28 years of hard work).

Dukakis is brutally honest in telling her story . . . in doing so, I got
a feel for what it was like growing up as a Greek-American and, also,
about the difficulties she faced in helping to run The Whole Theater
Company in Montclair, New Jersey, for 19 years.

I also was moved by her tale of alimentation from and eventual
reconciliation with her mother, who eventually developed
Alzheimer's and had to be cared for by Dukakis and her family.

There's humor in the story, too . . . she tells of the time when
her Oscar was stolen and how she eventually made over $9,900
as a result of the theft . . . in addition, I was laughing out loud
when I heard how she "borrowed" a cat to make some
money from a commercial . . . all was going well until
her mother walked in and asked, "Where'd you get that?" A
quick response saved the day: "She always forgets!"

This is one book that I'm glad to have heard rather than
read, largely because of Dukakis' outstanding narration . . . it
left me looking forward to Part 2 of this fascinating woman's
life, which seems to have been promised by the subtitle:
A LIFE IN PROGRESS.
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