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Assassin of Gor Paperback – June, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Masquerade Books; New edition edition (June 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563335387
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563335389
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 4.2 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,121,556 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Norman is creator of the Gorean Saga, a series of novels spanning dozens of titles that began in 1967 with TARNSMAN OF GOR and that are considered to be cult classics. He has also produced a three-installment fictional series, Telnarian Histories, plus two other fiction works and a nonfiction paperback entitled IMAGINATIVE SEX. He continues to write new novels in the Gorean saga, notably WITNESS OF GOR (2002) and PRIZE OF GOR (2008), both published by E-Reads. At Gor Chronicles, a web site specially created for his tremendous fan following, one may read everything there is to know about this unique fictional culture. Mr. Norman was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1931. He is married and has three children. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Amazon Customer
I may not like reading about the Gorean philosophy on sexual roles for men and women, but I can't get enough of Boris' artwork depicting it.
silliman89
John Norman is very good with giving his readers good descriptions and details where you can clearly picture what he is writing about.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By silliman89 on November 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
I read the Gor series as a boy in the 70's and early 80's. IMHO the series is most appealing to teenage boys. I recently pulled "Assassins of Gor" off the shelf one night while bored, and re-read it. I was shocked that there was no real sex, and only a handful of pages of philosophy and psychology that I had to skip over. The book was really excellent, although in a straight forward, uncomplicated sort of way. These are escapist novels, richly detailed, which immerse you in an exotic world, not real thinkers. My enduring memories were of the later books in the series, which were almost unreadable because whole chapters were devoted to philosophy and psychology.
I am not offended by the idea that it is natural and enjoyable for women to be submissive to men. Although I recognize it as wish fulfillment fantasy, still I consider it harmless, especially in such an obviously fictitious setting. I even found it mildly interesting the first time it was mentioned. It is the umpteenth repetition that I find boring. I just turn those pages, skipping ahead to the next action sequence. Speaking of wish fulfillment, I wish someone would edit the series, and re-publish it without these parts. Maybe Eric Flint could do it? He likes to edit, according to his afterword to "1633" and he's good at it. Of course, if you take the sex out of Gor you get Barsoom, and that story has already been written.
I looked on Amazon to see if there was anything new going on with the series, and there was. It is being reprinted, starting at the beginning, and at least 2 new books seem to be published, or at least in the works. I was disappointed though that Amazon didn't have the whole series listed under one easy to find heading. I guess there are, after all, millions of books and only so many Amazon employees.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 27, 2003
Format: Paperback
Clearly "Nomads of Gor" is the most popular of the Gor novels by John Norman, but I would still argue that "Assassin of Gor" is far and away the most ambitious in the series. For that reason, I consider it the best of the Chronicles of Counter-Earth series. Certainly Norman never tried anything of this scope, either in terms of the size or the complexity of the novel, and there is a sense in which this is the last Gor book in which Tarl Cabot is more an Earthman on Gor than a true Gorean. "Assassin of Gor" begins with the title character, Kuurus, being hired to avenge the assassination of Tarl Cabot, a warrior of Ko-ro-ba. The trail leads to Glorious Ar where he finds political intrigue in the House of Cernus, agents of the Priest-Kings, spaceships arriving from Earth with new female captives, a dramatic auction of pleasure slaves, a thrilling tarn race, a climatic battle of gladiators, and a couple of intriguing games of Kaissa (the Gorean version of chess).
As with the best of Norman's books, "Assassin of Gor" is full of vivid characters. Elizabeth Caldwell is back as Cabot's chief ally in finding out why the House of Cernus wants him dead and how they are involved in the endeavors of the Others, the galactic foes of the Priest-Kings. There is also the return of a major character from earlier in the series and a brief flashback involving the fate of the last egg of the Priest-Kings. However, the depth of the book comes out in terms of the new characters, including Mip the Tarn Keeper, Sura the house slave, the new slave girls Phyllis and Virginia, the young warriors Relius and Ho-Sarl, Scormus the young Kaissa champion and Qualius the blind player, and Hup the Fool (my favorite). We also meet a major supporting character for future Gor novels, Samos the slaver of Port Kar.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
Assassin of Gor, the third Gor book that I have read, is clearly inferior to the first two. The storytelling skills so evident in Priest-Kings of Gor and Nomads of Gor are as strongly displayed as ever but it suffers from flaws not present in the other two. Firstly, John Norman has become self-indulgent. He goes into far too much detail on the training and discipline of slaves. To some extent this is necessitated by the plot, a large portion of which takes place in the House of Cernus, the largest slave trader in the city of Ar (think ancient Rome). Nevertheless, it's more detail than I care to read. The counter-argument is that the detail adds to verisimilitude but if you choose this justification, then how do you account for the book's other major flaw: scenes that are so absurdly over-the-top as to be (unintentionally) laughable. Specifically, the slave auction in Chapter 19, the arena battle in Chapter 21, and the tarn race in Chapter 22 defy credulity. Also, the humor which contributed so much to Nomads is missing, but this is a minor quibble. One other point of note: this is the first story to show one of the Others, who were just hinted at in Nomads and become so prominent later in the series from what I have read on this website. The Other is kept offstage for most of the book but is seen briefly and at a distance near the end. On the whole I have to say that this was a fun read but it's not as good as Priest-Kings or Nomads.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By silliman89 on November 24, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read the Gor series as a boy in the 70's and early 80's. IMHO the series is most appealing to teenage boys. I recently pulled "Assassins of Gor" off the shelf one night while bored, and re-read it. I was shocked that there was no real sex, and only a handful of pages of philosophy and psychology that I had to skip over. The book was really excellent, although in a straight forward, uncomplicated sort of way. These are escapist novels, richly detailed, which immerse you in an exotic world, not real thinkers. My enduring memories were of the later books in the series, which were almost unreadable because whole chapters were devoted to philosophy and psychology.
I am not offended by the idea that it is natural and enjoyable for women to be submissive to men. Although I recognize it as wish fulfillment fantasy, still I consider it harmless, especially in such an obviously fictitious setting. I even found it mildly interesting the first time it was mentioned. It is the umpteenth repetition that I find boring. I just turn those pages, skipping ahead to the next action sequence. Speaking of wish fulfillment, I wish someone would edit the series, and re-publish it without these parts. Maybe Eric Flint could do it? He likes to edit, according to his afterword to "1633" and he's good at it. Of course, if you take the sex out of Gor you get Barsoom, and that story has already been written.

I looked on Amazon to see if there was anything new going on with the series, and there was. It is being reprinted, starting at the beginning, and at least 2 new books seem to be published, or at least in the works. I was disappointed though that Amazon didn't have the whole series listed under one easy to find heading. I guess there are, after all, millions of books and only so many Amazon employees.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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