Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$4.22
Condition: Used: Very Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Assertive Discipline--New and Revised: Positive Behavior Management for Today's Classroom Paperback – January 25, 2002

4 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback, January 25, 2002
"Please retry"
$3.77 $0.01

The Importance of Being Little: What Preschoolers Really Need from Grownups by Erika Christakis
"The Importance of Being Little" by Erika Christakis
A bold challenge to the conventional wisdom about early childhood. Learn more | See related books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Teacher Supplies
Browse our Teacher Supplies store, with everything teachers need to educate students and expand their learning.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 263 pages
  • Publisher: Canter & Associates; Revised edition (January 25, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0939007452
  • ISBN-13: 978-0939007455
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #131,166 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

I felt that this was a well thought out method of providing structure in the classroom. The ideas presented are practical and allow a teacher to satisfy the needs of all students while teaching. I have put some of these methods into practice with amazing results. Suddenly, even the most troubled student feels that he can be successful in class. Most students with behavior problems simply need the right type of attention - once they have it, their unproductive behaviors begin to fade. I was amazed at the response I received from using these techniques - I connected with a particular student that I thought would never be reached.
Comment 35 of 35 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
As a new teacher, I was desperately searching for a guide to assist me in classroom management and Lee Canter provided it! This book can be useful for all K-12 teachers. It includes helpful examples of classroom situations, many which explain actions to take when students do not respond to preliminary behavior management. This book provides realistic, practical and applicable advice for today's classroom teacher. I highly recommend it.
Comment 38 of 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
I first encountered Lee Canter's Assertive Discipline concepts in college, and again later while on the board of directors for a school.
Canter's approach is PRACTICAL, not ideological, and his goal is for you to have a classroom in which you can teach.
That's it: simply a classroom environment that is functional enough that you can teach.
I disagree with a previous reviewer: the point behind classroom discipline isn't to teach "critical thinking skills" or to have students analyze whether "Please take out your homework and pass it to the front of the classroom" is a reasonable, just, appropriate, or relevant instruction.
Getting compliance with basic classroom rules is NOT the same as controlling or manipulating students. You, the teacher, are supposed to be in charge of what happens in your classroom. Living up to your job description will not hurt your students or turn them into uncritical automata.
The real purpose of classroom management is to make it possible for you to TEACH in the first place. The fact is that, no matter how brilliantly you present today's objectives, if the classroom is too loud and chaotic for students to pay attention, then you might as well have just stayed in bed.
I really believe that the first step in direct instruction is to provide a classroom where students are able to be in their places, to look at you, and to pay attention -- or at least not prevent everyone else from doing so.
One idea I developed from Canter's book: attitudes are the family's problem.
Read more ›
Comment 26 of 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
I've been using Assertive Discipline since 1987. I've used it in 4 different schools, (elementary and secondary), during summer school sessions and in CCD classes.

My very first year using it, it eliminated 99% of any and all discipline problems I was having. Students quickly learned what the rules were and what would happen if they chose to break those rules. This created an environment that was conducive to learning. The students were more relaxed because the atmosphere was orderly and calm.

One of the positive rewards I used was positive notes and phone calls home. Parents were pleased and surprised to get a phone call from the school telling them that their child appeared happy in class, was performing well, turning in all his homework, etc.

I used other rewards as well, such as points towards individual and class-wide rewards, etc. I actually had students spurring each other on to make sure they turned in their homework, completed their work accurately and neatly and so on.

The use of Assertive Discipline will remove much of the uncertainty from teaching. It answers the question, "What will I do when...?"

You will have a plan. The students will know what will happen if they choose to misbehave. It's not simply about 'rewards and punishments' as it is about learning to make appropriate choices. We all have to do that, and we all have to learn to do it sometime.

Most students know how to behave properly. Sadly, many choose not to. I'm not a social worker, but I have a job to do and I can't do it if there's chaos in the classroom.

This program is especially useful for new teachers.
Read more ›
Comment 5 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
My experiences with Canter's approach have been disappointing. It can be that this approach will work, though not with the students who have the real problems, but it does NOT TEACH students how to control their behavior. It does not teach students anything except how to receive rewards and how to avoid punishments. Better to read some research on classroom management, Alfie Kohn, or Love and Logic. I believe what we need to do is help our students make better choices. I don't think this approach does that. Read lots of things and decide for yourself.
Comment 11 of 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse