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Astro Boy and Anime Come to the Americas: An Insider's View of the Birth of a Pop Culture Phenomenon Paperback – December 4, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0786438662 ISBN-10: 0786438665

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: McFarland (December 4, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786438665
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786438662
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,887,549 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Informative history...a welcome addition...recommended." --Midwest Book Review

About the Author

Writer and director Fred Ladd adapted Astro Boy, Gigantor, Kimba, The White Lion, The New Adventures of Gigantor, G-Force, Sailor Moon and other Japanese animated series for American television.

Harvey Deneroff is a professor in the animation department of the Savannah College of Art and Design and is the founder of the Society for Animation Studies. He lives in Decatur, Georgia.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Today Japanese animation (or anime) is a staple of American comic books, movies, videos, and television programming. But it did not begin until its introduction in 1963 when a Japanese animated television series called 'Tetsuan Atom' was aired by NBC affiliates. Fred Ladd adapted for American television this Japanese series for children, and in the process changed the title to 'Astro Boy'. It became an overnight success being something distinctively different from conventional and ordinary American children's entertainment television fare. Ladd went on to adapt many other Japanese animated television programs and with the assistance of Harvey Deneroff (Professor in the animation department of the Savannah College of Art and Design, and founder of the Society for Animation Studies), in "Astro Boy and Anime Come to the Americas: An Insider's View Of The Birth Of A Pop Culture Phenomenon" provides an informed and informative history of the Japanese animated series for American television that included such successes as 'Gigantor', 'Kimba The White Lion', 'G-Force', 'Sailor Moon', among others. "Astro Boy and Anime Come to the Americas" is a welcome addition to academic library Art History and Animation Studies reference collections, and especially recommended reading for the non-specialist general public with an interest in Japanese anime in all its forms and formats.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Barat on June 13, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If only Ladd and Deneroff had stuck to the premise of this book's subtitle: "An Insider's View of the Birth [italics mine] of a Pop Culture Phenomenon"! There are at least two or three distinct narratives sloshing around within this slender volume, and, for my money, the most intriguing of these was the first: the story of how Ladd -- virtually the only surviving member of the small group of Americans involved -- and pioneering creators in Japan joined forces to bring the "first wave" of anime (Japanese animation) to the United States. Ladd was there from the start, and he clears away a number of the remaining mysteries surrounding the production of Astro Boy, Kimba the White Lion, and other beloved TV series of the 1960s. Once Ladd gets beyond this "comfort zone," however, the book becomes a grab-bag of factoids about more modern anime series. "Old sourdoughs" like me who prefer "those 60s shows" will have little interest in this material, while younger fans will find the coverage superficial. It's possible that Ladd and Deneroff included this later material simply to give the volume enough "heft" to sell to McFarland. While not exactly bad, the book's extreme unevenness makes it, in my view, a marginal purchase for general animation fans, to say nothing of anime devotees.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a great story of not only how how Anime came to The U.S. but it is also an interesting look at the Carree of Fred Ladd. It provides a wealth of information on all the things a Japaneses animated series must go through to reach The U.S. as well as wonderful behind scenes stories from the making of such series as Kimba The White Lion, Astro Boy, Gigantor, and may others. It also details Fred Ladd's work with Japaneses Anime creators such as Osamu Tezuka. I recommend this book to any fans of the history of Anime or just Anime in general.
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