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Astronomy: The Evolving Universe Hardcover – March 19, 1991

ISBN-13: 978-0471522676 ISBN-10: 0471522678 Edition: 6th
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"A slick introductory textbook that vaguely resembles a really thick Discover magazine. Zeilik...presents each topic in a patient, engaging manner, and even includes some material from his research on astronomy in the historic and prehistoric Pueblo world." Book News

"This is an ideal reference book which can be used in conjunction with lecture material." Astronomy & Space

"The science is accurate and presented in a logical sequence, with concepts stressed more than vocabulary. The photos and figures have been thoughtfully selected and generously sized, and the prose is written in an engagingly colloquial style.... The text continually explains the significance of what the reader is studying.... anyone seeking a good descriptive overview of astronomy at the dawn of the 21st century should certainly consider using this excellent book." Science Books and Films

"...provides a clearly written introduction to astronomy for undergraduates or interested novices. It is recommended for undergraduate science collections, as well as public libraries providing continuing education resourcesin the sciences." E-Streams --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

This highly illustrated textbook for a one-semester introduction to astronomy describes the full range of the astronomical universe and how astronomers think about the cosmos. This ninth edition is more streamlined than earlier editions, presenting only that material needed by students. Each topic is presented in a patient, engaging manner, and includes the lastest astronomical research. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 568 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 6 edition (March 19, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471522678
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471522676
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 1 x 11.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,193,274 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By "physix" on May 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
If you were ever interested in what is going on above in heavens, but didn't want to trouble yourself with too much equations and other non-esential stuff, then this is the book for you. It is a textbook, and it reads as a textbook. You'll find that everything is included: from our Solar system, to the nuclear processes in the stars, to the black holes. Descriptions are as they should be for the non-pros: comprehensive and simple (yet not trivial), well presented (love those many color pictures) and to the point. Great for an occasional star-gazer as well as astronomy students to revise their knowledge. And the Night Spectra Quest is a neat beginner's tool to examining star spectra. If you get more interested after studying this book, I recommend "An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics", which goes more deeply into the study of astrophysics and cosmology.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on May 22, 2004
Format: Paperback
Zeilik's book is one of the earliest systematic astronomy texts I ever read, beginning with the third edition back in 1982. That edition had four primary sections - Part I: Changing Concepts of the Cosmos; Part II: The Planets, Past and Present; Part III: The Universe of Stars and Galaxies; and Part IV: Cosmic Evolution.
Part I looks at the general structure of the universe, how it was conceived in the past, and how it is viewed today. Much of what is covered here falls under the general heading of cosmology. Zeilik has an interest in the history of astronomy, and it shows clearly in the text. He explores, among other topics, the Anasazi prehistoric astronomy discoveries, the Ptolemaic geocentric model, Tycho Brahe/Kepler's achievements, the discoveries of Newton and Galileo, and finally the birth of modern astrophysics. Some basic physics is introduced along the way, to make sense of radiation and optics, as well as gravitation and space-time concepts.
Part II looks at the nine planets of our solar system, including their satellites (moons), and the asteroids and other solar system objects (comets, etc.). Planetary sciences are among the fastest developing sciences around, so a lot of the information contained here is basic, and some updating is required. There is no mistake that the most current version of this text is now in its ninth edition. The final chapter in this subject looks at some of the theories of the origin and development of the solar system.
Part III looks at the universe beyond the planets, looking first at the sun as a typical small star, and then going further afield to look at the Milky Way, our local galaxy in some detail.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rya on July 14, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good. But if you want to really understand the subject in as much detail as an aspiring astronomer, you may want a more challenging text. This seemed light on details. But as an overall introduction, it is very good, as any 9th edition should be. My one complaint is the number of exclamation marks used in the text. It seemed like every 20-40 lines there was something amazing to say that required an exclamation mark. It got to be a bit much.
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By Robert Williams on September 10, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Astronomy: The Evolving Universe, 4th edition by Michael Zeilik is an older edition (1985) of a more recent text. Thus, it is very dated in many respects. There is, however, some very basic information of the cosmos and also some material concerning the history of astronomy that has not changed.

There are few color photos (if you care about those things) but many B&W drawings, star charts, photos and maps. There is a glossary and a periodic chart.

I would not recommend this book for any astronomy/science course because of its age. It is of course informative in its own way.
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