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Asylum: Hollywood Tales from My Great Depression: Brain Dis-Ease, Recovery, and Being My Mother's Son Hardcover


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Asylum: Hollywood Tales from My Great Depression: Brain Dis-Ease, Recovery, and Being My Mother's Son + No Kidding, Me 2!  : Mental Illness Documentary
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Weinstein Books (April 24, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1602861358
  • ISBN-13: 978-1602861350
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #278,830 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Andy Garcia
“A must read! Joey Pants gives us insights so valuable that one can only call his courage to share a blessing for all.”

Tommy Lee Jones
“Joey has written a brave, fascinating book. It is astonishing what people will put themselves through for the privilege of acting. Maybe we just can’t help it.”

Andrew Davis, director of The Fugitive
“Bravo! Joe Pantoliano’s very honest, moving, hilarious, and tragic telling of a life’s journey is both profound and enlightening. Asylum will make anyone who reads it a more generous and understanding human being.”

Robert Irvin, M.D., Instructor of Psychiatry,Harvard Medical School
“Pantoliano’s book reveals his ever-evolving understanding of himself and his disease through a retrospective analysis of his life’s most painful and jubilant experiences. The book provides a model of inspiration and courage for those who suffer from mental illness in silence to come forward and seek the life-changing help that is currently available.”

Jacqueline Lerner, Ph.D., Professor of Applied Developmental Psychology, Boston College
“Joey Pantoliano shows insight, humor, and brilliant storytelling as he unpacks his life to understand his challenges. Joey has opened himself up so that others can benefit from what he has discovered about mental illness. No one should miss this candid and richly told memoir.”

Richard M. Lerner, Ph.D., Bergstrom Chair in Applied Developmental Science; Director, Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development, Tufts University
“With honesty, humor, and integrity, Joey Pantoliano uses his life story to inspire hope that each of us can thrive despite emotional challenges and family turmoil. Joey’s story exemplifies the fundamental human capacities for resilience and positive growth.”

About the Author

Joe Pantoliano was born in Hoboken, New Jersey. He has more than one hundred movie, TV, and stage credits, and won an Emmy Award for his work on The Sopranos. His first book, Who’s Sorry Now? The True Story of a Stand-up Guy, was a New York Times bestseller. Pantoliano is also the founder of No Kidding, Me Too!, a nonprofit organization “whose purpose is to remove the stigma attached to ‘brain dis-ease’ through education and the breaking down of societal barriers.” He produced and directed the documentary No Kidding! Me 2!, an intimate look at the experiences of Americans living with mental illness. He lives in Connecticut.


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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I found I was laughing out loud while reading this book.
shopping crazy
A must read for any fan of the charismatic actor, or anyone suffering from clinical depression/ADHD/dyslexia.
Anita Watts
Kudos, Joey for your bravery and your gift in sharing so much of yourself.
Allison

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By David Kinchen on April 25, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Asylum: 1. An institution for the care of the mentally ill. 2. A place that provides protection or safety -- Webster's II New Riverside University Dictionary

You know the asylum is run by the inmates when your shrink in New York doubles as your agent in Hollywood, getting you into the movies.

That was the actual experience of Joe Pantoliano ('Midnight Run,' 'Risky Business,' 'The Fugitive', 'The Goonies', 'Memento', 'The Matrix', 'Canvas', 'The Sopranos') as he recalls it in his memoir "Asylum: Hollywood Tales from My Great Depression: Brain Dis-Ease, Recovery, and Being My Mother's Son". In the early 1970s Pantoliano was a struggling (aren't they all?) East Coast actor and was in a group therapy class conducted by Ralph Ricci, the father of actress Christina Ricci.

As with all of Pantoliano's relationships, the one with Ricci was complicated: He was a mentor and he was manipulative like Joey's mother, and he was ambitious to get out of the shrink business and become an agent in Hollywood, so, as Joey writes Ralph Ricci convinced agent Annette Hanley to work for him in Hollywood.

"When Ralph got to L.A. he started running group therapy but maintained a group in New York as well. Sort of bipolar bicoastal," Joey writes. Ralph promised Joey that if he'd move to the West Coast he would introduce him to a partner of their's, Harry Ufland. Joey Pants was part of the actor exodus of the 1970s and benefited greatly from his endorsement by his association with the agency started by Ricci, Ufland and Handley, which morphed into United Talent Agency (UTA).
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Marcia F. on April 15, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Asylum is a wild and sassy ride through a minefield. Joey attacks the seriousness of mental dis-ease with his unmistakable brand of self effacing humor. For a man who plays a tough guy, Joey is vulnerable, sensitive, and tender. He reveals his personal struggles and his daily reprieve through 12 Step Programs in a book that I read through so fast I barely had time to eat for hours. Thanks for helping with my eating dis-ease, Joey! :D
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By robert faitell on May 24, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
ASYLUM IS BOTH AN EXTREMELY FUNNY AND MONUMENTALLY IMPORTANT BOOK. THERE IS SO MUCH FOR ALL TO IDENTIFY WITH...WHICH WILL HELP YOU FEEL LESS ALONE AND PART OF...AND INSPIRED TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT YOUR WIRING. AT THE SAME TIME, YOU CAN READ A BOOK THAT IS FILLED WITH GREAT STORIES, MANY OF WHICH LEFT ME LAUGHING OUT LOUD...BY MYSELF. JP HAS TAKEN A BRAVE STEP TO TALK ABOUT HIS LIFE, HIS DEFECTS OF CHARACTER AND STRUGGLES. EVEN THOUGH I HAVE LIVED A LIFE FAR DIFFERENT THAN THAT OF A SUCCESSFUL AND EXTREMELY TALENTED CHARACTER ACTER (WHO WE'VE ALL SEEN SO MANY TIMES IN DOZENS OF MOVIES), I WAS ABLE TO IDENTIFY WITH SO MUCH. WHEN I FINISHED THE BOOK, I KNEW RIGHT AWAY THAT I FELT BETTER, AND IN MORE CONTROL OF MY LIFE. MOREOVER, I WAS STILL LAUGHING AT SOME OF THE STORIES SHARED IN THIS WONDERFUL READ.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Richard Seiler on September 19, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
sounded like an explanation for mental crutch. wouldn't recommend it. i hate wrting long reviews. not more to say on this one
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By jscho on January 17, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was a pleasure to read. While his life journey is much different than mine, our mental health journey is very similar. Its nice to see someone as talented and famous as him talk about the demons he overcame. His idea of dis-ease is great!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Allison on June 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Having enjoyed Mr. Pantoliano's incredible work in movies and television for many, many years, I had the privilege of hearing him speak at our local library about this book and could not wait to get home and read it. I was interested to learn about the challenges he faced in his personal life in such a candid, heartfelt and yes, very humorous, engaging and self-deprecating, manner. What a great service he has provided in sharing his story! I encourage everyone to read it, and ESPECIALLY to share it with high school and college age kids to help them understand brain dis-ease, for it's with our youth that we have the best chance of breaking down stigma and misunderstanding, and of course so that those who may be suffering will realize they are not alone and that help is available.

Kudos, Joey for your bravery and your gift in sharing so much of yourself. Many people will see themselves or their family members reflected in your stories. Thank you, thank you, thank you!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By W. Smith on May 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This a great book for anyone diagnosed with depression or anyone who wants to relate to someone with the disease. It is also great for anyone who spent much of their life wondering what's wrong. Like Joe Pantoliano, I too "loathe the term mental illness". After reading Asylum, I now prefer "brain dis-ease" or BD. I am grateful to Joe P. for pointing out that people with BD are not weak and BD is not a character flaw. We can't "snap out of it". Joe P. offers much more understanding of the disease and discusses how his disease was behind many of his actions and emotions (addictions, fear, trauma). This was very comforting to me. Asylum is also a funny and entertaining memoir of his Italian upbringing in Hoboken, NJ up to his success in Hollywood (aka the "asylum"). I was fascinated with his mother and laughed out loud with his memories of her. I especially enjoyed reading about his friendship with Natalie Wood and Robert Wagner. He actually offers some insight into Ms. Wood's tragic death. I found it especially interesting that he could not get insurance coverage on one of his films due to his brain dis-ease, but his high cholesterol was not a problem. He was probably at a higher risk of heart attack than jumping off a nearby cliff. This is the stigma that must end!

What I can't understand about this first edition book is how it was published with such glaring errors in editing. Did I get a bad book? I wanted to take notes for my future reference regarding BD, so I had a pen and paper handy and listed a few errors. I had no idea Joe Pantoliano was on the CBS show "The Hander" (page 23). Shouldn't that be "The Handler"? How about the word "something" spelled "soemthing" on page 26. On page 90 he discusses Mark Crowley who helped "devolop" Hart to Hart.
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