Asylum 2005 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(191) IMDb 6.1/10
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A woman becomes very curious about one of her psychiatrist husband's inmates, a man who was found guilty in the murder and disfigurement of his former wife.

Starring:
Natasha Richardson, Hugh Bonneville
Runtime:
1 hour, 40 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Asylum

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller, Romance
Director David Mackenzie
Starring Natasha Richardson, Hugh Bonneville
Supporting actors Gus Lewis, Ian McKellen, Joss Ackland, Wanda Ventham, Sarah Thurstan, Alwyne Taylor, Maria Aitken, Hazel Douglas, Anna Keaveney, Marton Csokas, Robert Willox, Judy Parfitt, Sean Harris, Andy de la Tour, Roy Boyd, Rhydian Jones, Nick Chadwin, Jonathan Bridge
Studio Paramount
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

The acting and story are very good.
TERE
Other scenes seemed barely stitched together or crafted.
Jeffrey M. Davis
Good movie, but a disappointing ending.
Mavdoc

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Jenny J.J.I. VINE VOICE on July 7, 2006
Format: DVD
This film was recommended to me from Amazon because I'm also a fan of these types of movies. From "Basic Instinct" to "The Lover", these movies really intrigue me.This movie was directed by David Mackenize who also directed the overrated "Young Adam" which was cold and boring. "Asylum" on the other hand is a better achievement by the director. One of the factors that can add to the excitement and tension of the adulterous affair is the danger of being caught. Add to that, the fierce and idiosyncratic passion often attributed to artists. Then make the artist a raving psychopath and you have a pretty heady mix.

So finds the story of Asylum, your place into a world of sexual obsession, violence and madness. Stella (Natasha Richardson) is wearily married to Max (Hugh Bonneville), a psychiatrist working in a 1950s hospital for the criminally insane. He is overbearing to the point of being monstrous (by modern standards), joking to her about her being his 'pet patient' whilst expecting her to be a no-brainer wife who says the right things when introduced socially. In the initial build up, Mackenzie let's us see the smouldering lust in the face of inmate Edgar, who's incarcerated for murdering and decapitating his wife in a jealous rage. Just as he did with his previous movie, "Young Adam," Mackenzie excels at portraying barely sublimated animal sensuality, which soon bursts across the screen in a way that is at once base and beautiful. Helen knows how insane Edgar is, and her feelings for him, but she is gradually drawn into his web of madness, together with her son.

"Asylum" is visually appealing with it's dank, grey tones This film has it's explosions of repressed sexuality that is frightening in its force and surprising in its ending.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on April 16, 2006
Format: DVD
In the 1960s Max Raphael (Hugh Bonneville) becomes a director at an English asylum that dates from the Victorian era and that peculiar combination of lavish grounds and dungeons that reflected the evolving sensibilities towards the mentally ill. He is accompanied by his wife, Stella (Natasha Richardson), and their young son, Charlie (Gus Lewis), with the family living on the grounds. The family is greeted by Peter Cleave (Ian McKellen), who has been at this place for a long time, quite possibly since the days of good old Queen Victoria, and he expected to be given the administrative position. Now he is relegated to being Max's chief assistant, and when Max makes a point of remind Peter, "I am your superior," Peter responds by asking "In what sense?" The remark is uttered with a charming smile, but there is such an underlying threat behind it that you immediately think of the spider and the fly.

One of Peter's patients is Edgar Stark (Marton Csokas), who is assigned the task of rebuilding a gardener's shed that Stella wants to use. When Charlie, desperate for attention and some form of friendship, develops a relationship with Edgar, which has Stella concerned. When something happens to Charlie, she assumes Edgar is responsible, and when that turns out not to be the case, her feelings for Edgar turn into something else. The next thing we know, every opportunity she can find, Stella is stealing away to the shed for bouts of intense sex with Edgar. Stella never articulates her reasoning for this affair and we are left to piece together our own thoughts by looking at her relationships with her husband and son, the life she is forced to live at the asylum, and the mysterious stranger who wants her.
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 20, 2006
Format: DVD
Stella Raphael (Natasha Richardson) is a troubled woman. Repressed and bored, she's the long-suffering wife of a mental hospital's deputy director, Max Raphael (Hugh Bonneville). It's the late 1950s, and Stella's marriage to Max is a case study in dreariness and boredom. A puritanical psychiatrist, Max treats Stella like she's an undeserving servant, an excess piece of baggage there to fulfill Max's own whims.

Max has just landed an apparently cushy job at a British asylum outside London, and he expects Stella to not only fit in with all the other psychiatrist wives, but also do her best to make sure that his tenure at the hospital is made permanent. Their young son Charlie (Gus Lewis) gives Stella much pleasure, but there's still something missing in her life; it's just not enough to spend her days planning parties for the inmates and gossiping with her colleagues.

Her redeemer comes in the form of the enigmatic loony hunk Edgar (Marton Csokas), a sexy, handsome, brooding brute of a sculptor who once decapitated his wife for seeing other men. At first, Edgar helps Stella in her household chores, and becomes a playmate to young Charlie, but before long Stella is putting fresh lipstick on, swigging back the scotch for courage, and searching Edgar out for afternoon trysts in the rundown green house with hospital guards or family only scant hidden yards away.

The physical encounters are raw and sexual, with both of them unleashing all their bottled up frustrations and desires. Soon they are falling in love, both perhaps unaware that the affair can lead nowhere. Their fanatical obsession for one another soon gets the better of them, with Stella contemplating leaving her husband and child, while Edgar manages to escape, seeking refuge in the back alleyways of London.
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