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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Definitive History of Atari
There was a time when Atari was more well-known than Nintendo and Nolan Bushnell was almost as well-known as Steve Jobs. For many who grew up in the video game "golden age" of the 1970s and 1980s, Atari is still the quintessential video game company. Over the years, much has been written about the history of Atari. Unfortunately, much of it is wrong and a much more has...
Published 20 months ago by Keith Smith

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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unique, Amazing, Critically And Tragically Flawed
The book is unique. There will be no other book on this subject that can match the research and background information.
The book is amazing. No one else has collected so many first hand accounts, documents, photographs, and even hardware (I think!).

But it is critically, because it is so unique and so amazing, tragically flawed.

I first heard...
Published 13 months ago by Chad Hart


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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unique, Amazing, Critically And Tragically Flawed, June 17, 2013
This review is from: Atari Inc.: Business is Fun (Paperback)
The book is unique. There will be no other book on this subject that can match the research and background information.
The book is amazing. No one else has collected so many first hand accounts, documents, photographs, and even hardware (I think!).

But it is critically, because it is so unique and so amazing, tragically flawed.

I first heard about this book last August. This Spring it became availible on Amazon Kindle (iPad is my preferred way to read books). The anticipation was great.
I had read a sample chapter before and I already knew the authors intentions to keep things "in present tense". I think that's clunky and strange. I had expressed some concern about the prose (lots of run-un and compound sentences). But what other book like it would come out? There won't ever be. So I knew I had to get it, even though it was self-published and will lack polish.

(And before you go after this post written in a box for all kinds of grammar, style, syntax, typo, or spelling mistakes, remember, this is an Amazon review. A book has a higher standard. A book about Atari so meticulously researched should have had an even higher standard.)

But it is not an exaggeration to say that there is a mistake on every three or four pages. Whether a typo, editing mistake, or grammar mistake, there is one every three or four pages.
Examples:
*Every time the word "life" appears, it is "LIFE" (perhaps someone did a find and replace-all to make LIFE magazine references have proper capitalization?) -ex: "the battery LIFE lasts one hour." (loc 3252). "the ERIC came to LIFE by pleasantly" (loc 3205).
*Extended (and usually improper) use of ellipsis... One period will do...
*Inconsistent use of italics when referencing games/titles, sometimes Spacewar! is in italics (as it should be), sometimes it's not. Multiply that by the dozens and dozens of times game titles are used and it can get confusing.
*Editing mistakes where you can see remains of words left behind by insertions or cuts. "was exactly when Spacewar! ly was written" (loc 400 in Amazon Kindle). Don't know why the ly is there, but there's a dozen of examples like that in the book.
*There's often a comma before the word 'and' even when it doesn't need to be there. Example "Things were moving along now, and he was blown away by the progress that Nolan had made constructing the game." (loc 612). The comma doesn't need to be there. Every time a comma is used it's supposed to set something apart for clarity or tell the reader to pause. Neither of those things should be happening in that sentence. The comma doesn't need to be and shouldn't be there. There's dozens of examples of this in the book.
*Every time the word 'pong' appears, it is PONG. Which is correct for Atari PONG. But 'actual tennis or ping-PONG match' on loc 937 and others shows that find-replace-all was used sloppily.
*Typos and misplaced words leading to confusion. "The PCBs and components were the easiest to take of. A guy named Marty Carlucci happened to have a PCB manufacturing shop literally right across from their back shipping at 2930," To take 'of'? 'Their back shipping'? I'm guessing they meant 'to take on' and 'back door' from context, but you shouldn't have to guess from context in a book.
*No-lan - I don't know if this is from weird type setting issues or manually trying to fix page layout in the printed books, but much of the time Nolan's name is "No-lan" in the text. Not all the time, but many times. Maybe 50-50.
*Capitalization - sentences not capitalized. "Next was the jogging text. after running for two miles" (loc 3252). "After" should have been capitalized.
*Duplicate words - "given it's designed designed by the Cyan Engineering team." (loc 3205) (many examples...hard to find looking back, but stand out when you read it)

Is all of this a nitpick? I don't know. It's enough to throw me, momentarily, out of the book, out of the narrative, out of whatever story the authors are trying to tell.
That's the flaw of the book. There's some sort of great vision, a compelling story - but it's jeopardized by the prose. Sure, even if you leave in the stylistic choice and the heavy use of compound sentences, the use of cliches like "keep in mind", "picture this", and the appearance of "WHAT?!?" in the text (and I'm sure there's justifications for all of this, even though it makes it read like a long forum post or web page), you still have to acknowledge the typos and editing mistakes.

They said they've had people edit it. Well, it was worth another pair of eyes.

It's a unique, amazingly researched, but tragically it is critically flawed.
Had the book not been self-published (and I'm sure they'd rather have had it been picked up!), I can imagine other great things that could have been in the book.

Like:
*A map. There's a half dozen addresses flying around, and sometimes pictures of buildings, but as the Atari company was growing I think I'd have liked to see a map.
*Character introductions. There's probably a hundred people mentioned in the book. Some of them are not important, some of them are. In a proper book I can imagine 'important' characters given little side boxes with a head shot and a small biography, like in a text book. There's just way too many people to keep track of and as a reader I'm left to "should I care about this name?"
*Point/Counter Point/Reflection. There's sometimes have differing opinions or viewpoints on what happened. What should be taken at face value? What was Nolan trying to accomplish in his 1978 outburst? What would he say NOW about what he was doing and what maybe he should have done? What would Ted say about what he should have done when he was pushed out? Does Nolan regret not spending enough time watching the store? There's so many times in the book I wanted to hear what the other side of the story thought about it or what they think now about their behavior.
I'm sure the authors aren't holding back on any interviews they have or anything, it just feels like horrible things happen in the story or allegations are made and there's no analysis or introspection. So Nolan stopped coming to work. Nolan pushed Ted out. Nolan didn't pay Ted for his PTT work. WHY? What's Nolan's reality distortion field tell him? How does Ted feel about it now?
*More Focus - sometimes it reads like a court deposition and sometimes it reads like a movie script. In a proper book the anecdotal stories or randomness about 'employee of the month' (who cares!) could have been given side bars. As lines and lines of text it all feels a little unrelenting.
*Real photo spreads. The photos often look terrible on the iPad (Amazon resolution limitation, plus I suspect source material not being high enough resolution. This could have had some AMAZING photographs. Amazing.

I sincerely admire the authors for this undertaking and the courage to self-publish. Not an easy route. Atari? Not a small undertaking. This isn't a book of myths and over-told exaggerations. (It might have a few new exaggerations, but that's okay! That's the process of history.) This book is a big deal and I thank the authors.
I also hope a second edition happens. And I really hope they get some better advice and new editors on the second volume. The material and subject deserve it.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Definitive History of Atari, November 29, 2012
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This review is from: Atari Inc.: Business is Fun (Paperback)
There was a time when Atari was more well-known than Nintendo and Nolan Bushnell was almost as well-known as Steve Jobs. For many who grew up in the video game "golden age" of the 1970s and 1980s, Atari is still the quintessential video game company. Over the years, much has been written about the history of Atari. Unfortunately, much of it is wrong and a much more has gone untold. Until now. Atari, Inc. Business is Fun the first volume in what will be the definitive history of this legendary company. The authors have spent the better part of a decade researching, interviewing, digging, and uncovering a trove of information about Atari, much of it previously unknown except to those who lived it.

The first of three volumes, this one covers Atari from its beginnings up to the Tramiel buyout in 1984.
There are dozens and dozens of fascinating stories scattered amongst its 800(!!) pages, including the real stories of the first mass-produced arcade video game and Atari's beginnings, the story of the 2600, 5200, and 7800, Atari's arcade hits, Atari's little-known skunkworks. The truth about the New Mexico graveyard of VCS cartridges (just one of many sacred cows that are slain here) and much, much more.
If you love pictures, you're in for a real treat. There are probably about 300 pages of them including company picnics, internal documents, artwork, rare prototypes, secret agreements and more.

The negatives? There are a few. The photos are all black-and-white (I believe a more expensive color version will be released later). There's no index. And there are some stylistic issues (the biggest for me being authors' choice to relate certain key incidents in the presnt tense to create a "you are there" feeling. Some may find the use of present tense and the shifting to past tense distracting [I did]). There are some typos (though on first reading, there seemed to be surprisingly few for the first edition of a self-published book). There are also a number of sentences that I found clunky.

For me, however, the many postivies outweigh the negatives and I was willing to overlook the stylistic issues. Those with a less rabid interest in classic gaming, however, may not be.
If you have any interest in classic video games, you will find much to love here and if you are a fan of Atari, this is an absolute must-have.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Definitive History of Warner-era Atari, May 18, 2013
This review is from: Atari Inc.: Business is Fun (Paperback)
This book is filled with well-researched facts about Atari under the leadership of Nolan Bushnell and then under Warner ownership. It dispels many of the myths that have built up around the company over the years and provides many newly discovered facts about the company, the people that worked for it, and its products. For long-time Atari fans like me, it's fantastic to read the insider stories and look at the photographs of never-released products.

It's just unfortunate that all of this great information isn't given the presentation it deserves. The volume contains numerous grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors. They're so numerous (and of such a simple and obvious nature) that one can't help but come to the conclusion that the volume was never edited at all. And that's a shame, because it's obvious how much work the authors put into researching the subject matter. If only they'd paused for a moment and had a competent editor fix their prose, the result could have been flawless. As it is, I can recommend the book to anyone who is interested in the history of Atari, video games, or computers...but only if they're willing to slog through an error-laden volume.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Almost Definitive, April 3, 2013
This review is from: Atari Inc.: Business is Fun (Paperback)
I was very excited upon this book's release and received my copy as a Christmas present last year. Being an Atari fan and nerd at heart, I took to reading it almost immediately.

First, the good things about the book:

Curt Vendel and Marty Goldberg of Atari Museum spent a lot of time interviewing and obtaining documents not previously released to the public. It debunk myths that over time became accepted as common knowledge, including:

-The creation of Computer Space
-The reason for starting the home computer line and the person who suggested it
-The development of the 5200
-The mass dumping of inventory at the Alamogordo, NM landfill

And being just under 800 pages and costing less than $50 is pretty impressive for a paperback.

Then there are the bad things:

There are several typos throughout the book. I would not have minded had its release been delayed so that editing could have continued.

I wonder if it was really necessary to feature unflattering events from Nolan Bushnell's personal life. It also would have been nice to have more commentary from the late president of Amiga, David Morse. Although both have lied about their contributions and legal dealings with Atari Inc./Warner Communications, the way they are portrayed overall is quite shameful.

Shortcomings aside, I not only recommend this book for Atari fans but fans of 1970s and 1980s technology. There is a second book in the works about the Tramiel era Atari called 'Atari Corp. - Business Is War', which I plan on reviewing after its release.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great stories make for a great book on Atari, January 27, 2014
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This review is from: Atari Inc.: Business is Fun (Paperback)
Really great book that has a detailed history and interesting perspectives that add a lot of interest. The only real complaint is there's numerous typos, and the book seems completely devoid of an editor at points. An online preview of the book also showed color images throughout, however the printed version is entirely in black and white.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great read, December 8, 2013
By 
Jason Worley (Plano, TX United States) - See all my reviews
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If you grew up in 70's and 80's and cut your teeth on atari games and computer products, this is a fascinating behind the scenes history. There are more than a few typos and other errors but does not get in the way of the story. A big thank you to the authors for a detailed and interesting book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why buy a Kindle version of a book I already have a hard copy of?, May 25, 2013
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Well, besides the ease of carrying around a Nexus 10 with many books as opposed to one book, this book is so goddamn amazing, it was worth it to me to get it again and support the authors. I'm really hoping they can get part 2 (entitled Atari - Business Is War)off the ground running so I can read me some naughty Jack Tramiel stories (What DID you do with all the remaining Swordquest prizes, ya old coot?).

Honestly though, if you want to know the origins of the first great videogame company through spectacular, startling and sordid stories, this is the one for you.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed reaction, February 1, 2014
By 
B. Paul (Colorado, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Atari Inc.: Business is Fun (Paperback)
Clearly, the authors put a lot of time and effort into writing the book. There's an incredible amount of detail describing Atari's history and the people involved. However, I was hoping to get more technical information. I wanted to learn more about the development of the Atari VCS and 8-bit computer hardware. I think Jay Miner was only mentioned twice in the whole book. The sections which went into some technical detail were prefixed with silly "warning: technical information ahead" warnings. I think most readers of the book are technically minded and would have appreciated more depth in that area.

Finally, like most other reviewers, I have to say the number of typos and grammatical errors is stunning. Even "Atari" is misspelled at one point! Running a spell checker and having an experienced editor would have improved the quality immensely. I've never read a book with so many errors. I'm still shaking my head over that.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The People's History Of Atari, January 4, 2013
By 
Steve A. Fulton (Redondo Beach, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Atari Inc.: Business is Fun (Paperback)
Gather around here children, I'm going to tell you fairy tale. It's called "The Legend Of King Pong" and it's about the rise and fall of the world's first successful video game company.

Once upon a time a prince rode into Silicon Valley from the far far away land of Utah. He was named Nolan and worked at Carnivals during college while playing a game named Space War on the the University's computer. One day an idea was sparked in his head that he could put the two things together and make it into a business. While working late at night in his daughter's bedroom, he created the very first video game named Computer Space and sold it to Nutting Associates. The game was too complicated for the unwashed masses and was not a success. Because of this, Prince Nolan started his own company named Atari, and set out to design a much simpler game that any mere mead-swilling peasant could master. That game was named Pong, and it was the very first successful video game. Because of this, prince Nolan was crowned King Pong. Under King Pong, Atari produced many more video games for arcades, and then the first home video game version of Pong. They were very successful, but King Pong was not satisfied with the size of his realm He decided that Atari should create the first programmable video game system named the Atari VCS However, he did not have enough gold in his coffers, so King Pong made a fateful decision to join his company with the evil empire known as Warner Communications. This made King Pong rich, and it helped Atari produce the Atari Video Computer System. Everything was going great until an evil wizard named Ray Kassar took over the kingdom of Atari, banished King Pong to the land of Chuck E. Cheese, and began his own reign of terror. For many years Kassar wielded his iron fist, calling his servants "towel designers", and flushing all of King Pong's success down the drain. Kassar used short-term marketing-based magic spells that helped Atari grow into the biggest video game company in the world. However, without the long-term vision of King Pong, they were doomed to fail. One fateful day, the wizard Kassar signed a deal in blood with two licensing demons, one named Pac-Man, and the other named E.T. Atari produced games for both, and no one bought them because they were terrible. This caused the entire video game industry to crash in fiery explosion. Thwarted, the evil Wizard Kassar slipped out the back of castle Atari with wagonloads of Pac-Man and E.T. cartridges that he buried in the far off sands of Alamogordo, New Mexico, where they were lost forever. The Wizard Kassar was never heard from again, and Kingdom of Atari fell into financial ruin.

The End.

The previous story is basically the "myth of Atari", as told and retold over the past 40 years. However, according to a new book by Atari historians Marty Goldberg and Curt Vendel, most of it is a complete fabrication. Their self-published book , Atari Inc: Business Is Fun is an exciting, messy, sprawling tour-de-force that fills in a lot missing gaps for Atari fans worldwide. The book reads like 800 page manifesto attempting to right-wrongs and clear-up misconceptions about Atari. At its' core, this 800 page behemoth aims to prove one main fact to Atari aficionados: That Nolan Bushnell, "King Pong", was not solely responsible for the success of Atari. If that is, indeed, its'` primary goal, the book succeeds famously.

The text weaves somewhat asynchronously, with various levels of detail, throughout the history of Atari, treading ground that has rarely been covered before. The authors unearthed documents, memos, company newsletters, and legal settlements that have never been previously published. They also interviewed dozens of people: everyone from Atari engineers to executives and their secretaries, so they could form a full picture of the first successful video game company. For accuracy, they cross-refereneced interviews and tried to only use stories that were corroborated by 2 or more people. What emerges is a tale that attempts to correct inaccuracies and bust the myths of Atari's past.

According to Curt Vendel, the research went like this:

"One thing I did in all of the face to face and phone interviews is I never read from questions, I simply told each person 'tell me the John Smith story, how did you find out about Atari, how did you get hired and tell me what you did from there and until you left? What were your best and worst moments and memories?' and each person was left to talk for as long as they wanted, some interviews were 45 mins, some were 3-4 hours. But we never directed or railed any part of the interviews. When a key event was mentioned with a name, then when that named person was interviewed as well, we waited to see if that person on their own would reiterate the same event. If it happened, then we knew we had an event that was not one persons perspective, but a multiple person sourced event. Others were more concrete with internal memo's, letters and court docs."

The story starts with a pair of protagonists (instead of just one) dreaming big in the Silicon Valley. Ted Dabney and Nolan Bushnell meet at Ampex in the late 1960's, share an office, and dream-up ways to make it big on their own. Bushnell is the young gun full of ideas and ambition, while Dabney is the old hat with technical skills to make things happen. The story goes on to counter Nolan Bushnell "mythology" as it ties significant events in Atari's early history to Dabney (and later, others) instead of (or as well as) Bushnell. For instance, the often-told story that Nolan Bushnell moved his own daughter out of her bedroom to work on Computer Space is rebutted by Ted Dabney (through quotes and paraphrases) when it is revealed that the bedroom taken away was not Bushnell's daughter's at all, but Dabney's own daughter Terri's.

This re-written Atari history (with a stronger focus on Ted Dabney) was curiously verified after a strange event on the Atariage.com forums back in 2010. Just after the new Atari named Nolan Bushnell to their board of directors, a forum thread was started and Atari fans commented on the event. The posts got very heated, attackers and defenders of Bushnell voiced their thoughts loudly, and like most internet arguments, few opinions were changed This would not have been newsworthy, except that someone named Nolan Bushnell decided to show-up and defend himself. Then a guy named Ted Dabney showed up (sent there by this books' very authors), as well as a few other ex Atari employees, and the whole forums went ballistic. When someone mentioned that Ted Dabney was the one who moved his daughter out, not Bushnell, Bushnell came back and said something like "Ted Dabney did not have a daughter". This bewildered Dabney because, not only did he have a daughter, but Bushnell knew her very well. Ted Dabney came to the forums to defend Bushnell, but this very public slight appeared to dull his enthusiasm for it. It was a weird occurrence that caught a lot of Atari fans off-guard and made them question the history of Atari as they had known it for decades. While Goldberg and Vendel had been planning a book that focused on the Dabney/Bushnell relationship for many years, this event brought the conflict into full view for Atari fans to see for themselves.

(You can read the thread here: [...]

This Bushnell/Dabney relationship is the cornerstone of the book's myth-breaking. It shows that a very simple fact Nolan Bushnell has repeated for the past 40 years, is in itself, possibly not true (Bushnell has stated elsewhere that they BOTH moved daughters out of bedrooms) . A theme arises in the pages and it appears to be this: if that one simple fact is not true, what else is in the "Atari Fairy Tale" is also not true?

In the book, instead of Nolan Bushnell being the mythical "King Pong", the authors paint him as a talented and visionary opportunist who, at the first sign of success, transformed into an aloof, egocentric, tinkerer who disappeared from Atari when it was no longer "fun" to be there. The subtext is the assertion that he developed an Atari "creation myth" over the years that squeezed others out (including his former partner) so he could have all the glory and most of the money, for himself. While the book succeeds in this regard, at times the parts of the story that focus on Bushnell feel a bit one-sided, like a tell-all, unauthorized biography. In parts of the stpry, the authors can only speculate on his motives. This is most likely because Bushnell opted out of contributing to these parts of the book. Apparently, while Bushnell was interviewed for other parts of the story, his perspective on the Ted Dabney issue was not captured formally, and he declined to endorse the text or write a forward. The authors allude to this fact in one of the multiple existing "forwards" While not naming Bushnell outright, they point out that the "absence" of some "well known people" that did not contribute to the book. In short, it appears that Bushnell did not like the way he was portrayed, so he did not participate in the book. It's easy to see why that mikght be the case. If there was any question as to the the "placement" of Bushnell in this Atari story, the two "Forward" sections (besides the author's) were written by Ted Dabney himself, and by long-time Bushnell rival, Ralph Baer.

While the focus of most previous Atari histories is Nolan Bushnell, this book proves its' main theme by *not* focusing on him. While Bushnell is credited and praised often in the text, the perspective and accomplishments of other Atari employees are given just as much if not more space in the text. This is where the book is at its' best. Sections on the development of the Atari 8-bit computers, GCC, Atari Grass Valley Think Tank, Ataritel, and The Atari Pinball Division crackle with intensity and interest, mostly because they are histories that have never been printed before. The book goes a long way to make sure the names, effort and input of even the most remote personnel related to Atari are brought to the forefront. The detail here is amazing, and in some cases overwhelming. The book is filled with images (all black and white) of cancelled Atari products, prototypes, security badges, facilities, after work parties, etc. The images are so interesting in fact, that a full-color coffee-table book of them would be welcome follow-up.

Authors Marty Goldberg and Curt Vendel are well known in Atari "circles" as the guys with "the goods". Curt is famous for purchasing boxes full of equipment and documents from shuttered Atari offices, operating atarimuseum.com and running his own company named Legacy Engineering that has designed new products based on classic Atari intellectual property including the Atari Flashback 1 and 2. Marty works in the game industry as a programmer, has written dozens of articles on classic gaming, and formerly ran a website named atarihq.com. They are well known as having the "last word" on Atari history, often visiting message boards and comment sections to set the record straight. (I would not be surprised if they showed-up here.) This book represents almost two decades of their research and efforts. It's an impressive undertaking and they deserve kudos for attempting such a gargantuan project.

While the detail here is impressive, and the depth staggering, there are also some issues. As much as I admire people that self-publish their own work, there are a few typos, the text changes tenses often, repeats passages, includes a few too many exclamation points, addresses the reader directly, and is filled with the kind of awkward sentences a good editor would stamp out immediately. I personally know how easy it is for these kinds of issues to slip in when you are writing large amount of text, and I feel sympathy for the author's efforts to stamp them out without the help of a copy editor. Furthermore, few publishers appear willing to touch video game history books these days, so the authors probably had no alternative but to go it alone. In that case, the text just needed a few more passes to get cleaned-up.

There are also some organizational issues that can't be ignored. Certain detailed asides, technical run-downs, and minor points scream for placement in breakout boxes, page notes and/or appendices. This is not because they aren't fascinating or useful, but because there is just an overwhelming amount of content to consume within the 800 pages presented. When there are literally 100's of opinions and many years of facts and events to cover, organizing the content in a book like this is of the utmost importance. There have been other, very long, and informative pop-culture-based books that have dealt with the same massive amount of information in a different way. I Want My MTV by Craig Marks and Rob Tannenbaum solved the issue by using an oral history format. The basic facts were laid out per chapter, and then key figures were quoted to tell the story. Live From New York, An Uncensored History Of Saturday Night Live by Tom Shales and James Andrew Miller used a similar format. Both books made a massive amount of history digestible by offering-up the words of their primary sources to move the story along. Sometimes the quotes agree, sometimes they don't, but it helps tell a full, well rounded story that doesn't appear biased or like a tabloid piece.

Also, the expert level of the information presented might leave casual readers bewildered. The book is written as a kind of counterpoint to existing Atari histories in books like Game Over by David Sheff, The First Quarter by Steven L. Kent, and especially Zap! The Rise And Fall Of Atari by Scott Cohen. In some cases, the authors appear to expect the reader to have already read these sources and be familiar with the previous misconceptions they are trying to clear-up. A short introduction that explains the "Atari Myth" would have helped rectify this situation, and ease less ardent Atari fans into the fold. However, the most glaring omission are references. Without an index, footnotes or bibliography, the book reads like a long, multi-chaptered, blog-post. If adding a fart joke to Wikipedia requires at least 3 citations, an unprecedented 800 page book about the history of Atari Inc. needs, at the very least, to have some documentation of where the facts came from, even if it's a list of first-party interviews and official Atari documents.

According to Curt Vendel, these things were omitted becasue the simply ran out of space:

"We had to cut out the index which would've been 12-14 pages and references may have been quite a few pages, what we may do eventually is post both onto Ataribook.com for people to download a pdf and print out,we simply ran out of room .We had to cut out and reduce sizes of a lot of photos because I think we were actually at 927 pages and it was just getting insane and with the Createspace limit of 828 pages, we needed to leave a buffer for future additions in the 2nd edition, so we had to trim some things, it was not an easy choice"

Even with these flaws, the book is still an essential text and begs to be read. Any video game enthusiast interested in the history of Atari needs to experience this massive set of eye-opening content first hand. The book is like the People's History Of Atari, written from the perspective of key Atari contributors and employees that have been forgotten by time. Goldberg and Vendel have done what no one else has ever accomplished before: they managed to tell the full tale of Atari Inc. from 1972-1984, warts and all. In the end, whether or not you believe their alternate-to-Bushnell take on events doesn't really matter. You will come away from the book with a much fuller picture of the people, events, and products that helped form the legends and myths of Atari, the world's first successful video game company.

Score:
7 stars out of 5 for the massive, unimaginably detailed, unprecedented, text and photos
2 stars out of 5 for organization, text issues, missing references, etc.
for total of 4.5 stars out of 5. (rounded up)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Have you played Atari today?, March 22, 2014
By 
Retroboi (Brisbane, Australia) - See all my reviews
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If you are a video game fan, particularly a fan of the Atari VCS, then you cannot afford to go past this book. It is a real page-turner and I did not want it to ever end. I devoured it.
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Atari Inc.: Business is Fun
Atari Inc.: Business is Fun by Mr. Marty Goldberg (Paperback - November 25, 2012)
$29.99 $25.51
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