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Atlanta Graves Mass Market Paperback – April 1, 1998


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 283 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley (April 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425162672
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425162675
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.8 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,288,162 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Readers who approach a new mystery series with caution will be delighted by the debut of Atlanta, Georgia, private investigator Sunny Childs. Sunny is an appealing lead--tough, funny, likable, insecure, and smart. The story, which has Sunny racing against time to solve an art theft and catch a killer before her detective agency defaults on a large bank loan, will have readers turning the pages as fast as they can. The novel's only drawback is its Remington Steelelike premise: Sunny must constantly "front" for the agency's owner, the mysterious Gunnar Brushwood, who is never around when he's needed. Some readers--especially fans of the popular television series--may find this a tad derivative. However, it's worth overlooking, for this is otherwise a top-notch mystery, and the further adventures of Sunny Childs will be most welcome. David Pitt

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 3, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Gunnar Brushurd is a legend in his own time as the daring renowned owner of Peachtree Investigations, an Atlanta-based private detective firm. However, Gunnar is out of pocket, leaving Sunny Childs in charge of both the operational and financial operations of the company. While trying to ransom a stolen painting for a client, Sunny's perp is shot and the painting remains missing. She also learns that Gunnar has cashed a $100K CD that was used as collateral on a credit line at the bank.
The bank calls in the loan, giving Sunny four days to pay back the debt or they will foreclose the business. When she reports to her client that the painting was stolen, she cuts a deal to find the painting in exchange for a $100K. Sunny is determined to save the company and regain the painting, regardless of the obstacles tossed her way by dangerous felons who will kill anyone who crosses their path.
Readers will like the tough Sunny, who is an amalgam (not of DC and Marvel) of Scarpetta, Blake, and Milhorne. The convoluted plot yields many suspects, false trails, and red herrings, thereby guaranteeing an exhilarating how and who-done-it. Ruth Birmingham has started a terrific series that brings alive the mean streets of Atlanta.
Harriet Klausner
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Shannon M. Scott on April 10, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Atlanta Graves introduces Atlanta PI Sunny Childs. Sunny, part owner and operative for Peachtree Investigations is hired to retrieve a stolen painting. She spends much of her time fronting for absent boss, and Peachtree Investigations founder, Gunnar Brushwood, trying to keep the business solvent, pleasing her mother and dumping her married lover. Set in Atlanta, Sunny moves easily from Dunwoody and glitzy benefits to a ride on Marta to crime-ridden Southwest Atlanta. Author Ruth Birmingham offers a glimpse of Atlanta that makes you feel like she knows the territory (with one glaring error -- a character who majored in Criminal Justice at Georgia Tech). Like many mysteries, the title does not have any real relation to the plot but Sunny may eventually develop into a well-rounded character who could sustain a series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Schowalter on May 24, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read this book after I'd read the author's two following books about Sunny. Take my word, read this one first. The plot gets entangled and confused, but it is clear that Ms Birmingham has style. After this book, she sorts out how to do plots, and soars from 3 stars to 5 stars.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fine debut detective novel by Ruth Birmingham, and it makes me look forward to reading more of her work. Her protagonist, Sunny Childs, PI, is clever, feisty, and always interesting, and the story is well-plotted, full of interesing twists and turns.
Birmingham succeeds in creating a tone that is hip and humorous and overall her style does resemble that of Sue Grafton. There's certainly room for more great mysteries with female protagonists, though, isn't there? It's also great fun to see a detective series set in Atlanta, a dynamic, cosmopolitan, and historic city.
The only drawback I found was the laborious "let me tell you how I did it before I kill you" passage toward the end of the book. I suppose this is pretty standard fare for detective novels, but I would like to think that this feature could be minimized.
Otherwise, congratlations to Ms. Birmingham for her inaugural effort.
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